Intel has recently added eight unannounced desktop Coffee Lake processors to its MDDS (material declaration datasheet) database. Three new chips belong to the Core i3/i5 lineup are targeting mainstream PCs, whereas another five are Pentium Gold and Celeron products designed for entry-level systems. Their inclusion into the MDDS database likely precedes their formal introduction in the coming weeks or months.

Intel has introduced six desktop Coffee Lake CPU models to date, and considering how broad the company’s processor lineups usually are, it is obvious that the chip maker is prepping more SKUs. A list containing dozens of unannounced CFL products leaked in late November gave us an idea what to expect from the Coffee Lake family in general, but without many specifications or a timeline. Meanwhile, last week’s updates to the MDDS* database give us an idea what to expect from Intel in the near future.

The list of new Coffee Lake processors published by Intel includes its six-core Core i5-8600 and Core i5-8500 CPUs as well as a  quad-core Core i3-8300 chip. The first two products will sit between the Core i5-8400 and the Core i5-8600K, so their prices will be higher than $182, but lower than $257. The Core i3-8300 will be positioned above the already available Core i3-8100 and will be priced accordingly (i.e., higher than $117).

The addition of three new Coffee Lake processors to the Core i3/i5 lineup will expand Intel’s family of mainstream CFL products, but it is the addition of the new Pentium Gold and Celeron products featuring the new microarchitecture that will make Intel’s 300-series platform more attractive to consumers in budget markets. Intel has yet to announce the specifications of its Pentium Gold G5600, Pentium Gold G5500, Pentium Gold G5400, Celeron G4920 and Celeron G4900, but from what we know about the CPUs is that they all have two physical cores (the Pentium chips also support Hyper-Threading), the Intel UHD 610 integrated GPU, and approximately ~51 W TDP. As for prices, Intel’s Pentium Gold and Celeron CPUs are not expensive and usually cost around $100 and lower.

Intel 8th Generation Desktop Processors
Coffee Lake-S
Specifications not
confirmed except *
Cores Base
Freq
Turbo
Freq
L3 TDP List
Price
Core i7
Core i7-8700K * 6 / 12 3.7 4.7 12 MB 95 W $359
Core i7-8700 * 6 / 12 3.2 4.6 12 MB 65 W $303
Core i7-8700B   6 / 12 ? ? 12 MB ? $303
Core i7-8700T   6 / 12 ? ? 12 MB 35 W $303
Core i7-8670   6 / 12 ? ? 12 MB 65 W ?
Core i7-8670T   6 / 12 ? ? 12 MB 35 W ?
Core i5
Core i5-8650K   6 / 6 ? ? 9 MB ? ?
Core i5-8650   6 / 6 ? ? 9 MB 65 W ?
Core i5-8600K * 6 / 6 3.6 4.3 9 MB 95 W $257
Core i5-8600 ** 6 / 6 ? ? 9 MB 65 W ?
Core i5-8550   6 / 6 ? ? 9 MB 65 W ?
Core i5-8500 ** 6 / 6 ? ? 9 MB 65 W ?
Core i5-8500B   6 / 6 ? ? 9 MB ? ?
Core i5-8500T   6 / 6 ? ? 9 MB 35 W ?
Core i5-8420   6 / 6 ? ? 9 MB 65 W ?
Core i5-8420T   6 / 6 ? ? 9 MB 35 W ?
Core i5-8400 * 6 / 6 2.8 4.0 9 MB 65 W $182
Core i5-8400B   6 / 6 ? ? 9 MB ? $182
Core i5-8400T   6 / 6 ? ? 9 MB 35 W $182
Core i3
Core i3-8350K * 4 / 4 4.0 8 MB 91 W $168
Core i3-8320   4 / 4 ? 8 MB 65 W ?
Core i3-8320T   4 / 4 ? 8 MB 35 W ?
Core i3-8300 ** 4 / 4 ? ? ? ?
Core i3-8300T   4 / 4 ? 8 MB 35 W ?
Core i3-8120   4 / 4 ? 6 MB 65 W ?
Core i3-8120T   4 / 4 ? 6 MB 35 W ?
Core i3-8100 * 4 / 4 3.6 6 MB 65 W $117
Core i3-8100T   4 / 4 ? 6 MB 35 W $117
Core i3-8020   4 / 4 ? 6 MB 65 W ?
Core i3-8020T   4 / 4 ? 6 MB 35 W ?
Core i3-8000   4 / 4 ? 6 MB 65 W ?
Core i3-8000T   4 / 4 ? 6 MB 35 W ?
Pentium Gold
Pentium Gold G5620   2 / 4 ? 3 MB ? ?
Pentium Gold G5620T   2 / 4 ? 3 MB 35 W ?
Pentium Gold G5600 ** 2 / 4 ? 3 MB ? ?
Pentium Gold G5500 ** 2 / 4 ? 3 MB ? ?
Pentium Gold G5500T   2 / 4 ? 3 MB 35 W ?
Pentium Gold G5420   2 / 4 ? 3 MB ? ?
Pentium Gold G5420T   2 / 4 ? 3 MB 35 W ?
Pentium Gold G5400 ** 2 / 4 ? 3 MB ? ?
Pentium Gold G5400T   2 / 4 ? 3 MB 35 W ?
Celeron
Celeron G4950   2 / 2 ? 2 MB ? ?
Celeron G4930   2 / 2 ? 2 MB ? ?
Celeron G4930T   2 / 2 ? 2 MB 35 W ?
Celeron G4920 ** 2 / 2 ? 2 MB ? ?
Celeron G4900 ** 2 / 2 ? 2 MB ? ?
Celeron G4900T   2 / 2 ? 2 MB 35 W ?

*Processors that are already launched
**New Entries in the MDDS database

Intel did not comment on the news story because the products have not been announced officially.

*Intel’s MDDS database contains information about ROHS compliancy and usage of hazardous materials by Intel’s products. Virtually all commercial products by the company end up there. However, a listing does not mean an imminent launch. Moreover, back in the day, this database included products that were never released.

Related Reading

Source: Intel MDDS via ComputerBase.

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  • kgardas - Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - link

    Still no xeons? Reply
  • Dragonstongue - Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - link

    I would really like if cpu/gpu makers would use a better designation of TDP...such as TPL (True Power Limit) so if something said 95w TPL that means it was designed to NOT exceed this number and has been tested as such, TDP more oft than not is a very loose designation, sometimes it means with a light load, sometimes it means only 1 out of 4 cores loaded to maximum frequency etc, in other words, is a stupid number to be using these days, too many review sites are using this to compare competing products and saying well product A TDP is X whereas product B TDP is Y so therefore product A always wins....

    TPL (at least in theory) would better put all the varying figures under one hood (not counting overvolt or overclock) TDP can sometimes measure power with the overclock (such as turbo core) or in the case of some graphics cards WITH an overlock, but sometimes the rated TDP is not even taking into account default clocks such as many many graphics cards/cpu using above to well above those numbers in normal operation, in a perfect world the maker be it Intel, Nvidia, AMD or whatever would ensure that ALL products out of a given line would not use above TDP, but it is not a perfect world, and such more often than not simply becomes a "in best circumstances"

    Glad to see Intel releasing a whole slew of decent priced high core count models, but, likely one still suffers detriment on what the motherboard will give you based on the price of the cpu being used (the higher priced ones generally allow more pci-e lanes, more sata etc) Shows AMD really gave them a kick in the butt to push comparable stuff out really quickly, shame they could not settle on just a few awesome models and do a normal "intel way" of having 1 bajillion models out that some have this feature or that feature instead of fewer having all the same base line features (at least AMD did this properly Intel still has not learned).

    the 8700 is interesting, but they really should have bumped its base clock up by 100-200Mz IMO.
    Reply
  • edzieba - Thursday, February 08, 2018 - link

    A peak power draw rating is not very useful to anyone except the engineers speccing capacitors on the output stages of power supply circuitry. CPUs and GPUs draw dramatically carrying amounts of power on the microsecond-to-microsecond level, just looking at the peaks tells you very little about actual power usage. Reply
  • Wolfclaw - Thursday, February 08, 2018 - link

    Agree on a lot of what you said, even more on the fact that Intel had to get its teeth kicked in by AMD to offer more cores, obvious they had the capabilities to do this years back, but preferred to milk their market dominance, rather than innovate. Reply
  • Qwertilot - Thursday, February 08, 2018 - link

    Not so many years ago if you assume they were planning to keep the TDP under reasonable control - the one thing they have been really improving recently is the power draw of their big cores when clocked a bit lower. Reply
  • Samus - Thursday, February 08, 2018 - link

    Don't be naive to think Intel didn't plan this years ago. They didn't just engineer new CPU's with more cores out of the blue when AMD announced Ryzen earlier last year. It takes years to see through production of chips like these. Basically...this was going to happen anyway.

    However, perhaps AMD played a roll in making sure the prices didn't spike as much as we've been used too from Intel. i5/i7's have been creeping up in price generation over generation...
    Reply
  • prisonerX - Sunday, February 11, 2018 - link

    Thanks for being our friendly neighbourhood Intel apologist, Samus.

    But you are right. Intel's been working on these for years, and has been sitting on them for years. That's how they do the magic trick.
    Reply
  • Samus - Thursday, February 08, 2018 - link

    If that i7-8700T boosts above 4GHz and clocks above 3GHz, it will be a 35w monster. That's just insane for something that could potentially be passively cooled. Reply
  • peevee - Thursday, February 08, 2018 - link

    What a mess. Reply
  • TheJian - Sunday, February 11, 2018 - link

    Figure a fan in the cost of many of those Intel chips. So another $20-45 for my usual suspects. Reply

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