Coffee Lake with Iris Plus at 28W

Intel recently announced its ‘Intel Core with Radeon RX Vega’ processor line, featuring a H-series processor combined with an AMD graphics chip and a sizeable amount of high-speed HBM2 memory connected via Intel’s proprietary EMIB technology. These parts are designed to service the high-end for integrated graphics, going above and beyond any other integrated graphics solution in the past. That used to be a post held by Intel’s processors that used eDRAM, using the Iris, Iris Pro, and Iris Plus branding. Now the Iris line sits in the middle, acting as Intel’s graphics focused products in the mid-power range.

For the launch today, Intel is lifting the lid on four separate Iris Plus-based processors. These all use the Coffee Lake microarchitecture and are built on Intel’s 14++ process. All four of these processors are in Intel’s ‘GT3e’ graphics configuration, which uses Intel’s Gen 9.5 graphics with 48 execution units (EUs) and 128 MB of eDRAM. This is compared to the GT2 configurations seen on most other processors, that have 24 EUs and zero eDRAM.

AnandTech Cores Base
Freq
Turbo
Freq
L3 vPro DRAM
DDR4
iGPU
EUs
iGPU
Freq
Core i7-8559U $431 4 / 8 2.7 4.5 8 MB No 2400 48 EUs 300 / 1200
Core i5-8269U $320 4 / 8 2.6 4.2 6 MB No 2400 48 EUs 300 / 1100
Core-i5-8259U $320 4 / 8 2.3 3.8 6 MB No 2400 48 EUs 300 / 1050
Core i3-8109U $304 2 / 4 3.0 3.6 4 MB No 2400 47 EUs 300 / 1000

Intel has split these new CPUs up into a single Core i7-8559U, which is a quad-core processor with the most L3 cache, two Core i5 parts that are also quad-core but have reduced L3 cache, and a Core i3-8109U processor that is dual core, but with the same amount of L3 cache per core as the Core i7-8559U.

In Intel’s manufacturing parlance, this means that the Core i7 and Core i5 are all ‘4+3e’ units, meaning four cores and GT3 graphics with eDRAM. By contrast, the Core i3 is a ‘2+3e’ processor, with only two cores but the same GT3e graphics with eDRAM as the i7/i5. Based on the design of these processors, the Core i3 sits as the lower binned part: it is manufactured as a 4+3e design, but due to processor defects is only suitable to run two cores. As with most of the other mobile processors, the higher performance parts often get the highest frequency graphics as well. In this case, the Core i7-8559U sits at the top at 1200 MHz.

For the eDRAM, in previous generations Intel has moved from going all parts at 128 MB to having some move down to 64 MB, but now moves back up to all of them having 128 MB again. For the eDRAM implementation, Intel is still using their second generation eDRAM implementation whereby the eDRAM acts as a L4 buffer for supplying the L3 from DRAM through the System Agent – this is compared to the first generation where the eDRAM was a victim cache. This methodology allows the eDRAM to speed up more use cases than just graphics, and the 50 GBps bidirectional bandwidth is certainly a big leap over main DRAM bandwidth (that some OEMs run in single channel mode anyway). Iris Plus processors can also be equipped with discrete graphics, although this is up to the OEM.

The 28W Iris Plus processors will match the other mobile counterparts on chipset, and support the new features such as integrated Intel 802.11ac Wi-Fi and native USB 3.1 (10 Gbps) support. We do not know to what extent these are supported, and are waiting on more information. The Iris Pro parts will also support Optane-accelerated storage.

High-Performance Mobile: Core i9 and Xeon E at 45W High-Performance Desktop: 65W to 35W Coffee Lake CPUs
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  • damianrobertjones - Tuesday, April 03, 2018 - link

    No, no and no. The value of that machine will fall fast once Apple moves to (Add cpu here) in 2020. Reply
  • goatfajitas - Tuesday, April 03, 2018 - link

    LOL. Keep dreaming. Apple has a tiny marketshare and their media strong CPU's are not and will not be a match for Intel in real computing space. Reply
  • PeachNCream - Tuesday, April 03, 2018 - link

    But there's already a lot of speculation based on a Bloomberg article of a shift starting in 2020 from Intel x86 CPUs to some sort of higher performance ARM processor in order to unify the OS experience across Apple products. Take a look on Google for Kalamata which is the project name. If what looks like leaks are true, there's a change blowing in the wind in Apple's Macintosh product line. Reply
  • Ratman6161 - Tuesday, April 03, 2018 - link

    I doubt it will be a good change if you are a die hard Mac person. As things stand today, no ARM chip is going to match Intel for raw computing power. Power consumption, sure but no where close on raw speed. To me it seems almost like they are getting ready to write off their traditional fan base of graphics people. Reply
  • PeachNCream - Tuesday, April 03, 2018 - link

    I really don't know what to make of this from a performance and compute perspective (or any other perspective for that matter) as I don't own or use a Mac. If its true that Apple is planning to use in-house ARM processors in only a couple of years, then they've probably already been in development for a while and they will need to compete with x86 hardware if they expect to land sales. At this point, I'm just curious about what will happen and how it might or might not shake up the industry. Reply
  • BillBear - Tuesday, April 03, 2018 - link

    Actually, we've already seen ARM chips surpass Intel in the server space where Intel is strongest.

    https://blog.cloudflare.com/arm-takes-wing/
    Reply
  • FunBunny2 - Tuesday, April 03, 2018 - link

    "2020 from Intel x86 CPUs to some sort of higher performance ARM processor "

    well, they could stamp 12 or 24 or 48 ARM cores on a chip, and call it a CPU. but that would mean they've abandoned single thread performance. it only makes sense if they've some secret multi-threaded sauce, built into macOS (or whatever they end up calling it), that runtime converts from single to multi. that's some Catch 22.
    Reply
  • PeachNCream - Tuesday, April 03, 2018 - link

    It sounds like the current intent is to consolidate under iOS across all of their computing devices. I do wonder how you'd reach a x86-comparable performance level with ARM cores. You're right they'd almost have to go crazy into multi-threaded stuff, but there are still some workloads that just don't benefit much. Like I said above though, I'm not really praising the move or particularly excited about it. It's just something that'd be interesting to watch happen. Reply
  • HStewart - Tuesday, April 03, 2018 - link

    A non Intel based Mac will never replace high end mac - that may try it say MacBook Air line - but it likely be very unsuccessful. Reply
  • SaturnusDK - Tuesday, April 03, 2018 - link

    You underestimate the baa! of the iSheep. They'll buy whatever crap Apple launches. Reply

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