Alongside today's 16-inch MacBook Pro announcement, Apple has also confirmed that their long-awaited redesign of the Mac Pro, which has been due this fall, will be launching next month.

Apple’s upcoming Mac Pro desktop will be the company’s highest-performing desktop in years and will address the key issues of the cylindrical Mac Pro, namely insufficient graphics performance as well as limited expandability. The Mac Pro systems will be based on Intel’s Xeon W processors with up to 28 cores paired with up to 1.5 TB of DDR4-2933 as well as up to 4 TB of solid-state storage (using two SSDs based on the T2 controller). To offer its customers a whopping compute and graphics performance, Apple will equip its Mac Pro with up to two AMD Radeon Pro Vega II Duo graphics cards in MPX form-factor with a total of 16384 stream processors (4096 SPs per GPU) and 128 GB of HBM2 memory (32 GB per GPU). Furthermore, the systems may be equipped with the Afterburner ProRes and ProRes RAW FPGA-based accelerator card, or any other accelerator that is compatible with PCIe 3.0 bus (granted that the system has 64 PCIe lanes). In fact, with a 1.4 kW PSU, the new Mac Pro could accommodate quite a lot of options.

With the new Mac Pro workstation offering massive performance, its owners will naturally benefit from new high-resolution displays and here Apple has a unique proposition with its unique Pro Display XDR, which is also due out in December. The 32-inch monitor is based on a 10-bit IPS panel and features a 6016×3384 resolution, 1,000 nits – 1,600 nits brightness (sustained/peak), and a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio because of Mini-LED backlighting.

Apple will start taking orders on its new Mac Pro as well as Pro Display XDR in December. The Mac Pro workstation will start at $5,999 for a version with an eight-core processor. The standard version of the monitor will be priced at $4,999, whereas a model with nano-texture glass will be priced at $5,999. The display will come without a stand or VESA mount adapter that will have to be acquired separately for $999 and $199, respectively.

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Source: Apple

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  • M O B - Wednesday, November 13, 2019 - link

    The monitor doesn't even come with a stand or a VESA mount... Reply
  • p1esk - Wednesday, November 13, 2019 - link

    Maybe because many pros who will upgrade to this monitor use monitor arms. Reply
  • Papaspud - Wednesday, November 13, 2019 - link

    And any pros that don't.... will get to pay apple $1000 for that stand. Reply
  • CharonPDX - Wednesday, November 13, 2019 - link

    Which is why they need a VESA mount - which most monitors have the proper mount-holes on the display itself; with the new XDR Pro Display, it's $200 add-on. You have to spend at LEAST $200 extra for a mount. Reply
  • web2dot0 - Friday, November 15, 2019 - link

    If you can afford $6000 for a monitor and a nice VESA monitor ARM, I think you can afford a $200 VESA Mount adaptor. But hey, prove me wrong.

    This product isn't for people who can't justify spending $200 on a VESA mount.

    Can you get that through your thin skull?
    Reply
  • Samus - Friday, November 15, 2019 - link

    How do you think monitor arms attach to monitors? Magic?

    VESA mounts.
    Reply
  • smilingcrow - Wednesday, November 13, 2019 - link

    A big Mac with cheese to go! Reply
  • mkozakewich - Wednesday, November 13, 2019 - link

    I know the cheese-grater comments are gratuitous, but I legitimately asked myself, "Why did they put a picture of a cheese grater next to that iMac?" when I saw the leading image. I thought I was missing some kind of inside joke, until I realized that was actually a photo of the new Mac Pro. Reply
  • Teckk - Wednesday, November 13, 2019 - link

    So the new MBP Pro suports upto 8TB storage but this Mac Pro doesn't Reply
  • AdditionalPylons - Friday, November 15, 2019 - link

    That's a non-issue. You can add more storage via PCIe if you want more internal SSD storage that is also faster than the T2-limited built-in SSD, or connect to a 10G ethernet SAN or NAS for external disk arrays, or use Thunderbolt 3 or USB. Reply

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