Shadow of Mordor

The next title in our testing is a battle of system performance with the open world action-adventure title, Middle Earth: Shadow of Mordor (SoM for short). Produced by Monolith and using the LithTech Jupiter EX engine and numerous detail add-ons, SoM goes for detail and complexity. The main story itself was written by the same writer as Red Dead Redemption, and it received Zero Punctuation’s Game of The Year in 2014.

A 2014 game is fairly old to be testing now, however SoM has a stable code and player base, and can still stress a PC down to the ones and zeroes. At the time, SoM was unique, offering a dynamic screen resolution setting allowing users to render at high resolutions that are then scaled down to the monitor. This form of natural oversampling was designed to let the user experience a truer vision of what the developers wanted, assuming you had the graphics hardware to power it but had a sub-4K monitor.

The title has an in-game benchmark, for which we run with an automated script implement the graphics settings, select the benchmark, and parse the frame-time output which is dumped on the drive. The graphics settings include standard options such as Graphical Quality, Lighting, Mesh, Motion Blur, Shadow Quality, Textures, Vegetation Range, Depth of Field, Transparency and Tessellation. There are standard presets as well.

We run the benchmark at 1080p and a native 4K, using our 4K monitors, at the Ultra preset. Results are averaged across four runs and we report the average frame rate, 99th percentile frame rate, and time under analysis.

All of our benchmark results can also be found in our benchmark engine, Bench.

 

ASRock RX 580 Performance

Shadow of Mordor (1080p, Ultra)Shadow of Mordor (1080p, Ultra)

Shadow of Mordor (4K, Ultra)Shadow of Mordor (4K, Ultra)

GPU Tests: Civilization 6 GPU Tests: Rise of the Tomb Raider
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  • Marlin1975 - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    You used a "Cooler Master CLC"? Is that what comes with the CPU? If not then this is a awful review. Should use what cooler it comes with. Reply
  • Beany2013 - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    it doesn't come with a cooler, as far as I'm aware. Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    Correct. Reply
  • seamonkey79 - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    Should have run it naked then, what were you thinking? /s Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    I was thinking that getting blocked by content filters for indecency would hurt my business... Reply
  • deathBOB - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    You see indecency, I see a new (and potentially lucrative) take on PC hardware reviews. Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    That was already tried in the 90s. It doesn't work as well as you might think. (RIP PCXL) Reply
  • Alexvrb - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    See that's the problem with content filters... always chafin' me. Reply
  • npz - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    I guess you haven't bought any unlocked Intel cpus before Reply
  • SirMaster - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    Well, you can't say "before". You would have to say more recently. My unlocked 4770K came with a heatsink/fan. Reply

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