One of the many questions about AMD’s EPYC processor line related to AMD’s ability to reengage with OEMs since the Bulldozer era. Recent announcements from Microsoft Azure and Baidu have shown that at least two of the Super 7 cloud providers are on board, and today’s announcement brings Dell PowerEdge servers, powered by EPYC, into the mix.

Dell is launching three variants of the PowerEdge 14G line:

Dell PowerEdge 14G with EPYC
  PowerEdge
R6415
PowerEdge
R7415
PowerEdge
R7425
Size 1U 2U 2U
Sockets 1 1 2
CPUs Up to EPYC 7601
32 Core / 64 Threads
Up to 2x EPYC 7601
64 Core / 128 Threads
DRAM < 2TB DDR4 LRDIMMs
< 1TB DDR4 RDIMMs
< 4TB DDR4 LRDIMMs
< 2TB DDR4 RDIMMs
NVMe Drives 10 Total
8 Front Panel
24 Total
24 Front Panel
24 Total
24 Front Panel
PCIe Lanes 2 x PCIe 3.0 x16 3 x PCIe 3.0 x16
1 x PCIe 3.0 x8
6 x PCIe 3.0 x16
(up to 8 slots total)
GPU Support ? ? 3 x Dual Width
PSUs Platinum 550W
Bronze 450W
Titanium 750W
Platinum 495W
Platinum 750W
Platinum 1600W
Titanium 750W
Platinum 495W
Platinum 750W
Platinum 1100W
Platinum 1600W
Platinum 2000W
Storage Controllers PERC H330
PERC H370p
PERC H390p
PERC HBA330
PERC 9/10
PERC H330
PERC H370p
PERC H390p
PERC HBA330
PERC 9/10
PERC H330
PERC H370p
PERC H390p
PERC HBA330
PERC 9/10
Networking 2 x 1GbE or
2 x 10GbE or
2 x 10GbE SFP+
2 x 1GbE or
2 x 10GbE or
2 x 10GbE SFP+
4x1GbE + 2x10GbE
2x1GbE + 4x10GbE
2 x 25GbE

Users that have dealt with PowerEdge configurations will be used to the offerings: a single socket system focused on storage (R6415), a single socket system with more storage (R7415), and a dual socket system combining storage and graphics (R7425). All the systems support optional front and rear ports, including networking (dual 1GbE, dual 10GbE, or dual 10GbE SFP+), Dell’s OpenManage platform, and a series of PERC controllers.

As new EPYC based servers enter the market, it is always interesting to see how OEMs are implementing the different features. This applies not only to how OEMs will route 128 PCIe lanes, but also if further expansion is needed. In the case of the R7425, Dell is using a PCIe switch in order to provide sufficient lanes for the 24 NVMe drives while also providing up to eight PCIe slots for 64 lanes. This R7425 we were told can support three double width GPUs, however it was not divulged how these GPUs are connected – if all three are on one of the two CPUs, or it happens to be split. There are many ways to design the PCIe front-end of a server like this, and there are usually trade-offs.

If there is one thing to say about AMD’s server team, it is that they love to spread news about design wins when they can. Despite this announcement being about Dell’s latest line of PowerEdge 14G servers, it was AMD who got in touch to discuss the news from their perspective. Ultimately launches like this are building on EPYC being accepted by the bigger server providers, and feed into AMD’s narrative of working closer with OEMs through 2018.

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  • Ninhalem - Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - link

    Those fully enable EPYC chips come at a big price jump. From the Dell PowerEdge R6415 configuration page:

    Base Price: $2179.00

    + AMD EPYC™ 7251 2.1GHz/2.9GHz, 8C/16T, 32M Cache (120W) DDR4-2400 (Included in Price)
    + AMD EPYC™ 7281 2.1GHz/2.7GHz, 16C/32T, 32M Cache (155W/170W) DDR4-2400/2666 (+$313.43)
    + AMD EPYC™ 7351P 2.4GHz/2.9GHz, 16C/32T, 32M Cache (155W/170W) DDR4-2400/2666 (+$407.46)
    + AMD EPYC™ 7401P 2.0GHz/2.8GHz, 24C/48T, 64M Cache (155W/170W) DDR4-2400/2666 (+$877.61)
    + AMD EPYC™ 7551P 2.00GHz/2.55GHz, 32C/64T, 64M Cache (180W) DDR4-2666 (+$2131.35)
    + AMD EPYC™ 7601 2.20GHz/2.7GHz, 32C/64T, 64M Cache (180W) DDR4-2666 (+$4011.96)
    Reply
  • MonkeyPaw - Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - link

    All things being equal (which would be quite the oversimplification), the price per CPU core (using the final system price) of the base model is $272, where the 7601 price per core is $193. In such a metric, the best "deal" per core is the 7401P, at $127. So in the grand scheme of things, the CPU upgrade prices are not so bad. Reply
  • ajp_anton - Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - link

    The 32-core 7551P isn't far behind at $135 per core.

    The 7401P also has the best performance per $, assuming roughly that the CPU will run at the "base" frequency with all cores, narrowly beating the 7551P and 7351P.
    Reply
  • IGTrading - Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - link

    These are very good specs with very, very competitive prices, but we need some real world storage, RAM and computing benchmarks to get an idea of how these compare with similarly priced Intel solutions.

    Also, it would be perfect if, from now on, we would include the new Qualcomm server platform in the benchmarks.
    Reply
  • ZolaIII - Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - link

    Well Epyc P Linux benchmarks you can find for long time now on Phoronix. Reply
  • Hurr Durr - Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - link

    Says the character that was not so long ago publicly lamenting how he regrets recommending intel to somebody. Oh shills. Reply
  • silverblue - Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - link

    You must be wonderfully paranoid if you believe every recommendation to be the work of shills. Reply
  • kgardas - Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - link

    Looks like Dell is also on the EPYC wave finally since EPYC CPUs all more or less provide great perf per $ spent. It's great to see them provided also in at least some of Dell systems... Reply
  • Tewt - Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - link

    I was talking with my boss regarding AMD's recent rise. He has nothing but bad experience(I have the opposite) including buying servers where I don't have any experience. He pointed out something interesting to me that has me worried(I own some AMD stock) because of the high core count. I was hoping AMD could claw back server share but he says Microsoft changed their licensing from sockets to core count with Server 2016, making the AMD solution much more expensive to implement, possibly negating the benefits of its price/performance ratio in core counts vs Intel.

    Is this true or is there more server share in OSes like Linux where core count doesn't matter? Any other major issues that AMD has to overcome to gain back marketshare? I'm thinking with Intel's current 99% share, do they have to worry about software that is not as compatible where it could affect performance or functionality?
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - link

    Aaaand you came to this news article to ask that question? :| Reply

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