MSI MEG X570 Unify

The MSI MEG X570 Unify combines sleek and uniformed all-black aesthetics without the swathes of RGB LEDs which some users find garish. With similar specifications to the MSI MEG X570 Ace which we reviewed at launch, the MEG X570 Unify takes a more direct approach with some very interesting features. Not only has MSI dropped all of the fancy plastic on the rear panel cover and removes the integrated RGB LEDs, but the power delivery heatsink is incorporated into the large aluminium rear panel cover to create a massive and robust cooling solution for power users; the X570 Unify is using a 14-phase power delivery design and two 8-pin 12 V ATX connectors for power. The Unify is more focused towards enthusiasts and represents MSI's higher-tier of X570 models. 

Looking at the core feature set, the MSI MEG X570 Unify includes three PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 slots which each come with individual heatsinks for improved cooling performance when used with NVMe based drives. Also included four SATA ports and for the networking, included is a Realtek RTL8125 2.5 G NIC with an Intel AX200 Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax wireless interface. On the rear panel, there is a Realtek ALC1220 HD audio codec with three USB 3.1 G2 Type-A, one USB 3.1 G2 Type-C, two USB 3.1 G1 Type-A, and two USB 2.0 ports. Also present is a clear CMOS button, a Flash BIOS button, and a PS/2 combo port. There are three full-length PCIe 4.0 slots which operate at x16, x8/x8, and x8/x8/x4, as well as two PCIe 4.0 x1 slots. Supported memory speeds allow for DDR4-4600 and up to 128 GB to be installed.

Everything about this model screams enthusiast, but without all of the bells and whistles of the MEG X570 Ace. The MSI MEG X570 Unify even managed to push a Ryzen 9 3900X to 5857.01 MHz which is the current highest frequency for this processor on HWBot. That sends a very clear message that this model is suited for overclocking, but still provides users with the same premium desktop motherboard features as other competitive models in its product segment. At present, there is no pricing information available, but it's likely to cost around the same as the MSI MEG X570 Ace ($370).

MSI MEG X570 Ace MSI Prestige X570 Creation
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  • npz - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    see here as one example, with Gigabyte's 16 true phases for their VRM:
    https://www.anandtech.com/show/14432/gigabyte-unve...

    Their previous high end board for the X470 Aorus Ultra only had 8 phases + 3 for the SoC.
    Reply
  • dm29-84 - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Puzzles me the little attention paid to sound department. Specifically Gigabyte's notable inclusion of ESS Sabre DAC. If I'm right, USB DACs based on this controller justifies 200-400$ price tag with excellent scores. Great Anand site should include some procedure in that regard. Reply
  • Death666Angel - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Great DAC inside an electrical noisy environment is still questionable. People who care about great PC sound have external means. People who don't don't care about it apart from having a jack for their headphones. Reply
  • Qasar - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    why not just get a better quality discrete sound card and disable the onboard sound altogether ? i havent used onboard sound since the K7 days and Nvidia's SoundStorm :-) Reply
  • RSAUser - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    I don't think 99% of us have the equipment and heating capability to truly need an external sound card. Reply
  • RSAUser - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Hearing * Reply
  • Qasar - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    wasnt referring to external, was referring to an internal discrete sound card, like the soundblaster, asus or the like.. there is another sound card maker i am thinking of, but i can't remember the name of it right now.... Reply
  • ishkatar - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Which of these boards support SLI? I have 2 x GTX 1070 that I want to keep. Reply
  • Jansen - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    SLI is pretty much dead, but Asus PRIME X570 SERIES, MSI MEG X570 Godlike, and MEG X570 ACE do. Reply
  • PeachNCream - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Pretty much this. Modern games on DX12 won't see any benefit unless the game developer bakes in support (which they appear uninterested in doing for cost reasons) and older games run very well on a single modern GPU. AMD and NV are hardly acknowledging SLI these days either and nowhere but at the top end so there is even less compulsion for developers to bother with supporting it. All in all, you're better off not worrying about SLI unless the industry changes direction significantly in the next few years. Reply

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