ASUS ROG Strix X570-E Gaming

ASUS's Strix brand represents its more mid-range gaming focused offerings and the ASUS ROG Strix X570-E Gaming is one of two ATX sized Strix branded boards, with the X570-E being the more premium of the two models; the other being the slightly lower spec ASUS ROG Strix X570-F Gaming. Included is support for two-way NVIDIA SLI and up to three-way AMD CrossFire multi-graphics cards configurations, 2.5 Gigabit networking, and a Wi-Fi 6 wireless interface.

The ASUS ROG Strix X570-E includes the gaming-focused Realtek RTL8125G 2.5 Gigabit NIC with a second port controlled by an Intel I211-AT Gigabit NIC. The board's wireless capabilities come from the new Intel AX200 Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax adapter. The board boasts three full-length PCIe 4.0 slots which operate at x16, x8/x8, and x8/x8/x4, with the final four coming directly from the X570 chipset. The Strix themed chipset heatsink has two M.2 heatsinks emanating from the top and bottom side for the boards dual PCIe 4.0 M.2 and has a cooling fan integrated which is designed to keep the X570 chipset cool. The ROG Strix X570-E also has eight SATA ports and four DDR4 memory slots with support for up to 128 GB.

In terms of USB connectivity on the rear panel, there are three USB 3.1 G2 Type-A, one USB 3.1 G2 Type-C, and four USB 3.1 G1 Type-A ports. A SupremeFX S1220 HD audio codec powers the five color-coded 3.5 mm jacks, and an S/PDIF optical out, while a pair of video outputs consisting of an HDMI 2.0 and DisplayPort 1.2 output is featured. A handily located BIOS Flashback button and a single USB 3.1 G1 Type-A dedicated to this are clearly highlighted, and the ROG Strix X570-E also benefits from dual Ethernet ports with one being controlled by a Realtek RTL8125-CG 2.5 Gigabit NIC, while the other is driven by an Intel I1211-AT Gigabit NIC. There are also two antenna inputs for the Intel AX200 802.11ax Wi-Fi 6 wireless interface which also adds BT 5 connectivity into the mix.

The ASUS ROG Strix X570-E Gaming has an MSRP of $330 and represents its bridge between the mid-range and the higher end Crosshair VIII models. With Wi-Fi 6, 2.5 Gigabit + 1 Gigabit NICs and a SupremeFX S1220A HD audio codec and two-way NVIDIA SLI support, users looking for a high-quality ASUS X570 model may not have to look further than the Strix X570-F.

ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Impact ASUS ROG Strix X570-F Gaming
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  • The_Assimilator - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    I also owned a Z77 Extreme 4 at one time, and the X570 version is probably the closest to perfect that I've seen offered so far. If only it had a couple of extra USB ports on the back panel, it'd be a shoe-in. Reply
  • rUmX - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Hoping for price cuts on Intel cpus because no matter how good Ryzen is, these boards are way too expensive. Reply
  • Karmena - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Then get X470 or B450 boards. Or even X370 or B350 boards, you are in no way forced to use these latest mobos. Reply
  • sorten - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Good advice, and you get lower system power consumption as a bonus. The main reason to go with the more expensive x570 boards is PCIE 4.0, and you're not going to get that if you switch to Intel. Reply
  • Ratman6161 - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Asrock has the x570 pro 4 listed on their web site with an MSRP of $154.00 I've used their Pro X boards in a number of builds and always had good results with them. They don't seem to be available at retail yet (at least anywhere I've seen) . On the other hand, I'm not one of those to go out and buy any product on the first day. Street prices on both motherboards and CPU's are likely to drop quickly and...even if I go out and buy a new CPU, I don't have anything else that could take advantage of the x570 chipset for the time being, so my x470 is probably good to go for quite some time to come anyway. Reply
  • Gastec - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Ryzen 3000 series CPU prices are going to be over MSRP for at least 3 months. Reply
  • Targon - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    I don't know where you live, but here in the USA, the CPUs are all at the official prices, unless you go to a third party seller who is trying to scam money out of people. Note that many online stores show products from third parties in addition to what they sell themselves, so when you see CPU prices above MSRP, those are the third party scammers.

    Newegg is getting daily deliveries by the look of it, and I expect the other large online sources are as well. The sales volumes are high on these chips, and some people just take advantage of it and charge more money.
    Reply
  • Gastec - Saturday, July 13, 2019 - link

    On Amazon.es and PCComponentes.com the EXACT SAME price, set up by bots:
    AMD Ryzen 9 3900X, 548,90€
    AMD Ryzen 7 3700X: 361,80 €
    Reply
  • eva02langley - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    The only reason to buy x570 is for PCIe 4.0. If you don't need it, get a B450 board at 75$ Will work for every Ryzen 3000 CPUs.

    I am even thinking about using my X370 MSI Gaming Pro Carbon for my 3950x.
    Reply
  • npz - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    3950x likely won't work due power requirements. All the X570 boards preparing for it are implementing beefier power supplies/extra phases for VRM specifically to support it and any potential overclocking. It may have a higher platform power limit for PBO too Reply

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