Across multiple retailers today, Samsung's 970 EVO Plus 2TB internal SSD has dropped to a new all-time low price. It usually goes for around $290 but is available today for $250 at Amazon and Newegg.

This is the lowest official price we’ve ever come across for this model. We reviewed a smaller capacity SSD from the same line in 2019 when they first debuted. The biggest change between the 970 EVO Plus and the 970 EVO is the switch to 92-layer 3D NAND.

Samsung 970 EVO Plus 2TB SSD: was $290, now $250 at Amazon

This SSD, along with the other capacities in this line, features an M.2 2280 form factor. The read/write speed on the 2TB edition can reach up to 3500/3300 MB/s. They all connect using a PCIe Gen 3.0 x4 NVMe 1.3 interface.

According to the official specifications from Samsung, the 970 EVO Plus uses an in-house storage controller. Users have the option of installing Samsung Magician—a proprietary application from the manufacturer with drive management tools. They also offer a system called Dynamic Thermal Guard which monitors temperature changes to help with performance.

For added security, users can choose to implement 256-bit AES encryption to protect their data. The Samsung 970 EVO Plus comes with a 5-year limited warranty that voids after reaching 1200 TBW.

Visit the Samsung 970 EVO Plus 2TB SSD product page at Amazon or Newegg for more details and options to check out.

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  • mlkj - Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - link

    Please be careful, the Samsung 970 Evo Plus that Samsung is selling is not a regular 970 Evo Plus, it's a cut-down device sold under the same name and SKU.

    The new drive is about 50% slower, sustained. The new version of the datasheet has been purged of any performance number or reference to the exact controller used.

    Samsung states it "has decided to upgrade the controller and NAND".
    Samsung further seizes an opportunity to be insulting, writing "our devices will even better meet the growing needs of consumers and improve the overall user experience"
    Samsung blames the Covid epidemic for this behavior.
    Reply
  • Samus - Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - link

    I wish I could say I'm shocked, but this is unfortunate coming from a tier 1 vendor like Samsung. They are totally vertically integrated and control the entire supply chain for their SSD's. There is no legitimate excuse for changing components due to supply issues. THEY MAKE ALL THE COMPONENTS.

    This is the kind of behavior you expect out of Kingston.

    Meanwhile every other company that make all of their components don't do this crap: Crucial\Micron, WD (though their partner, Sandisk, DOES do this with their branded SSDs) and Hynix.
    Reply
  • Molor1880 - Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - link

    Texas shut off power to the Line S2 foundry where they make some of the memory controllers during the storm earlier this year and it took them over two months to get it back up and running at capacity. That they had to outsource components for their cheaper drives makes sense.

    Should have had a revision though.
    Reply
  • Leeea - Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - link

    WD totally does do it:
    https://www.techspot.com/news/90928-western-digita...

    https://www.extremetech.com/computing/326200-weste...

    https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/08/silent-cha...

    WD is no longer a safe brand.
    Reply
  • Leeea - Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - link

    Crucial is also guilty:
    https://www.tomshardware.com/features/crucial-p2-s...
    Reply
  • AnnonymousCoward - Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - link

    Good to know, thx. I wish companies would simply rev the part number! Reply
  • hob196 - Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - link

    Since anandtech seem to be happy implying this is close to the one they reviewed, here's an article covering this: https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/08/samsung-se... Reply
  • Billy Tallis - Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - link

    The drop in post-SLC cache sustained write performance has been demonstrated with the 1TB model, which has been switched from using 256Gbit 92L dies to 512Gbit 128L dies and thus has half as many dies to work with. The 2TB model was using 512Gbit dies to begin with, so upgrading from 92L to 128L should come with zero downsides and several improvements. Reply
  • Makaveli - Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - link

    When are they going to use 176L or do they not like Micron? Reply
  • hansmuff - Tuesday, September 14, 2021 - link

    Great comment. But I do wonder what the switch to QLC does to the drive's endurance, compared with TLC. Reply

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