As the world’s largest display suppliers are primarily focusing on popular sizes of LCDs, such as 27 or 32 inches, the smaller players tend to address and fulfil the demands of smaller niche markets.

IO Data, a Japanese supplier of monitors, this week formally announced its first 64.5-inch display. The M4K651XDB is aimed at a variety of applications, including desktop PCs, game consoles, and digital signage.

The IO Data M4K651XDB is based on a 64.5-inch ADS panel with a resolution of 3840×2160, 400 nits brightness, 1200:1 contrast ratio, 60 Hz refresh rate, 178° viewing angles, and a low 5-8 ms response time.

ADS panels are not used widely, but IO Data claims that its monitor can reproduce 1.07 billion colors (with 10-bit color input), so we are most probably dealing with an IPS-class panel with rather decent capabilities. Meanwhile, the manufacturer does not make mention of the color gamuts that the LCD supports. Given the fact that this is a PC monitor, sRGB support is a must, though there are no official claims about that.

The key selling feature of the M4K651XDB display is naturally its size that is 10 inches larger compared to 55-inch LCDs found in Japan and some other countries. The large dimension is also a double-edged sword for the monitor, because it has a rather large 0.3718 mm2 pixel area resulting in a pixel density of only 68.31 PPI, which is similar to that of 31.5-inch Full-HD displays that have never gained popularity. Obviously, IO Data’s display will hardly be a good choice for people looking for smooth fonts and pixel-level accuracy.

One of the notable features that the M4K651XDB has is an integrated processor that can upconvert SD and HD content to the LCD’s native Ultra-HD resolution without substantial blurring. The same chip is also allegedly responsible for the monitor’s Enhanced Color function that can improve colour saturation of an image. Finally, the display can also automatically adjust brightness according to environmental conditions, so the device is probably equipped with an ambient light sensor.

Like many modern monitors, IO Data’s M4K651XDB supports HDR10 transport, though the quality of the HDR experience is something that remains to be seen give the display’s peak brightness of only 400 nits. Meanwhile, despite being positioned as a solution for gaming, the LCD does not support any dynamic refresh rate technologies.

Moving on to audio capabilities of the monitor. The M4K651XDB is outfitted with two 10 W stereo speakers, a 3.5-mm headphone jack, and an optical connector.

As for general connectivity, the LCD features one DisplayPort 1.2 input, one HDMI 2.0 input, as well as two HDMI 1.4 inputs. The HDMI ports fully support CEC, so the remote bundled with the display can control various consumer electronics devices and therefore the 64.5-inch beast can be used as a regular TV once attached to a BD player or an STB.

Unfortunately, the only USB connector on the monitor seems to be able to serve as a maintenance port for firmware updates as it cannot serve as USB hub, and likely lacks any OS or hardware that would be capable of playback of media off external storage.

IO Data's 64.5-Inch UHD Display
  M4K651XDB
Panel 64.5" ADS
Native Resolution 3840×2160
Maximum Refresh Rate 60 Hz
Response Time 5 - 8 ms
Brightness 400 cd/m²
Contrast 1200:1
Viewing Angles 178°/178° horizontal/vertical
Pixel Pitch 0.3718 mm2
Pixel Density 68.31 ppi
Color Gamut 1.07 billion
Inputs 1 × DisplayPort 1.2
1 × HDMI 2.0
2 × HDMI 1.4
Outputs 3.5 mm headphone output
SPDIF
USB Hub None
Audio 10 W × 2
Power Consumption (idle/active) Idle: 0.5 W
Typical: 89.4 W
Max: 225 W
Modes Web, Photo, Movies, etc.
Launch Price ¥168,000 ($1,483)

IO Data’s M4K651XDB will ship in January at an MSRP of ¥168,000 ($1,483) without taxes. Given the features of the product, this price seems quite high. In the meantime, the manufacturer covers the display with a five-year warranty and guarantees that the backlight will operate for 30,000 hours, which equals to ~3.42 years of continuous operation (Yes that is a weird selling point).

Related Reading:

Source: IO Data (via Hermitage Akihabara)

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  • Trefugl - Thursday, December 13, 2018 - link

    If it were 40-43in I'd be interested... 65in 4K is too large with too low a DPI for use as a monitor. I suppose there are people wanting it for an HTPC, but for me, it's on the small size for that rolle and I'll just stick with my 105" projector for that. Reply
  • remosito - Friday, December 14, 2018 - link

    I have a 40 incher and wish it were bigger. Though 65 is a tad to big I agree. I'd really like a 55"er. Reply
  • JoeyJoJo123 - Thursday, December 13, 2018 - link

    For what it's worth, I like the old-school remote. Reply
  • edzieba - Thursday, December 13, 2018 - link

    Can we stop even pretending that a display that "supports HDR10 transport" had even the vaguest relation to an actual HDR display? Nobody accepts that a 704x480 display that "accepts 1080p" is in any way a HD display, and the situation here is no different. Reply
  • npz - Thursday, December 13, 2018 - link

    Well, 400 nits meets the minimum VESA DisplayHDR level HDR (from 400, 600, 1000) so it's a compromise between not having the full dynamic range and simply not properly displaying the content at all. Reply
  • edzieba - Friday, December 14, 2018 - link

    That's more a problem of VESA watering down their standard to the point of uselessness. Only DisplayHDR 1000 is even close to being a useful label Reply
  • Lord of the Bored - Saturday, December 15, 2018 - link

    I'd argue that HDR400 is a useful label with a bad name.

    Knowing what the display can do is useful information. That they apply the HDR label to a display that isn't is misleading, and HDR400 isn't a great finish line for a product, but it carries useful information. You know what it can do. And by the fact that it isn't HDR600, you know what it CAN'T do.

    I'd call that a way better situation than the "2-ms response time, 1000000:1 contrast ratio" labels everywhere else on the box.
    Reply
  • oRAirwolf - Thursday, December 13, 2018 - link

    Still impatiently waiting for the Nvidia BFGD's to come out. Preferably in the 40 to 50 inch range, with FALD, quantum dot lighting, and VA panels. I'll pay whatever they ask for one of those. Reply
  • Diji1 - Friday, December 14, 2018 - link

    AFAIK those will only be 65" Reply
  • npz - Thursday, December 13, 2018 - link

    Perfect for a living room HTPC, gaming display or conference room monitor. At least one would never have to scale.

    > Obviously, IO Data’s display will hardly be a good choice for people looking for smooth fonts and pixel-level accuracy.

    Most traditional CJK fonts are bitmap fonts or truetype using bytecode interpreter so pixel accuracy would be very good. They are designed to be grid aligned from the start and are terrible for scaling and not designed for anti-aliasing (ie. blurring) that's typical of smaller PC monitor DPIs
    Reply

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