In this interesting world where processors are released but not formally announced, it means that when diving through the lists of supported CPUs on certain motherboards, we might find processors we have never heard of before. Thanks to some sleuthing on Twitter by one of our followers, we can detail that AMD has two new 35W Ryzen processors that we previously did not know about.

Over on the ASUS Crosshair VII Hero CPU supported list, the two new processors are listed, supported as of BIOS 0509:

Traditionally AMD uses the Athlon name for its combined CPU/GPU processors that have the GPU disabled (which AMD calls its NPUs, or non-accelerated processing units). What makes this interesting is that based on Geekbench data already submitted to the results database (on an ASUS B350M motherboard), these parts both have integrated graphics.

Between the two sources, it shows that the processors are essentially identical, with the difference in the Pro variant being that it falls under AMD’s commercial brand for customer support. The part then is a dual core processor with hyperthreading, running at a base frequency of 3.2 GHz, at a 35W TDP, and either 2 MB or 4 MB of L3 cache (both sources state something different: ASUS lists 4 MB, which is usually more accurate). Neither source states a turbo frequency, so it might come to pass that the Athlon processors do not have any turbo, but also missing is the information about the integrated graphics. Neither ASUS’ support list nor Geekbench traditionally lists this data. Geekbench does list it as a Raven Ridge part (which makes sense, being a CPU+GPU design), which would also mean it is built on 14nm.

Ryzen APUs
AnandTech Cores Base Turbo GPU TDP
Mobile
Ryzen 7 2700U   4C / 8T 2.5 GHz 3.4 GHz Vega 10 15 W
Ryzen 7 2700U Pro 4C / 8T 2.2 GHz 3.8 GHz Vega 10 15 W
Ryzen 5 2500U   4C / 8T 2.0 GHz 3.6 GHz Vega 8 15 W
Ryzen 5 2500U Pro 4C / 8T 2.0 GHz 3.6 GHz Vega 8 15 W
Ryzen 3 2300U   4C / 4T 2.5 GHz 3.4 GHz Vega 3 15 W
Ryzen 3 2300U Pro 4C / 4T 2.5 GHz 3.4 GHz Vega 6 15 W
Desktop
Ryzen 5 2400G   4C / 8T 3.6 GHz 3.9 GHz Vega 11 65 W
Ryzen 5 2400G Pro 4C / 8T 3.6 GHz 3.9 GHz Vega 11 65 W
Ryzen 5 2400GE   4C / 8T 3.2 GHz 3.8 GHz Vega 11 35 W
Ryzen 5 2400GE Pro 4C / 8T 3.2 GHz 3.8 GHz Vega 11 35 W
Ryzen 3 2200G   4C / 4T 3.5 GHz 3.7 GHz Vega 8 65 W
Ryzen 3 2200G Pro 4C / 4T 3.5 GHz 3.7 GHz Vega 8 65 W
Ryzen 3 2200GE   4C / 4T 3.2 GHz 3.6 GHz Vega 8 35 W
Ryzen 3 2200GE Pro 4C / 4T 3.2 GHz 3.6 GHz Vega 8 35 W
Athlon 200GE
YD200GC6M2OFB
  2C / 4T 3.2 GHz ? ? 35 W
Athlon Pro 200GE
YD200GC6M20FB
Pro 2C / 4T 3.2 GHz ? ? 35 W

Normally when processors are not announced with the rest of the set, it means one of two things. First, they are not important for the story, and so from a PR perspective it makes sense to the company to leave them out of materials (no matter how much that bothers the media), or that these processors are ‘off-roadmap’, and are built to order from a specific customer. At this point we are unsure of where AMD stands on these parts.

It is worth noting that these parts do not have the ‘Ryzen’ name in them.

Given the fact that it is a long weekend in the US, while we have reached out to our contacts at AMD, we are not expecting a response until Tuesday. More information as we get it.

Update: Computerbase.de reports that these two new processors are set to be announced at Computex, and that both of these parts have Vega 3 graphics.

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  • rocky12345 - Saturday, May 26, 2018 - link

    They never mentioned them because no one wants them other than OEMS that want to make cheap systems and market them as powerful computers when in fact they are almost useless other than basic tasks. I wondered how long it would be before the dusted off the Athlon name for the Ryzens's. Reply
  • Hul8 - Saturday, May 26, 2018 - link

    Unlike the enthusiast bubble that people on sites like this live in, a lot of people have computing needs that only involve basic tasks. Reply
  • chobao - Saturday, May 26, 2018 - link

    there are plenty of low power applications these processors can be used in.

    for example: look at the amount of intel baytrail and cherry trail low power cpus...in the market..in random devices from china.

    I recently bought these small machines for a client..$50 each..with a intel..cherry trail...along with 2gb of ram and 32gb..and win 10.... p.s...out of the ten i bought..6 died..haha...:

    anyways..low power cpus are nice in low power applications that don't require much power.

    companies dont market them as powerful computers, it is the sales guys and odms that market them like that.

    If u rip apart a barracuda webfilter you will find a athlon in it :) ( not sure if you knw wht tht is tho).

    cheers
    cho
    Reply
  • WorldWithoutMadness - Saturday, May 26, 2018 - link

    That's a very low power one, this one is 35W. Reply
  • lmcd - Monday, May 28, 2018 - link

    I mean the price point is sometimes what fit about Cherry Trail, not just its TDP. This processor would compete at the same price point. Reply
  • Nintendo Maniac 64 - Saturday, May 26, 2018 - link

    Yet those 2c/4t Pentiums sure seem quite popular in budget builds, and this seems to be AMD's answer to that. Reply
  • tyaty1 - Sunday, June 10, 2018 - link

    It was pretty much meant to phase out the 28nm Bristol Ridge. Reply
  • 0ldman79 - Saturday, May 26, 2018 - link

    There are plenty of places where they'd be useful.

    Not everything is about performance. Sometimes power is the primary driver with performance being secondary. This would be a good deal faster than any Atom or Jaguar, now lets see how they rank against an i3.

    Drop the clock down and see if we can have a dual core Ryzen running 5W or less. That would make for an interesting firewall, wireless AP, etc...
    Reply
  • stephenbrooks - Saturday, May 26, 2018 - link

    These would be a good fit with the up-to-47W ~$15 passive heatsink mentioned in another recent article. Cheap and silent and perfectly usable... Reply
  • Nintendo Maniac 64 - Saturday, May 26, 2018 - link

    This to me looks like AMD's answer to the ever-popular 2c/4t Pentium chips (such as the G4560).

    Pentium vs Athlon, round...uhh, 5? 6? It's been a while...
    Reply

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