Fujitsu has introduced its new Lifebook U937/P notebook that weighs under 800 grams (1.76 lbs), but offers a fully-fledged Intel Core i5 Kaby Lake-U processor as well as a 13.3” display with FHD resolution. The notebook is designed for business users and thus comes with features like a fingerprint reader.

Fujitsu did not announce many details about its Lifebook U937/P, but only said that the laptop is based on the 7th generation Intel Core processor (which, given the timing of the announcement, implies on the Kaby Lake-U), weighs less than 799 grams (1.76 lbs) in its default configuration, is 15.5 mm thick and comes in black or red. 

Despite the introduction, no real details other than those above were disclosed. Despite this, a lower weight notebook for the Japan market was also disclosed - the Lifebook UH75/B1. This is a lower-cost laptop, that is also 15.5 mm thick but weighs only 777 grams (1.71 lbs).

Specifications of the Fujitsu Lifebook UH75/B1 will hardly exactly match specs of the Lifebook U937/P since the systems are priced differently, but they give an idea what to expect. The UH71/B1 notebook is based on the Intel Core i5-7200U (2C/4T, 2.5 GHz, HD Graphics 620) SoC and is equipped with 4 GB of DDR4-2133 memory (Ian: is that single channel?) as well as a 128 GB SSD. When it comes to input/output capabilities, the Lifebook UH75/B1 offers a 802.11ac Wi-Fi + BT 4.1 wireless module, three USB 3.0 ports (two Type-A, one Type-C), an SD card reader, an HDMI output, a TRRS audio connector, a webcam and a fingerprint reader. As for the battery, the notebook comes with a 25 Wh accumulator that can power it for eight hours.

Fujitsu Lifebook UH General Specifications
  UH75/B1
(Japan Only)
U937/P
(Regions unconfirmed)
Display 13.3" non-glossy panel with 1920×1080 resolution
SoC Intel Core i5-7200U
2C/4T,
2.5-3.1 GHz,
15W,
Intel HD 620
Kaby Lake-U
RAM 4 GB DDR4-2133 Probably 8GB+?
Storage 128 GB SSD Probably 256GB+ ?
Camera 720p webcam Maybe FHD?
Wireless  802.11ac Wi-Fi
Bluetooth 4.1
I/O ports 2 × USB 3.0 Type-A
1 × USB 3.0 Type-C
1 × HDMI
Audio Integrated speakers
1 × TRRS 3.5-mm jack for headset
Dimensions 309 × 212 × 15.5 mm
Weight 777 grams 799 grams
Battery 25 Wh 25 Wh?
OS Windows 10 Home Win10 Home/Pro?
Fingerprint Yes
Finish Red
Black
Availability February 2017
¥190,000 (~$1660)
February 2017
¥284,900 (~$2486)

The Lifebook U937/P and the Lifebook UH75/B1 are among the lightest 13.3” laptops ever produced and will be among the lightest on the market. At the same time, it is noteworthy that the UH75/B1 only has 4 GB of memory and 128 GB of storage space, which is not a lot by today’s standards and may be considered not enough by many users on the go. By contrast, Samsung’s recently updated Notebook 9 weighs 816 grams, but comes with 8-16 GB of DDR4 and a 256 GB SSD. Moreover, Lenovo’s LaVie Z (introduced in 2015) not only had more memory and a larger SSD, but also a higher screen resolution. On the other hand, ultrathin and ultralight laptops are usually full of compromises because various people have different requirements and fulfilling requests of one group means introducing limitations for another. The one common feature through these is that the sub-1.8 lb laptop market is dominated mostly by entrants focusing on the Japanese market.

Fujitsu plans to start selling the Lifebook UH75/B1 in Japan in mid-February for ¥190,000 (~$1660). ETA of the Lifebook U937/P is February, but we do not know whether it is early or late in the month. Meanwhile, the price of the product will be ¥284,900 (~$2486), which is considerably higher than the price of the UH75/B1 and implies on better specifications (e.g., a better SoC, more memory, a higher capacity SSD, etc.).

Related Reading:

Sources: Fujitsu, PC Watch.

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  • stanleyipkiss - Thursday, January 19, 2017 - link

    Other manufacturers should take note here: two Type A USB, SD card reader and HDMI out. It's not that hard. Reply
  • id4andrei - Thursday, January 19, 2017 - link

    On other sides it also had pull-out LAN and check the keyboard. Full size arrow keys, decent spacing and a big fat Enter key. Miniaturization can make room for ergonomics. Reply
  • ddriver - Thursday, January 19, 2017 - link

    I for one applaud the enter key and the "other than usb c/thunderbolt" connectivity. I never owned a fujitsu product, but it looks like I could in the near future. Reply
  • ingwe - Thursday, January 19, 2017 - link

    I get that people do want other ports. For me, I want to have at least two type C connectors in the next laptop I buy since I tend to hold onto my laptops for a while (I'm still using a 2008 Macbook Pro). Reply
  • bigboxes - Thursday, January 19, 2017 - link

    I want USB-C ports as well. We have to push this forward. At most I want a single Type A port. Time to start buying the different cables and be done with this. Type C is so superior. Change is painful at times. We're getting to the "rip off the band-aid" moment. Reply
  • ddriver - Friday, January 20, 2017 - link

    Idiot proof is not superior. I know that people have a hard time thinking, and for many it is a challenge to figure which way the usb connector goes, but if we "solve" that, people will become even dumber absent those daily "challenges".

    The C port is not superior technologically, it doesn't offer higher transfer rates or latency, it is not physically stronger, nor less prone to damage. it is just fool-proof and over-hyped, with the latter being mostly due to the price premium for C type peripherals and cables to A type plus the actual need to either replace hardware or buy additional clunky adapters.

    So pardon my lack of excitement. Not that it is necessarily bad, I am OK with C type ports on devices as long as they aren't the only option, what's bad is that it is being forced for the sole purpose of more profits. Yeah, not the typical exemplary cattle here, eager to be milked, my priorities go a tad beyond "woot, new stuff therefore great, must buy and hype to feel smarter".
    Reply
  • tuxRoller - Friday, January 20, 2017 - link

    The type c connector has greater durability 10000 mating cycles vs 1500 for type a), designed to scale well beyond 10Gb, and it's smaller.

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/8377/usb-typec-conne...

    It also is designed for far greater versatility when paired with the pd 2 and alt modes.
    In the meantime, we'll have to deal with dongles, adaptors, and doohickeys.

    So, I think the excitement is completely warranted since it is actually being taken up by a wide range of vendor types and the possibility of actually achieving a convergence for connector types on various ces is exciting.
    Reply
  • emn13 - Friday, January 20, 2017 - link

    1500 cycles isn't nothing - that's once a day for years. Furthermore, though I obviously haven't counted, several ancients phones friends still use (android 2 era) with batteries decrepit enough to require several loads a day have never once seen a port break through wear - so I'm not convinced that actual type A ports in current use actually have such a low endurance, despite the design aims.

    Personally, I wouldn't mind a port that's symmetric, but it's going to be long & slow replacement - the improvements are simply too slight, and the switching costs non negligible. I'd guess there's a realistic chance type C never really catches on, if something new comes along soon enough.
    Reply
  • tuxRoller - Saturday, January 21, 2017 - link

    Your anecdotal experiences, keep in mind I was responding to specific claims from derived.
    Also, imho, people didn't fixate on the symmetry of type c, but the NEW features it brings. That's the big deal, and that's why I'm glad to see the manufacturers moving fairly quickly towards its adoption.
    Unfortunately, not all industries are fully on board (notably TV/media devices). I'd really love to see HDMI either go away, or map their protocol to type c.
    Reply
  • BrokenCrayons - Friday, January 20, 2017 - link

    No one is going to get dumber, somehow losing intellect because they don't have to decide whether or not to flip over a cable's connector to plug an external device into a computer. If you honestly believe that the opposite is true, then maybe it's not everyone else that needs more daily challenges to their intellect. Reply

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