Small cards and small systems are always exciting to see, especially if there’s an avenue to create a nice PC within a small volume at multiple price points. There are a number of angles to go with this, from the silent runner all the way up to the overstated ‘look-at-me’ RGB custom builds that appear as part of marketing presentations at trade shows. It still requires having access to a good number of components in that form factor, which includes smaller and smaller graphics cards. Graphics cards built to work with the ITX form factor is part of that, going for a 17nm design that fits into any mini-ITX build (or with a riser cable, only just above the CPU slot), and Powercolor is launching its new RX 5600 XT option.

This new AXRX 5600 ITX 6GBD6-2DH GPU, set to retail at $299 from today, is 175mm in length and offers three video outputs: one HDMI and two DisplayPort connections. The dual slot card has three heatpipes and an unassuming façade – the GPU underneath is standard RX 5600 XT faire, with 2304 SPs, a 1355 MHz base clock, a 1560 MHz ‘game’ clock, and a boost clock up to 1620 MHz. The 8 GB of memory is rated at 14 Gbps, up from the 12 Gbps reference design, and the GPU supports PCIe 4.0 connectivity. It requires one 8-pin connector, and Powercolor recommends a minimum 500W power supply.

Source: Powercolor

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  • Valantar - Tuesday, May 12, 2020 - link

    There's no way to make an LP card with a die that large (even the 1660Ti would likely be impossible) - there simply isn't room in a HHHL card for the die, the VRAM traces and the VRAM packages where they need to be positioned, let alone the VRM and all other ancillary circuitry. That is the main reason there are no high end LP cards. LP cards need a small die and package (well, a large die on a small package could work I guess, there just aren't any) and 2 memory packages, possibly 4 with some very clever trace routing. But no more. Also, even a 6-pin PCIe power connector eats a lot of board area at those sizes, so going above 75W is pretty much a no-go. Reply
  • thetrashcanisfull - Tuesday, May 12, 2020 - link

    There are huge differences in power/heat - and consequently clockspeeds and performance - between desktop and laptop cards, even with the same name. For example, the 2080 Max-Q (which is the variant you will see in most thin laptops) only offers between 60-80% of the performance of the regular desktop 2080 (https://www.notebookcheck.net/GeForce-RTX-2080-Des... Reply
  • a5cent - Tuesday, May 12, 2020 - link

    The best mobile and best desktop chips get the same model name, but aren't really comparable technologically. You aren't getting desktop performance in a laptop, not even in the chunky ones. Reply
  • zodiacfml - Wednesday, May 13, 2020 - link

    Because they don't want lower cards with HIGH clocks/TDPs to approach or equal the performance of GPUs with more cores. It's an arms race so it is rare for a single fan/low-profile cards to exist even in low end cards such as the RX 570. I have a Vega 56 with a short PCB but the cooler is almost twice its length Reply
  • Rookierookie - Wednesday, May 13, 2020 - link

    The mobile RTX 2080 is slower than the desktop 2060. Reply
  • The_Assimilator - Wednesday, May 13, 2020 - link

    The GPUs used in laptops are insanely binned, heavily undervolted and downclocked, and have BIOSes that massively restrict their power limits compared to desktop. The silicon may be the same, but everything else is different. Reply
  • Samus - Tuesday, May 12, 2020 - link

    If companies are going to make cards with mITX in mind, they need to at least put blower-style coolers on them. Considering the tiny volume of most ITX cases, how the hell do they expect to displace 250W of heat on top of the heat produced by the other components. Blow it directly out of the case! Reply
  • dromoxen - Wednesday, May 13, 2020 - link

    250w of heat is excessive .. more likely 150-170w . But blower cards are disliked by many .. they tend to be louder and noisier than the twin fan counterparts Reply
  • DanNeely - Wednesday, May 13, 2020 - link

    Isn't that why a a lot of mITX gaming cases put a giant grill facing the GPU to give it direct airflow to the outside? Reply
  • lmcd - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - link

    Yea literally every cube ITX case has a giant grill about an inch away. Silverstone's taller ITX cases often rotate the GPU with a riser for similar effect. Reply

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