AMD on Tuesday introduced one of the industry’s most affordable professional graphics cards with drivers certified by leading vendors of CAD/CAM software. The Radeon Pro WX 3200 comes in a low-profile single-slot form-factor and can address the most compact workstations available today.

The AMD Radeon Pro WX 3200 is based on the company's Polaris architecture GPU featuring 640 stream processors that offers up to 1.66 TFLOPS of single precision compute performance. The card carries 4 GB of GDDR5 memory and has four mini DisplayPort 1.4 outputs to drive four 4K displays, or two 5K monitors, or one 8K LCD.

The Radeon Pro WX 3200 card fully supports 10-bit color required by professional graphics applications. Since the board is designed for mainstream CAD/CAM projects it comes with certificates from such ISVs as Adobe, Autodesk, Dassault, Siemens, and others for Windows 10 and Linux operating systems.

Since the card is extremely small (it is just 6.6 inch/168 mm long), it is compatible with almost any desktop workstation that has a PCIe 3.0 x16 slot and can supply up to 50 W of power to the board.

AMD’s Radeon Pro WX 3200 replaces the company’s Radeon Pro WX 3100 board introduced two years ago and brings in enhanced performance along with refined software. Just like its predecessor, the new card will retail for $199

Related Reading:

Source: AMD

POST A COMMENT

44 Comments

View All Comments

  • mode_13h - Thursday, July 04, 2019 - link

    You might want to see them, but I don't want to hear them. And gamers won't want to OC them.

    I think there are good reasons gamer cards are >= 2 slots.

    Also, consider that the pro cards typically have lower clocks.
    Reply
  • V900 - Wednesday, July 03, 2019 - link

    Is the performance really enough for anyone who needs a professional card though?

    AMD might have been a little to eager here and priced it too low.

    Both AMD and Nvidia have been able to make a fortune over the years by taking their regular 300$ chips, adding some ECC RAM and selling them for thousands.
    Reply
  • npz - Wednesday, July 03, 2019 - link

    Professional cards that are not used for final rendering really rely more on the geometry and lighting side of the gpu pipeline, for working in the viewport, while the gaming cards focus on the shaders and ROPs and compute or gpu accelerated final rendering on the shaders. Driver optimization also helps.

    I experienced the difference for myself when I used a gaming Nvidia long ago for some 3D modeling preview. With just wireframe, it was terrible. It was totally non-accelerated, making moving the wireframe object completely stutter with artificats (btw part of workstation focus is to ensure visual accuracy)... but throw on some textured shading, then suddenly everything is accelerated and I can spin and move the model around smoothly
    Reply
  • mode_13h - Thursday, July 04, 2019 - link

    The professional cards use the exact same underlying GPU chips as the gaming cards. It's been this way for ages. Reply
  • mode_13h - Thursday, July 04, 2019 - link

    A lot of professional use cases don't require any special GPU. The only reason even to use a dGPU is because Intel Xeon W and Ryzen non-G series lack an iGPU.

    Nvidia's Quadro range goes right the way down to a GTX 1030-equivalent - the P400. 256 CUDA cores, 2 GB (thankfully GDDR5, unlike my Quadro K620), 0.64 fp32 TFLOPS, 30 W.
    Reply
  • mode_13h - Thursday, July 04, 2019 - link

    I should add that OEMs like Dell don't even offer non-workstation cards in their workstation chassis. So, if your reason for buying one of those machines doesn't involve any interactive rendering or GPU-compute, then you select a low-end professional card. Reply
  • mode_13h - Thursday, July 04, 2019 - link

    Not all Nvidia Quadros offer ECC RAM. It's only mentioned on the datasheets of the RTX 5000, 6000, and 8000 and the GV100. I'm pretty sure that's no oversight, for the others. Reply
  • LarsBars - Thursday, July 04, 2019 - link

    The WX 3100's display controller can support up to five displays. While this article says four, I would be surprised if it weren't 5. Reply
  • phoenix_rizzen - Thursday, July 04, 2019 - link

    According to the specs from AMD's site it's only 4:

    Display Outputs
    DisplayPort: 4x Mini-DisplayPort 1.4
    HDMI™: None
    DVI: None
    VGA: None
    Reply
  • phoenix_rizzen - Friday, July 05, 2019 - link

    From the article:
    The AMD Radeon Pro WX 3200 is based on the company's Polaris architecture GPU featuring 640 stream processors that offers up to 1.66 TFLOPS of single precision compute performance.

    From AMD's site:
    Peak Single Precision (FP32) Performance
    3.3 TFLOPs

    Peak Double Precision (FP64) Performance
    104 GFLOPs
    Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now