MSI MPG X570 Gaming Pro Carbon WIFI

The MSI MPG X570 Gaming Pro Carbon WIFI marks a shift from the company offering two versions of the same model: one with Wi-Fi and one without - this board is only available with Wi-Fi, This model represents its top tier gaming focused model, and its notable features include two PCIe 4.0 M.2 slots, a Realtek ALC1220 HD audio codec, Intel Gigabit NIC, and a Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax wireless interface.

On the aesthetic of the MSI MPG X570 Gaming Pro Carbon WIFI motherboard, it includes a black carbon inspired design with a uniformed X570 chipset heatsink with the two M.2 heatsinks fitting in well with the rest of the board. Both the PCIe 4.0 M.2 slots include their own individual M.2 heatshield and the Frozr chipset heatsink which includes a fan which means the X570 chipset is actively cooled. In the top right-hand corner of the PCB is four RAM slots with support for up to DDR4-4400 with up to 128 GB of capacity. In addition to the two PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 slots, MSI has also included six SATA ports; four with right-angled connectors, and two straight-angled located directly below the chipset heatsink. Included are two full-length PCIe 4.0 slots which operate at x16 and x8/x4 which allows users to use two way AMD CrossFire multi-graphics configurations. There are also two additional PCIe 3.0 x1 slots. 

MSI is using Intel's new AX200 802.11ax Wi-Fi adapter with speeds capable of up to 2.4 Gbps and antenna ports are included on the rear panel. The rear panel also includes three USB 3.1 G2 Type-A, one USB 3.1 G2 Type-C, two USB 3.1 G1 Type-A, and two USB 2.0 ports. Also on the rear panel is an HDMI video output for users looking to install a Ryzen based APU, a PS/2 combo port and a BIOS flashback button. This is in addition to an Intel I211-AT Gigabit NIC controlling the single Ethernet port.

The MSI MPG X570 Gaming Pro Carbon WIFI has an MSRP of $259 which puts it right into the mid-range market segment. With a range of features, an integrated Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax wireless interface and a neutral aesthetic, it looks pretty good. The only niggle is that other vendors for the same price are implementing better NICs such as Realtek's RTL8125 2.5 Gigabit NIC and based on that, other models could make more appeal. The MPG X570 Gaming Pro Carbon, however, is a no-frills and no fuss option for gamers to sink their teeth into.

MSI Prestige X570 Creation MSI MPG X570 Gaming Edge WIFI
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  • MrSpadge - Tuesday, July 09, 2019 - link

    +1 Reply
  • bunkle - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    The controller column includes the total number of phases supported split between CPU cores and SoC e.g. (6+1) = 6 CPU phase and 1 SoC phase. More is *usually* better but has diminishing returns regarding tighter and tighter voltage regulation. Some controllers are better than others (can operate at high frequency e.g. 500KHz v 1000KHz, include other features to improve performance) mitigating the need for more phases.

    Each phase is a buck converter comprised of a low/high side MOSFET (can be integrated in a single package) and choke. Some controllers can support doubling up the PWM signal to driver more MOSFETs. Doublers can also be added as discrete components if not built into the controller.

    Current rating of the MOSFET (e.g. Sic639=40A IR3555=60A) indicates the total power deliverable. MOSFETs are not 100% efficient and vary in efficiency. The more current they provide the hotter they get and the less efficient they become, with better MOSFETs producing less heat for a given current. Thus using doubles can improve temperatures and efficiency without the benefits of the tighter voltage tolerance that *real* phases provide.

    Hope that’s helpful!
    Reply
  • bunkle - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    A lot more detailed explanation: https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/voltage_regulator_mod... Reply
  • bug77 - Tuesday, July 09, 2019 - link

    The description for AsRock X570(M) Pro4 says "5 jack + 1 SPDIF". Unfortunately, those boards lack SPDIF and only come with 3 jacks ;) Reply
  • Smell This - Tuesday, July 09, 2019 - link

    I'm thinking the *ASRock Thunderbolt AIC* ...
    https://thunderbolttechnology.net/product/asrock-t...
    would cover all your TBT peripheral needs, including optical.
    Reply
  • DanNeely - Tuesday, July 09, 2019 - link

    Do X570 boards still need an extra chip per USB port to support USB-C reversibility?

    The additional expense and needed PCB space were cited as among the reasons why earlier generation boards (IIRC both Intel and AMD) almost never had more than 1 C port; but it was never clear to me if that was an inherent implementation penalty for the C port or an artifact of Intel's tech stack being stalled out and AMD outsourcing to ASMedia which built the chipsets on an ancient (55nm) platform.
    Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Tuesday, July 09, 2019 - link

    Gavin - X370 and X470 only supported PCIe 2.0. The connection between the CPU and chipset was 3.0, but all the ports on the chipset were 2.0. Reply
  • Spoelie - Tuesday, July 09, 2019 - link

    Is there any information on the performance of the Ryzen 3000 series on X/B400 series chipsets? Assuming that the power delivery is up to snuff and the bios is updated, will performance be similar and the only thing lacking vs X570 the connectivity upgrades? Or are there again some features that are exclusive to the newer chipsets like PBO2 or ... Reply
  • haukionkannel - Tuesday, July 09, 2019 - link

    There Are some test and the the speed is the same. You only miss that pci 4.0... and that is not so big deal in anyway. One video in YouTube shows Ryzen 3900 running in 350 based motherboard quite nicely. He did not try to overclock the cpu though... Reply
  • npz - Tuesday, July 09, 2019 - link

    From the article and also emphasized previously:
    "Notably motherboard vendors have said that the upcoming 16-core Ryzen 9 3950X was the baseline for which the new VRM designs were validated against. In particular, this means using better heatsinks so that the MOSFETs themselves can keep their collective cool."

    I've used higher end Ryzens on lower end boards and while they can run stock, they cannnot overclock worth a damn. And even at stock, the VRMs get very very hot. Note that PBO (or PB2 here) also overvolts, unlike XFR2 alone. So enabling that pushes those mosfets even further. I would not trust running the 3900x and 3950x on older boards, except maybe for the highest of higher end mobos that do not use doublers (and count them as phases) for VRMs. True phases will cut the temps in half.
    Reply

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