ASUS TUF Gaming X570-Plus & X570-Plus WIFI

The ASUS TUF Gaming X570-Plus and TUF Gaming X570-Plus Wi-Fi motherboards both contain the same core componentry with a 12+2 phase power delivery, actively cooled X570 chipset heatsink, a Realtek S1200A HD audio codec, and both feature the new Realtek L8200A Gigabit LAN which is exclusive to ASUS at present. The only difference between the two models is that the TUF Gaming X570-Plus WIFI includes an Intel AC 9260 802.11ac wireless interface with BT 5.0 support included.

On the design, the aesthetic is reminiscent of previous TUF Gaming branded models with a grey and black patterned printing on the PCB, with grey industrial looking heatsinks. There are four memory slots with support for ECC and non-ECC DDR4 memory with a maximum capacity of up to 128 GB. The ASUS TUF Gaming X570-Plus pairing also includes two full-length PCIe 4.0 slots which run at x16 and x16/x4. 

Included on the rear panel is an HDMI 1.4b, and DisplayPort video output, with two USB 3.1 G2 Type-A, and one USB 3.1 G2 Type-C port; also featured are four USB 3.1 G1 Type-A ports. A new addition to Realtek's NIC line up and exclusive to ASUS is an L8200A Gigabit NIC, with the WIFI model including an Intel AC 9260 802.11ac wireless interface. The five 3.5 mm audio jacks and S/PDIF optical output are controlled by a Realtek ALC1200A HD audio codec, and finishing off the rear panel is a PS/2 combo port for legacy keyboard and mice.

Both the ASUS TUF Gaming X570-Plus and TUF Gaming X570-Plus WIFI models represent its gaming-inspired entry level; ASUS rebranded the TUF series from durable and robust models, to more accessible models with a more modest outlay when compared to the Strix series. The ASUS TUF Gaming X570-Plus has an MSRP of $170, while the WIFI enabled version is slightly more expensive with an MSRP of $185.

ASUS ROG Strix X570-I Gaming ASUS Pro WS X570-Ace
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  • npz - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Well, you do have one choice, the GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Xtreme is fanless.
    I doubt they are that loud as they were in the past though, as it's a variable speed fan now.
    Reply
  • FreckledTrout - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    I'm waiting for the next iteration of board for this reason. I'm speculating the next round the chipset will be on 7nm. Reply
  • abufrejoval - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    The genious about that chiplet design is that the chipset doesn't actually benefit nearly as much from the shrink, as pure logic or SLC caches: The monolithic guys pay the 7nm overhead (e.g. EUV) for I/O while the geometry of the transistors in the I/O area is mostly determined by the need to power long motherbord or even slot traces.

    So while waiting is never a bad idea when your need clearly isn't overwhelming you, waiting for that shrink could turn out rather long. These days I/O heave chips might never be done in smaller geometries, because of that and because packaging has matured.
    Reply
  • Mr Perfect - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Yeah, I'm having flashbacks over here. Weedy little fans screaming along at 6000RPM, then choking up on a dust bunny or wearing out the bearing.

    Do we know what process they used for the X570? Is it the same 55nm they used for the X470? Here's hoping they shrink it a little for X670.
    Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    14nm Reply
  • erotomania - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    55nm Reply
  • DanNeely - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    no. X470 and below were 55nm (designed by ASMedia on an ancient process to keep everything cheap as dirt), X570 was done in house on 14nm. Ryzen 3's IO die is also 14nm (the much larger Epyc one was done at 12nm). Reply
  • erotomania - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Weedy, man! Those weedy fans Reply
  • sing_electric - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Given how little chipsets benefit from process shrinks, some part of me honestly wonders if there's any sense in going even further back to the future and dividing the chipset into a north/southbridge (or some other similar config) so that the heat can at least be spread out, getting rid of the need for a failure-prone mechanical part on your motherboard. Reply
  • YoloPascual - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    z77 extreme 4 to x570 extreme 4 👊👊 Reply

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