ASRock X570 Pro4 & X570M Pro4

ASRock unveiled a number of its X570 models during Computex 2019: a lot of gaming-focused models, and some extremely high-end offerings, but the ATX sized ASRock X570 Pro4 and microATX X570M Pro4 looks set to offer users less bling and more functionality at a lower price point.

Starting with the design of the ASRock X570 Pro4 and X570M Pro4 models, both models use the same silver and black theme throughout, with shining silver heatsinks, and a solid looking aluminium rear panel cover which doubles up as the power delivery heatsink. Both the ATX and microATX models use the same 10-phase power delivery, with both opting to use a single 8-pin 12 V EPS CPU power input. Both have dual PCIe 4.0 M.2 slots with one M.2 heatsink, with eight SATA ports, and both also use an Intel Gigabit LAN port, and a Realtek ALC1220 HD audio codec.


ASRock X570 Pro4 motherboard

The primary difference aside from the form factor is the ASRock X570 Pro4 naturally has more PCB space for extra PCIe connectivity. This includes two PCIe 4.0 x1 slots on the X570 Pro4 compared to the single PCIe 4.0 x1 on the X570M Pro4, but surprisingly, both feature two full-length PCIe 4.0 x4 slots and an M.2 Key E for users to add their own Wi-Fi/BT module. Both include a DisplayPort and HDMI video output on the rear panel, and four memory slots capable of supporting up to DDR4-4066 with a maximum capacity of up to 64 GB.


ASRock X570M Pro4 microATX motherboard at Computex 2019

The rear panel on both the ASRock X570 Pro4 and X570M Pro4 are identical in terms of connections and includes a single USB 3.1 G2 Type-A, a single USB 3.1 G2 Type-C, six USB 3.1 G1 Type-A ports, and a single Ethernet port powered by an Intel I211AT Gigabit controller. For audio, there are three color coded 3.5 mm audio jacks which is controlled by a Realtek ALC1200 HD audio codec.

It's clear that the X570 Pro4 and X570M Pro4 models are aimed at users with more a more professional focus; this is prevalent in the feature set and the aesthetic. There is nothing flashy about the Pro4, but it does represent a more modest offering in its X570 product stack with the X570 Pro4 priced at $170, with the X570M Pro4 coming in at a slightly higher MSRP of $186

ASRock X570 Extreme4 ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Formula
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  • TheUnhandledException - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Why on the last page would you label a section "3 or MORE M.2 Slots". I looked up all the boards in the section to find the one with four slots. All of the boards listed have exactly three m.2 slots. It isn't 3 or more m.2 slots. It is three m.2 slots. Reply
  • Sychonut - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    Great job Gavin!! This is impressive. Reply
  • umano - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    Can't wait for the new threadripper platform Reply
  • binkleym - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    Given that several motherboards are having to remove features (RAID, graphical BIOS, user profiles) from the BIOS in order to fit the AGESA for Zen 2, it would be nice if motherboard reviews would start mentioning the size of the BIOS, so we can easily discern which motherboards are designed to be future-proof, and which ones are nickel'd and dime'd into early obsolescence. Reply
  • ballsystemlord - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    Spelling and grammar corrections (I did not read the descriptions of all the MBs):

    "...with that link consuming 4 dedicated anes from each chip."
    Missing "l":
    "...with that link consuming 4 dedicated lanes from each chip."

    "Notably motherboard vendors have said that the upcoming 16-core Ryzen 9 3950X was the baseline for which the new VRM designs were validated against."
    Missing comma:
    "Notably, motherboard vendors have said that the upcoming 16-core Ryzen 9 3950X was the baseline for which the new VRM designs were validated against."
    Reply
  • ballsystemlord - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    @Gavin Could you guys start adding a column of boards that have 6 or more PCI(e) slots, it seems that they've been getting fewer and fewer since M.2 came out?
    Thanks!
    Reply
  • ballsystemlord - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    I mean total slots. Not any particular size. Reply
  • stux - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    In your “if you want thunderbolt 3” section, you really should mention the ASRock Creator. Otherwise the choices are water cooling specialist limited edition or ITX. Reply
  • peevee - Friday, July 12, 2019 - link

    Why "DDR4 support" and "memory channels" are listed in the chipset table? These are CPU features, not chipset features. Reply
  • BerserkZodd - Saturday, July 13, 2019 - link

    I ordered an X570 Steel Legend and a MP600 Gen4 PCIe M2 drive. My motherboard is still being shipped but it looks like the heatsink that goes over top of the M2 slots is one big piece, meaning my very expensive m2 drive wouldnt fit under that. Can anyone confirm if that is in fact one giant heat sink or does the M2 part come off separate. Reply

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