Samsung today has introduced the Galaxy Book2, its newest attempt to create an always on, always connected convertible PC. For the new 2-in-1 notebook, Samsung opted to use Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 850 supercharged mobile SoC and rates the battery life of the device to 20 hours. Like the rest of the Windows-on-Snapdragon systems, the Galaxy Book2 runs Windows 10 S. Meanwhile, unlike the original model, the Galaxy Book2 will be offered in only one configuration (at least initially).

The Samsung Galaxy Book2 detachable notebook comes with a 12-inch sAMOLED display featuring a 2160×1440 resolution and a 3:2 aspect ratio. The device is based on the Qualcomm Snapdragon 850 SoC (four Kryo 385 cores at 2.96 GHz, four Kryo 385 cores at 1.7 GHz, Adreno 630 GPU) which is accompanied by 4 GB of DRAM, and 128 GB of NAND flash storage. The system’s wireless connectivity includes Snapdragon X20 LTE modem (Cat 18, 5CA, 4x4 MIMO, up to 1.2 Gbps DL, up to 150 Mbps UL and 802.11ac Wi-Fi.

On the wired side of things, the Galaxy Book2 is outfitted with two USB Type-C connectors, a microSD card slot, and a 3.5-mm TRRS audio header. When it comes to imaging, the convertible PC uses an 8 MP rear camera, and a 5 MP front-facing sensor. As for audio, the system has a built-in microphone as well as Dolby Atmos-badged stereo speakers. Since the Galaxy Book2 is a convertible machine, it has the same set of sensors as tablets, including an accelerometer, a gyro, a light sensor, and a geomagnetic sensor. In addition, the system has a fingerprint reader for a biometric authentication.

The first-generation Galaxy Book used Intel’s dual-core 7th Gen Core m3 and Core i5 “Kaby Lake” processors along with a standalone LTE Cat 6 modem (up to 300 Mbps DL). The switch to Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 850  boosts both LTE performance and battery life of the laptop. Furthermore, without disclosing capacity of the battery it uses, Samsung rates Galaxy Book2 for up to 20 hours of autonomous work, up from 10 hours in case of the previous-gen convertible. It should be noted that the 256 GB SKU from the previous gen has not carried over.

Moving on to portability of the Galaxy Book2. Samsung claims that the system is 7.62 mm thick (0.3 inch) and weighs 840 grams (1.85 lbs), but does not elaborate whether it mentions the tablet itself, or the tablet with the keyboard.

Specifications of the Galaxy Book2
  Model 12-e011nr
Display 12-inch,
2160×1440
216 PPI
CPU Qualcomm Snapdragon 850
4 x Kryo 385 at 2.96 GHz
4 x Kryo 385 at 1.7 GHz
Graphics Adreno 630 GB
RAM 4 GB
Storage 128 GB
Wi-Fi 802.11ac Wi-Fi
Bluetooth ?
WWAN Qualcomm X20 Gigabit LTE
Cat 18, 5CA, 4x4 MIMO, up to 1.2 Gbps DL, up to 150 Mbps UL
USB 3.0 2 × Type-C
Cameras Front 5 MP
Rear 8 MP
Other I/O Microphone, stereo speakers, audio jack, trackpad, MicroSD card reader, etc.
Battery ? Wh
Battery Life 20 hours
Dimensions Width 287.5 mm | 11.32"
Height 200.4 mm | 7.89"
Thickness 7.62 mm | 0.3” (?)
Weight Tablet 839 grams | 1.85 lbs (?)
Tablet+KB 839 grams | 1.85 lbs (?)
Price $1000 with keyboard and stylus

Samsung’s Galaxy Book2 will be available online from Samsung, Microsoft, and AT&T, for $1000 starting November 2. Later in November the product will be available in retail from AT&T, Spring, and Verizon. While the price of the convertible laptop does not seem particularly cheap, it should be noted that the Galaxy Book2 bundles both the keyboard and stylus, rather than being sold separately (for up to $250 on competing products).

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  • Jeremy G - Thursday, October 18, 2018 - link

    By your logic, Microsoft doesn't trust Intels desktop CPU's either.. since they run their Surface Studio on laptop CPUs.

    OR, maybe, the SD 850 wasn't finalized when Microsoft began work on the Surface GO .. just like how they use 7th gen cpus on their Studio since the 8th wasn't ready to go when they started development.
    Reply
  • npz - Friday, October 19, 2018 - link

    Well the point of being productive on Windows is to run x86 applications. And the emulation itself is highly restrictive (no 64-bit, no OpenGL, no special device access or drivers) Reply
  • Wilco1 - Friday, October 19, 2018 - link

    It's a 2-in-1, not an engineering laptop, so being productive means email, browsing, spreadsheets, powerpoint etc - and all these run native 64-bit Arm code. Reply
  • mpbello - Friday, October 19, 2018 - link

    For email and browsing on the move you have your smartphone already! Reply
  • Manch - Friday, October 19, 2018 - link

    For literally 29$ more you can get a Pro 6 with an i5/8GB/128GB w/ keyboard. No emulation at all. Can go cheaper and get the late model Core M model and save a couple hundred. This thing has priced itself out of the market. Reply
  • Wilco1 - Friday, October 19, 2018 - link

    It's $1,128: https://www.laptopmag.com/reviews/laptops/microsof...

    "The Surface Pro 6 starts at $899 for a Core i5 processor, 8GB of RAM and 128GB of storage, but that's misleading. The vast majority of people will want to add the keyboard, which brings the price up to $1,028, and if you get the Surface Pen the total goes to $1,128."
    Reply
  • Manch - Saturday, October 20, 2018 - link

    Except for the pen part and the whining about it being misleading which it isnt, you just repeated what I wrote. The Surface has NEVER come with the KB. They're on their 6th iteration, so people have long learned this. Anyone that goes to buy one and miraculously hasn't seen this to be the case, using their powers of comprehension will realize the KB is sold separately.

    So at the with pen price, you get a faster x86/x64 proc, 4GB extra RAM for 99$ more.

    Again the Samsung tablet has priced itself out of the market. There is no justification fro using a gimped Windows 10S when you can get full featured x64 Win10 at the same price range.
    Reply
  • Wilco1 - Sunday, October 21, 2018 - link

    I agree with the article that it is misleading since practically everybody wants the keyboard, and various posters on here claimed that Surface is cheaper when it clearly isn't.

    But the fact the Surface has half the battery life and no LTE is a deal breaker.
    Reply
  • phoenix_rizzen - Thursday, October 18, 2018 - link

    Ouch, only 4 GB of RAM? That's not going to be fun to use, unless treating it like a single-tasking device. :(

    For that price, there should be at least 8 GB of RAM. This isn't an Android device, after all.
    Reply
  • r3loaded - Thursday, October 18, 2018 - link

    Even iPhones have 4GB now. Reply

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