Today Apple will release iOS 9, and Apple Watch users were also supposed to receive an update to watchOS 2 which comes with a number of significant improvements to Apple's wearable OS. Unfortunately, it appears that those users will have to wait a bit longer, as the watchOS 2 update has been delayed due to an unspecified bug. TechCrunch shared the below statement from Apple confirming that the update will be delayed.

“We have discovered a bug in development of watchOS 2 that is taking a bit longer to fix than we expected. We will not release watchOS 2 today but will shortly.”

Apple has had issues with updates in recent times, such as the iOS 8.0.1 update that affected Touch ID and calling functionality on the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. Because the Apple Watch is managed from your iPhone and has no way to be connected to iTunes by a user for a restore it's extremely important that Apple ensures the stability of updates before shipping them. It's not clear exactly what "shortly" means, but it's likely that Apple will not want to delay their planned launch for any longer than necessary.

Source: TechCrunch

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  • Stanthewizzard - Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - link

    I hope that the upgrade from GM is going to be "easy" Reply
  • Prod1702 - Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - link

    Hmm I am using OS2 GM on my watch now and don't seem to have any bugs that make the watch not usable. I wonder what this bug is. Reply
  • A5 - Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - link

    Vague press release would indicate a security issue of some kind, IMO. Reply
  • freeskier93 - Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - link

    Bingo. Unspecified bug that's actually delaying launch means security issue. If it was a feature issue they'd still launch with the feature disabled like they did with the HealthKit. Reply
  • Samus - Thursday, September 17, 2015 - link

    Odds are they broke something, probably Apple Pay related since iOS9 had an overhaul of Passbook (not Wallet) and they can't afford to screw up payment transactions or have them insecure, especially when the whole point of paying with the Apple Watch is to increase security/decrease fraud. Reply
  • Acid Rain - Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - link

    I would absolutely hate to be a developer in the team responsible for this right now. Reply
  • Ken_g6 - Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - link

    Trademark infringement suit from IBM over "OS 2"? :P Reply
  • russki - Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - link

    haha, that's hilariuos! OS/2 is so old... Reply
  • Samus - Thursday, September 17, 2015 - link

    I would be shocked, but enlightened, if IBM still held the trademark to OS/2. I think the last commercial customer they had for Merlin (Warp with Win32 support) was Brussels International Airport in Belgium through 2003. How long are trademark filings good for? Reply
  • usernametaken76 - Thursday, September 17, 2015 - link

    Abandonment:

    If you stop using your trademark for a time, your ownership rights will diminish over time and eventually disappear, leaving the mark abandoned and available for anyone else to take up. How long it takes before you can no longer claim ownership of a trademark depends on whether you registered the mark, and how well known the mark became while you used it. Without registration, the evaporation of your ownership rights can occur very quickly. When an enterprise goes out of business without having registered the trademark, there is no title to the property to be sold off, passed to departing stakeholders, or taken by creditors. In the case of a registered mark, the title to the mark remains in force for as long as the registration is maintained, and in the U.S. a registration can be maintained in force even when it is not being used with a declaration of the trademark owner's intention to take up use again in the future. And where a mark has become "famous," a claim of ownership can be sustained even years after the mark goes out of use, simply because consumers remember the association between the mark and the product it represented.

    Acquiescence:

    Finally, your ownership rights in a trademark can melt away simply by your inaction, by your standing by and allowing othesr to use your mark for themselves. As with any other property, you must assert your ownership of it or lose it.
    Reply

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