Synthetics

Our synthetic benchmarks can sometimes tell us a lot about what an architecture is capable of. In this case, we do have some unanswered questions about why Intel falls short of the GT 650M in some cases but not in others. We'll turn to 3DMark Vantage first to stress ROP and texel rates.

Synthetic: 3DMark Vantage Pixel Fill

Iris Pro doesn't appear to have a ROP problem, at least not in 3DMark Vantage. NVIDIA can output more pixels than Iris Pro though, so it's entirely possible that we're just not seeing any problems because we're looking at a synthetic test. Comparing the HD 4600 to the Iris Pro 5200 we see near perfect scaling in pixel throughput. Remember the ROP hardware is located in slice common, which is doubled when going from GT2 to GT3. Here we see a near doubling of pixel fillrate as a result.

Moving on, we have our 3DMark Vantage texture fillrate test, which does for texels and texture mapping units what the previous test does for ROPs.

Synthetic: 3DMark Vantage Texel Fill

Now this is quite interesting. NVIDIA has a 50% advantage in texturing performance, that's actually higher than what the raw numbers would indicate. It's entirely possible that this is part of what we're seeing manifest itself in some of the game benchmarks.

Finally we’ll take a quick look at tessellation performance with TessMark.

Synthetic: TessMark, Image Set 4, 64x Tessellation

Iris Pro doesn't appear to have a geometry problem. Tessellation performance is very good.

Image Quality 3DMarks & GFXBenchmark
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  • tipoo - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    It still seems to me that this misses where it would benefit most: 13 inch laptops, which currently mostly use dual core processors. GT3e would make something like the Retina MBP 13" much more appealing for instance, but it's paired with processors such that the wattage would be too high. Reply
  • tipoo - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    Oh and I wanted to ask, if the integrated graphics are disabled can the CPU still tap into the eDRAM? Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    Yes, it's a dedicated cache for both the CPU and the GPU. However it's very unlikely you're going to run into any scenario that uses a Crystalwell-equipped part in such a manner. It's not being sold in socket form, so it will go to OEMs, who in turn would only use it if they didn't include a dGPU. Reply
  • jeffkibuule - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    So pretty much, unless you've got some huge beefy GPU that would absolutely suck up power compared to just using Iris Pro graphics, no one would opt for that SKU? Reply
  • shiznit - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    Right on. A dual core model for the 13" rMPB would have me selling my 2012 immediately. Now I need to decide if I can live with the 15" or even bother. Reply
  • moep - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    If i interpreted the results of this article correctly, I suspect that the 15" MBP is probably going to get a new and even thinner form factor with this refresh. (one chip less, fewer VRM related parts, lower combined TDP)

    A 15" rMBP approaching the weight of a 15" Macbook Air would be very interesting, although a part of me hoped that Apple would wait until Broadwell to ditch the dGPU in the 15".

    Such a step back in GPU performance with the Retina display is surely not going to be very pleasant in 3D applications.
    Reply
  • Galatian - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    I actually hope/suspect, that Apple will go the other road: use a discrete graphic solution on the 15" rMBP until Broadwell comes out, but have a cTDPdown version of the 4850HQ on the 13" rMBP. Maybe they can even get the normal TDP version in there; after all it has the same (good) cooling the 15" rMBP has and I have never heard the fans on mine. I think Apple really designed it with Haswell in mind, so let's see what they'll bring on during the next few weeks. Reply
  • tipoo - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    That's certainly the best case, I really hope they go down that road. The rMBP as a quad with Iris Pro would really make it worth the Pro name. Reply
  • vFunct - Sunday, June 2, 2013 - link

    They'll probably stick with the built in GPU for the 13" model and a discrete GPU for the 15" model, which is what they do right now.

    Apple's top-end MacBook Pro has always had the highest end discrete GPU available.
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Tuesday, June 4, 2013 - link

    I'm guessing you mean "for a given power usage", as there are definitely faster GPUs out there than the 650M. Reply

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