Toshiba has introduced a new line of energy-efficient hard drives for surveillance applications. The new DT02-V series HDDs will support up to 32 HD streams and offer capacities of up to 6 TB. The company says that the key advantage that the new drives will provide over its direct predecessors is improved reliability.

Toshiba’s DT02-V family of 3.5-inch hard drives will include models with 2 TB, 4 TB, and 6 TB capacities featuring a 5400 RPM spindle speed, a 128 MB cache buffer, and a SATA 6 Gbps interface. Being aimed at digital video recorder (DVR) and network video recorder (NVR) platforms applications, the DT02-V HDDs support a variety of enhancements, such as ability to record data from up to 32 cameras simultaneously as well as being rated to run 24/7 – including in multi-drive environments.

Performance-wise, Toshiba expects its DT02-V HDDs to offer up to 185 MB/s sustained sequential data transfer speeds. As for reliability, they are rated for up to 180 TB per year workload, 600,000 load/unload cycles, and one million hours MTBF, which is significantly below ratings of enterprise-grade hard drives, but is in line with other HDDs for surveillance applications.

According to Toshiba, its new DT02-V hard drives offer higher reliability compared to the prior-generation low-spin MD04ABA-V HDDs. Overall, the drives offer higher performance at a lower level of power consumption.

Specifications of Toshiba's DT02-V HDDs
AnandTech.com 6 TB 4 TB 2 TB
P/N DT02ABA600V DT02ABA400V DT02ABA200V
RPM 5400 RPM
Interface SATA 6 Gbps
DRAM Cache 128 MB
Persistent Write Cache none
ATA Streaming Supported
Read-Modify-Write ?
Sequential Data Transfer Rate (host to/from drive) ? 185 MB/s ?
MTBF 1 million
Rated Annual Workload 180 TB
Acoustics (typical, low power) 22 dBA
Power Consumption Operating ? 4.11 W ?
Active Idle ? 2.36 W ?
Standby ? 0.20 W ?
Warranty ? Years

Toshiba considers hard drives for surveillance applications as a very important market for the company as demand for such HDDs is expected to grow in the coming years, particularly in China. As a company that wants to expand sales of its storage devices, Toshiba believes it is crucial for it to address growing markets.

The company is sampling the 4 TB model of the new HDDs today, while samples of 6 TB drives are due in January, and samples of 2 TB SKUs are expected in March. It is unclear when the manufacturer plans to start volume sales of the new hard drives, but it is safe to say that this should happen in 2020.

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Source: Toshiba

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  • azfacea - Thursday, December 5, 2019 - link

    "demand for such HDDs is expected to grow in the coming years, particularly in China"

    no its not. unit shipments will go down not up. dubious claims about "network recorder market" will not be reversing a decade long trend.
    Reply
  • azfacea - Thursday, December 5, 2019 - link

    just because you put "china" and "growth" in one sentence, doesnt mean its automatically true. on what grounds are about to see a major shift in the market?

    SSDs have double in GB per dollar in the last 18 months alone. to think that will have no impact, that no pct of the market will care? and there will be no market share loss, because SSDs "ARE WAY TOO EXPENSIVE" as my replies will be pointing out.

    HDD unit shipments in 2020 will be 70% of 2019. and in 2021 it will be 70% of 2020. its called exponential decay to zero.

    its been doing that b4 3D nand showed up. its been doing that for a decade. and no amount wishful thinking will over ride that.
    Reply
  • Korguz - Thursday, December 5, 2019 - link

    " HDD unit shipments in 2020 will be 70% of 2019. and in 2021 it will be 70% of 2020. its called exponential decay to zero. " source for this ??

    " when was the last time you used an optical disc "?? last night actually.. i STILL put optical drives in my comps, and will continue to do so, as i still use them. the DRM, is crap.. some can be disabled just by disabling the autoplay feature...

    " hard drives are not as sticky as optical drives and will die even faster. " thats hard to say.. it really depends on how the ssd market grows, and expands as far as size and prices, drives above 1 tb here.. are still a tad on the expensive side compared to mechanical hdds ...
    Reply
  • azfacea - Thursday, December 5, 2019 - link

    "source for this ??" if you had read the next sentence, I already answered you. on top of that there is data from a company that makes hard drive motors.

    https://www.anandtech.com/show/14298/shipments-of-...
    Reply
  • Korguz - Thursday, December 5, 2019 - link

    didnt even see that post back in may.... interesting... but still.. ssds is no match for the space mechanical storage is able to provide for the price.. a 4 tb ssd, starts at $720 here, 4 tb mechanical, starts at $150 as i said.. still a tad on the expensive side.... Reply
  • DanNeely - Friday, December 6, 2019 - link

    You need to look beyond the headline. The implosion is in PC hard drives. Surveillance applications would either be data center - which is growing - or consumer electronics - which is slowly shrinking. In the latter case the shrinking is probably due to the decline in home TV DVRs (and which will probably accelerate in the nearish future because the PS5 and XBoxNext are both expected to use SSDs not HDDs for storage). SMB video surveillance could easily be a growing segment within the CE bucket even as the entire market as a whole continues to shrink. Reply
  • Samus - Friday, December 6, 2019 - link

    storing video is the worst possible application for ssd's, unless you are live editing it. and even then linear video editing is totally acceptable on an ssd. people used to do that on TAPE AND FILM you know... Reply
  • Duncan Macdonald - Thursday, December 5, 2019 - link

    The rated annual workload equates to a sustained data transfer rate of under 6MB/sec.This seems low for the stated application even with extensive upstream data compression. Reply
  • azfacea - Thursday, December 5, 2019 - link

    ppl said optical drives are not going away. because the offline cold storage of disks was too precious and too valuable. what was the last time you used an optical disk ??

    and optical disks/drives had a huge advantage that HDD dont have. i call it "established investments". ppl who had bought large number of movies on DVD and blu ray would need to buy players or lose their library. ppl who kept buying players were a large market for future movies. same with games and consoles. it also had a DRM advantage for record companies who wanted to control hardware and not just software and yet it died and no one missed it.

    hard drives are not as sticky as optical drives and will die even faster.
    Reply
  • ballsystemlord - Thursday, December 5, 2019 - link

    I'm using my optical drive today.
    I like it. It's very good for booting Linux, backing up data to permanent storage, etc.
    Just because the manufactures wanted to save space and a few bucks doesn't make the technology bad or dead.
    Reply

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