Intel has notified its partners about plans to discontinue its only 10nm small form factor NUC in the market. The NUC, which went under the code name of Crimson Canyon, is/was Intel's only 10nm device in this market - it used Cannon Lake processors made on its 10 nm technology, and paired with AMD’s Radeon 540 graphics. 

The fate of Intel’s Cannon Lake processors has been, to put it mildly, 'dead on arrival'. Delayed by over a year because of problems with 10 nm fabrication process, the CPUs suffered low yields and had design selections made that resulted in a non-functioning integrated GPU, as well as high power consumption: the Core i3-8121U processor at the heart of Intel's first generation 10nm ended up in a few China-only laptops (which we reviewed), and in a small number of Crimson Canyon NUC devices.

Intel advises parties interested in its Crimson Canyon NUC SFF PCs to make their final orders by December 27, 2019, or return them by that date. The final NUCs powered by the Cannon Lake processors will be shipped by February 28, 2020.

The axing of this NUC also coincides with several other 14nm NUCs being given the same treatment:

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  • NUC8I3CYSN
  • NUC5CPYH
  • NUC5i3RYHS
  • NUC5i3RYHSN
  • NUC5i5RYHS
  • NUC5PPYH

While the EOL of the Crimson Canyon Mini PCs is not exactly surprising, it will be interesting to see what Intel plans to offer on 10nm in the NUC space in future. Technically speaking the Core i3-8121U has not been formally discontinued, which is a real head scratcher.

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Source: Intel (Thanks to our reader SH SOTN for the tip)

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  • vladx - Wednesday, November 06, 2019 - link

    Hopefully Ice Lake and Comet Lake NUCs are coming in 2020. Reply
  • npz - Wednesday, November 06, 2019 - link

    Well that was quick.

    > had design selections made that resulted in a non-functioning integrated GPU

    In addition to non-switchable gpu like you would have on a laptop, the real deal killer was limited the memory to fixed/soldered 4GB and 8GB amounts. This made absolutely no sense.
    Reply
  • psychobriggsy - Wednesday, November 06, 2019 - link

    Given that Cannonlake shipments have been rumoured to be below six figures, shared between a laptop design and this NUC as far as I am aware, maybe rarity value will kick in down the line if you are fortunate (or not) enough to own one. Reply
  • Jorgp2 - Wednesday, November 06, 2019 - link

    TIL 5th gen nucs are still sold Reply
  • GreenReaper - Wednesday, November 06, 2019 - link

    They're not NUCs any more, they're PUCs. Reply
  • austinsguitar - Wednesday, November 06, 2019 - link

    thats a damn shame... 10nm intel is only good for its new gpu, and that gpu would be perfect for a little nuc. litterally all nucs are good for is watching some high quality videos and doing light apps for the tv and this would have been the ultimate. damn. Reply
  • MrSpadge - Wednesday, November 06, 2019 - link

    Cannon Lake had the old GPU design, as far as I know. So any benefit would purely come from the process, not the architecture. Reply
  • dromoxen - Thursday, November 07, 2019 - link

    Rubbish NUCS are good for everything a normal dekstop PC except of course adding BULK by way of an additional gfx card. Shame that NV has also killed off the mxm card formfactor , not that it was ever really punted to home consumer. Will keep a lookout for these at sale prices.
    Soldered ram is a real deal breaker for most, the 4gb version will be pretty worthless.
    N>B. I thought this had been announced (on slides) a few weeks ago ...
    Reply
  • Krysto - Wednesday, November 06, 2019 - link

    The 10nm process will be ready any day now.

    The 10nm process is super reliable.

    I pity the fools who buy Intel's BS and buy the duds that will be ALL of its 10nm chips. On second thought, if they do buy Intel's BS anyway, maybe they deserve to be abused like the 10nm NUC guys just were.
    Reply
  • MrSpadge - Wednesday, November 06, 2019 - link

    Why? They got the hardware that was promised, didn't they? And the systems will work just fine even if no new ones are sold. It's just that the 10 nm process doesn't really help the chips. Reply

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