Silicon Power has introduced its new external SSD series that promises to bring together reliability, performance, and compatibility with the latest PCs featuring a USB Type-C interface. The Silicon Power Bolt B75 Pro comes in an aluminum scratchproof and shockproof chassis that is 12.2 mm thick and has special ridges to guard against fingerprints.

The Silicon Power Bolt B75 Pro lineup of external SSDs comprises of four models featuring 256 GB, 512 GB, 1 TB, and 2 TB configurations. The drives are rated for up to 520 MB/s sequential write speed as well as for up to 420 MB/s sequential write speed. Such levels of performance show that the Bolt B75 Pro drives use an entry-level SATA SSD behind a USB 3.1 Gen 2 controller. As always with these sorts of announcements, the company does not immediately disclose what kind of NAND flash memory and SSD controller the drives use.

The Bolt B75 Pro SSDs feature a USB Type-C interface and do not require any external power adapters. To maintain compatibility both with new and legacy PCs, Silicon Power bundles the drives with a USB-C to USB-C as well as USB-C to USB-A cables.

It is noteworthy that outlook of the Bolt B75 Pro was inspired by design of the Junkers F.13, a German transport plane. Just like the aircraft, the Bolt B75 Pro has ridges, yet in case of the storage device they are placed to protect against fingerprints. As noted above, the SSD is also said to be protected against shocks and is covered with a special paint that is claimed to be scratchproof.

Silicon Power’s Bolt B75 Pro SSDs will be available in the near future, but their MSRPs are unknown at this time. All the drives are covered by a three-year warranty.

Silicon Power Bolt B80 Specifications
  256 GB 512 GB 1 TB 2 TB
Speed Read Up to 520 MB/s
Write Up to 420 MB/s
Interface USB 3.1 Gen 2,
Compatible with USB 3.0, USB 2.0
Cable USB-C-to-USB-A
Dimensions 124.4 × 82 × 12.2 mm
4.89 × 3.22 × 0.48 inches
Model Number SP256GBPSD75PSCK SP512GBPSD75PSCK SP010TBPSD75PSCK SP020TBPSD75PSCK

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Source: Silicon Power

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  • Skeptical123 - Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - link

    With all those press images this article look like an ad. I would assume it was one but I don't see a sponsorship disclaimer anywhere. Reply
  • Valantar - Thursday, May 23, 2019 - link

    That's a weird place to draw the line. Including the manufacturer's provided images when reporting on a press release is perfectly normal - how the device looks is rather crucial, after all, and with a just-released product it's unlikely there are other pictures available. Besides, wouldn't an ad try to sell this thing? There's no price, and IMO, passages like "Such levels of performance show that the Bolt B75 Pro drives use an entry-level SATA SSD behind a USB 3.1 Gen 2 controller. As always with these sorts of announcements, the company does not immediately disclose what kind of NAND flash memory and SSD controller the drives use." put this firmly in "not an ad" territory. Reply
  • Skeptical123 - Thursday, May 23, 2019 - link

    Sorry if my wording was not clear, I have no issue with press images in general. My only gripe with the article is the shear amount of the ad style press photos. Sure on or two are normal and often unavoidable but the article has more a lot more than that. There are too many photos in this article in the first place that don't add information imo and some even say things like "your new drive elegant".

    Regardless in regard too "Besides, wouldn't an ad try to sell this thing? There's no price". Ads are often just about publicity and try to get you to buy things latter they don't have to sell you things directly including things like a price and link. For example movies and games are often advertised well in advance of set release dates and even age ratings.

    Also I've heard good things about the people that run anandtech I don't think their trying to pull a fast one here but as my point of view I would say its objective to much photo wise.
    Reply
  • rahvin - Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - link

    Shockproof is irrelevant. No SSD is susceptible to the same shocks as spinning Rust. Reply
  • Skeptical123 - Thursday, May 23, 2019 - link

    Your right shock proofing is less not as crucial with SSDs than hard drives but there are still things that could break in the device. Stress fractures could form in pcbs and break traces, smd parts solder could shear for example. And the reality is not everyone understands the difference between hard drives and SSDs drives. Or people could just be looking at some specs on the sheet or box so it's worth stating still. Reply
  • Dragonstongue - Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - link

    why such low available speed especially via USB 3.1 / TB
    as well from size can easy get m.2 connectors in there so can "saturate" high speed wise, externally
    for those (like me) that want their storage to get proper cooled and not cramped into a hot
    area of motherboard ^.^
    Reply
  • Billy Tallis - Thursday, May 23, 2019 - link

    USB 3.1 and Thunderbolt aren't the same thing, and using a USB-C connector doesn't automatically win you any faster data rate. This is a relatively low-end portable SSD. USB to SATA bridges (even ones with 10Gbps USB support) are cheaper than USB to NVMe bridges or Thunderbolt controllers. And SATA SSDs are still a bit cheaper than low-end NVMe. Reply
  • lmcd - Friday, May 24, 2019 - link

    USB to NVMe bridges are almost impossible aren't they? NVMe explicitly is over PCIe as best as I understand it, and PCIe isn't supported in USB until USB 4 AFAIK. Reply
  • Mitch89 - Thursday, May 23, 2019 - link

    What about this is news?

    This looks like a cheap eBay case with an unknown 2.5-inch SSD inside. You could build one yourself with an $10 case and whatever SSD you'd like.
    Reply
  • motopen1s - Thursday, May 23, 2019 - link

    You are so right about this...) Reply

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