Gaming: F1 2018

Aside from keeping up-to-date on the Formula One world, F1 2017 added HDR support, which F1 2018 has maintained; otherwise, we should see any newer versions of Codemasters' EGO engine find its way into F1. Graphically demanding in its own right, F1 2018 keeps a useful racing-type graphics workload in our benchmarks.

We use the in-game benchmark, set to run on the Montreal track in the wet, driving as Lewis Hamilton from last place on the grid. Data is taken over a one-lap race.

AnandTech CPU Gaming 2019 Game List
Game Genre Release Date API IGP Low Med High
F1 2018 Racing Aug
2018
DX11 720p
Low
1080p
Med
4K
High
4K
Ultra

All of our benchmark results can also be found in our benchmark engine, Bench.

F1 2018 IGP Low Medium High
Average FPS
95th Percentile

Even through the 4K, the G5400 is the processor to have for F1 2018 between the two.

Gaming: Shadow of the Tomb Raider (DX12) Power Consumption: TDP Doesn't Matter
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  • brakdoo - Monday, January 14, 2019 - link

    The reason why I bought the 200GE last month: The 5400 is 75€+ and was above 80 when I bought my parts in my country. The Intel shortage makes it easy to decide but I that it'll be over soon.

    BTW: Does graphics performance have an influence on WebGL stuff like google maps or isn't that challenging enough?
    Reply
  • blu42 - Monday, January 14, 2019 - link

    Shouldn't 'measured under heavy load' suggest a heavy load for the entire package, not the CPU cores alone? Reply
  • Robotire - Monday, January 14, 2019 - link

    This. I’m surprised a pure CPU (I think?) load was used. I would be interesting to know power usage while gaming.

    Also I’m more likely to buy a component that uses less power… but I guess some SUV owners might prefer it the other way.

    Otherwise it’s a very interesting article, thanks! I don’t care at all about overpriced products, but reviews like this one are useful.
    Reply
  • SaturnusDK - Monday, January 14, 2019 - link

    It's important to note that even if you could get a G5400 at the $64 MSRP, it would be 16% more expensive than the $55 Athlon. However, you can't get the G5400 for $64. The lowest price I have ever seen it retail at is $80 which makes the choice for a absolutely bottom bin bargain buyer easy.
    If you're still even contemplating the G5400 at it's actual $80 price tag then it would be wise to consider if you can go the extra $20 and get the vastly superior 2200G instead.
    Reply
  • Drumsticks - Monday, January 14, 2019 - link

    As of right now, the Pentium G5400 is $129.99 on Newegg (??????) and $101 on Amazon from an alternate seller. OTOH, the Athlon 200GE is readily available from both for $60. That's a pretty stark difference. Reply
  • ikjadoon - Monday, January 14, 2019 - link

    The pricing is out of whack at Newegg: G5400 for $129, G5500 (3.8GHz w/ UHD630) for $114, and G5600 (3.9GHz w/ UDH630) for $113.

    You save $16...while buying a higher-end part.

    B&H Photo has it for slightly-less absurd 24% markup over MSRP ($80): https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1393125-REG...
    Reply
  • khanikun - Tuesday, January 15, 2019 - link

    Ya, the G5400 makes no sense with it's pricing. An i3 8100 is a quad core 3.6 ghz proc with UHD630 for $119. Unless power usage is a main concern, I wouldn't bother with any of those G procs currently. Until prices drops, doesn't make much sense to buy them. Reply
  • Zim - Saturday, January 19, 2019 - link

    $65 at Fry's https://www.frys.com/product/9499961 Reply
  • StevoLincolnite - Tuesday, January 15, 2019 - link

    Even in Australia... The G5400 is $129. - Doesn't make sense to grab that when you can get the Ryzen 3 2200G for $155... You could probably find a motherboard that reduces that $26 pricing gap.

    Otherwise the 200GE is $79... $50 cheaper.

    The G4920 is more inline with the 200GE's price at $89 currently... And at that point, the 200GE is still the decided victor.
    Reply
  • PVG - Monday, January 14, 2019 - link

    I think TDP has to cover simultaneous heavy usage of both the CPU and IGP. POV-Ray only really stresses the CPU side.
    I see how one can disregard the IGP contribution on higher end chips, but on models like this, where there's a big chance the IGP will actually be put to use, I fell it should be taken into account, on the power measuring front.
    Reply

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