Before Computex we reported on Streacom’s latest creation, the DA2. This is an all-aluminium chassis aimed at small form factor systems but with a key twist – the rails on the inside allowed the system builder to orient all of the parts in the chassis in any direction and any location. Streacom’s rail design has been shown at Computex for a few years, and they say that the latest iteration is the easiest yet. The full ‘ring’ around the chassis is designed to be like a unibody component with a front panel bezel that is removable. The front panel switch has a custom LED light inside for system integrators to personalize, along with a USB Type-C connector (using a traditional 19-pin header).

What Streacom was showing at Computex as a prototype was the fanless version of the DA2. Instead of having the meshed aluminium of the active cooling variant on the sides, the fanless version used side panels with fins to help dissipate heat, and will come with an integrated heatsink to use on the processor inside (they’re still working on how to do this). It is all still a prototype, particularly the fin placement and size, so the final product might have various differentiation options depending on the customer (such as a logo embedded into the fins).

Streacom is aiming to place the fanless version of the DA2 into the market in Q4. Pricing is TBD.

Want to keep up to date with all of our Computex 2018 Coverage?
 
Laptops
 
Hardware
 
Chips
 
Follow AnandTech's breaking news here!
POST A COMMENT

7 Comments

View All Comments

  • osteopathic1 - Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - link

    PowerMac G5 circa 2005 Reply
  • guidryp - Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - link

    The Fanless version of the DA2 is known as the DB2:
    http://www.streacom.com/wp-content/uploads/db2-pro...

    Just like the Fanless DB4 has a version with fans called the DA4.
    Reply
  • Death666Angel - Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - link

    So this'll handle how much power consumption? 50W? 100W? 200W? If they ever release it, I'd definitely take a look. Good radiator cases aren't that common, especially if the component selection is not restricted. apart from power consumption. Reply
  • Spunjji - Thursday, June 14, 2018 - link

    Wild-ish guess based on the size compared with their other chassis - 45W. They tend to rate pretty conservatively. For the use case that's ideal - something like a Ryzen 5 2400 GE would pack a fair punch for a silent system, whether as a workhorse PC or media system. Reply
  • grant3 - Friday, June 15, 2018 - link

    No. Streacom doesn't rate conservatively and I don't think any of their cases are rated as low as 45w, not even ones which are smaller & clearly lower capacity than this one. Reply
  • grant3 - Friday, June 15, 2018 - link

    Streacom will probably claim 180w. (90w per side).

    In reality I would expect it to handle 120w (60w per side)

    I have an fc8 (smaller & cooling fins on 1 side) and it's rated for 90w but I can only sustain 70w from the wall before my system throttles.

    My power brick is external so if we guess it's 80% efficient, the entire FC8 case is dissipating about 55w.

    So you'll basically have enough capacity for a mid-range CPU & a mid-range GPU
    Reply
  • gradoman - Friday, June 15, 2018 - link

    I want to see how this would stack up against the other SFF cases that have been produced by small groups. Looks like it might be more flexible than something like an M1, but a bit bigger, perhaps easier, to build in. Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now