CPU Tests: Synthetic

Most of the people in our industry have a love/hate relationship when it comes to synthetic tests. On the one hand, they’re often good for quick summaries of performance and are easy to use, but most of the time the tests aren’t related to any real software. Synthetic tests are often very good at burrowing down to a specific set of instructions and maximizing the performance out of those. Due to requests from a number of our readers, we have the following synthetic tests.

Linux OpenSSL Speed: SHA256

One of our readers reached out in early 2020 and stated that he was interested in looking at OpenSSL hashing rates in Linux. Luckily OpenSSL in Linux has a function called ‘speed’ that allows the user to determine how fast the system is for any given hashing algorithm, as well as signing and verifying messages.

OpenSSL offers a lot of algorithms to choose from, and based on a quick Twitter poll, we narrowed it down to the following:

  1. rsa2048 sign and rsa2048 verify
  2. sha256 at 8K block size
  3. md5 at 8K block size

For each of these tests, we run them in single thread and multithreaded mode. All the graphs are in our benchmark database, Bench, and we use the sha256 and md5 results in published reviews.

(8-3c) Linux OpenSSL Speed sha256 8K Block (1T)(8-4c) Linux OpenSSL Speed sha256 8K Block (nT)

(8-3d) Linux OpenSSL Speed md5 8K Block (1T)(8-4d) Linux OpenSSL Speed md5 8K Block (nT)

GeekBench 5: Link

As a common tool for cross-platform testing between mobile, PC, and Mac, GeekBench is an ultimate exercise in synthetic testing across a range of algorithms looking for peak throughput. Tests include encryption, compression, fast Fourier transform, memory operations, n-body physics, matrix operations, histogram manipulation, and HTML parsing.

I’m including this test due to popular demand, although the results do come across as overly synthetic, and a lot of users often put a lot of weight behind the test due to the fact that it is compiled across different platforms (although with different compilers).

We have both GB5 and GB4 results in our benchmark database. GB5 was introduced to our test suite after already having tested ~25 CPUs, and so the results are a little sporadic by comparison. These spots will be filled in when we retest any of the CPUs.

(8-1c) Geekbench 5 Single Thread(8-1d) Geekbench 5 Multi-Thread

CPU Tests: Legacy and Web Gaming Tests: Chernobylite
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  • just4U - Thursday, November 5, 2020 - link

    There were some issues early on as the review came out (obviously got hammered..) good now tho.. Reply
  • MDD1963 - Saturday, November 7, 2020 - link

    The pages were indeed VERY slow to load the hour or two after they were posted....; overloaded, perhaps. Reply
  • NA1NSXR - Thursday, November 5, 2020 - link

    What are you talking about, have you seen the prices? We got a big leap but we also got a value-destroying price hike. 5800X is in line with 10900K throughout the suite, but is newer and no cheaper! Reply
  • catavalon21 - Thursday, November 5, 2020 - link

    Agree. The 10850 hands the 5800x it's backside in a great many contests, at about the same price point, yeah. Reply
  • just4U - Thursday, November 5, 2020 - link

    It's just launch prices (..shrug) I'd pay the premium for the 5900x and the 5950x but the 3800? Hmm no.. I'd either opt in for the 3900x or a Intel 10core part first at that price. Needs to be priced $10 cheaper than the 10900 (non K) which brings it closer to the 8core 10700K price. Reply
  • just4U - Thursday, November 5, 2020 - link

    err (should read 5800x) not 3800. Reply
  • yankeeDDL - Friday, November 6, 2020 - link

    The 10850 peaks at 140W *more* than the 5800x. It's, literally, half as efficient as the 5800x. Running the 10850 will on a daily basis will cost you easily much more than the CPU's cost itself over its lifetime. Reply
  • LithiumFirefly - Friday, November 6, 2020 - link

    Especially if you live in a climate that's warm part of the year paying more for AC cuz that Intel chip is hot AF Reply
  • dagobah123 - Friday, November 6, 2020 - link

    This is so much more important than people realize. I think they should include a cost of ownership when discussing these prices like they do with cars. Reply
  • lmcd - Monday, November 9, 2020 - link

    it wasn't important when AMD was behind so why is it important now? Reply

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