Intel has announced End-of-Life plan for most of its desktop Kaby Lake and remaining Skylake processors. The boxed and tray versions of the chips will be available for interested parties for one more year and then will become history. The move will enable Intel to cut the number of product SKUs it offers to partners and reduce pressure on its factory network, which will help to increase supply of newer products made using various versions of Intel’s 14 nm process technology.

Introduced early in 2017, Intel’s desktop 7th Generation Core processors (Kaby Lake) have been around for nearly three years now. The CPUs certainly served their purpose, but it is time for them to go and Intel recommends its partners to place their final orders on these products by April 24, 2020. The final shipments will be made by October 9, 2020. Some of Intel’s Kaby Lake and Skylake products will be moved to Internet of Things (IoT) status and will be available for a little longer to IoT customers and probably some PC makers as there are still previous-generation motherboards on the market that need to be sold.

Intel Kaby Lake S SKUs
  Status Last Shipment Date
for EOLed CPUs
Tray Boxed
Core i7-7700K EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Core i7-7700 IoT EOL October 9, 2020
Core i7-7700T IoT EOL October 9, 2020
Core i5-7600K EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Core i5-7600 EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Core i5-7600T EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Core i5-7500 IoT EOL October 9, 2020
Core i5-7500T IoT EOL October 9, 2020
Core i5-7400 EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Core i5-7400T EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Core i3-7350K EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Core i3-7320 EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Core i3-7300 EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Core i3-7300T EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Core i3-7100 EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Core i3-7100T EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Pentium G4620 EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Pentium G4600 EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Pentium G4560 EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Pentium G4560T EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Celeron G3950 EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Celeron G3930 EOL EOL October 9, 2020
Celeron G3930E Launched Launched -
Celeron G3930T Launched Launched -
Celeron G3930TE Launched Launched -

Intel’s desktop 6th Generation Core CPUs were launched in 2016 and most of them have been in EOL status for a while. This week, Intel said it would stop taking orders on the remaining desktop Skylake products on April 24, 2020, and will cease their shipments by October 9, 2020.

Intel Skylake S SKUs
  Status Last Shipment Date
for EOLed CPUs
Tray Boxed
Core i7-6700K EOL EOL September 7, 2018
Core i7-6700 IoT EOL October 9, 2020
Core i7-6700T EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Core i5-6600K EOL EOL September 7, 2018
Core i5-6600 EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Core i5-6600T EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Core i5-6500 IoT EOL October 9, 2020
Core i5-6500T EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Core i5-6402P EOL EOL September 7, 2018
Core i5-6400 EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Core i5-6400T EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Core i3-6320 EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Core i3-6300 EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Core i3-6300T EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Core i3-6100 EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Core i3-6100T EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Core i3-6098P EOL EOL September 7, 2018
Pentium G4520 EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Pentium G4500 EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Pentium G4500T EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Pentium G4400 EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Pentium G4400T EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Celeron G3920 EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Celeron G3900 EOL EOL March 6, 2020
Celeron G3900T EOL EOL March 6, 2020

Winding down production of desktop Skylake and Kaby Lake processors in the next few months will free manufacturing capacities for newer Intel products and will enable the company to increase shipments of newer CPUs, such as 8th and 9th Generation Coffee Lake, that are also made using Intel’s 14 nm fabrication technology.

   

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Source: Intel

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  • bhtooefr - Sunday, October 13, 2019 - link

    AFAIK, the answer basically boils down to Windows 7.

    Windows 7 won't run on anything newer than Skylake (but it will run on a 200-series platform even with a Skylake processor). So, you need Skylakes for that.

    And, if you're still producing 200-series platforms, have Kaby Lakes around for those using Win10 on those platforms, so only the CPU has to be different between Win7 and Win10 deployments?
    Reply
  • RavenRampkin - Sunday, October 13, 2019 - link

    iirc AMD is still making FXes too, if I'm not mistaken Reply
  • jgraham11 - Thursday, October 10, 2019 - link

    Remember when Intel released another Quad Core as their mainstream high-end processor, then AMD came out with Ryzen, a processor that had double the cores and it forced them to announce 8th Gen only 3 months after starting to sell this generation... Competition is a good thing otherwise we would still be stuck at 4 hyper-threaded cores for the high-end. Reply
  • eek2121 - Thursday, October 10, 2019 - link

    This has nothing to do with competition. This is about freeing up node space for future 14nm parts, which in turn allows them to ramp up 10nm. Reply
  • bananaforscale - Saturday, October 12, 2019 - link

    And 10nm has nothing to do with competition? :P Reply
  • PeachNCream - Thursday, October 10, 2019 - link

    It is interesting to watch Intel scramble to respond to AMD, but I don't think killing off desktop Kaby Lake is a result of any specific AMD activities. Desktop sales are sluggish at best to begin with. A few workstations in limited roles in businesses are being purchased and there are the low-volume gaming boxes out there, but the reality is that Joe Average buys a laptop (or just uses a mobile phone) and companies and governments issue out bland Probooks and Latitudes for most of their workforce. Reply
  • Qasar - Thursday, October 10, 2019 - link

    maybe where you are PeachNCream, but no one i know has any interest in a notebook, they have, and keep using desktops. i dont think, Joe average as you put it buys laptops as much as you say, but that could also be just the region, area or city too. Reply
  • PeachNCream - Friday, October 11, 2019 - link

    I don't put a great deal of faith in hardware sales surveys, but what I have seen published over the last decade or so seems to indicate an overall, long-running trend away from desktop computers. They are a shrinking market. There's nothing wrong with them as they have their uses and benefits, but I am going to stick to it that new purchases have been leaning toward more portable and mobile computing solutions. Reply
  • Qasar - Friday, October 11, 2019 - link

    still, maybe where you are, and " what I have seen published over the last decade or so seems to indicate " well, for here, that seems to be the opposite :-) i guess... this is one of those, agree to disagree, things :-) Reply
  • Diji1 - Monday, October 14, 2019 - link

    The reason Intel was not that concerned about Ryzen is that desktop market is relatively low margin compared to mobile and server.

    They recently shit themselves when it became apparent that Ryzen is a threat to their share of the server market.
    Reply

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