A motherboard maker has added support for AMD’s yet-to-be-announced Ryzen 9 3900 CPU. The product will be one of the industry’s first 12-core CPU featuring a mainstream TDP of 65 W. In addition, the same manufacturer revealed that there is a Pro version of the said CPU incoming.

Biostar’s X470NH motherboard recently gained support for AMD’s yet-to-be-announced Ryzen 9 3900 CPU with a 65 W TDP, which may indicate that the launch of the unit is imminent. This is not the first time an unannounced CPU has been listed in a CPU validation list. As a second source, the processor was listed in Eurasian Economic Union’s index of crypto-capable devices as a ‘twelve-core microprocessor’.

AMD Ryzen 3000 9 Series CPUs
AnandTech Cores
Threads
Base
Freq
Boost
Freq
L2
Cache
L3
Cache
PCIe
4.0
TDP Launch Date Price
(SEP)
Ryzen 9 3950X 16C 32T 3.5 4.7 8 MB 64 MB 16+4+4 105W Nov. 2019 $749
Ryzen 9 3900X 12C 24T 3.8 4.6 6 MB 64 MB 16+4+4 105W July 2019 $499
Ryzen 9 3900 12C 24T 3.1 4.2? 6 MB 64 MB 16+4+4 65W ? ?

Based on the information provided by the sources, AMD’s Ryzen 9 3900 is a 12-core CPU with SMT that operates at 3.1 GHz default frequency (and presumably featuring a 4.2 GHz maximum turbo frequency from a 3DMark listing) and a 65 W TDP. The relatively low thermal envelope makes the Ryzen 9 3900 compatible with mainstream motherboards and cooling systems and enables PC makers to build relatively small computers featuring a 12-core processor. Meanwhile, the Ryzen 9 Pro 3900 adds various security technologies, enterprise management, and reliability enhancements for business and corporate computers.

It is unclear when exactly AMD plans to introduce its 12-core Ryzen 9 3900 and Ryzen 9 Pro 3900 processors and how much will they cost, yet it is reasonable to think that both products will be available in the near future.

Related Reading:

Sources: Biostar (via momomo_us/Twitter), EAUnion.org (via Planet3DNow)

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  • Alexvrb - Saturday, September 28, 2019 - link

    With that being said, the performance hit varies a great deal by load. Typical desktop usage even worst case is probably 5-10% on average. Less for newer architectures.

    However, storage benchmarks are going to show a different story. Any heavy storage workload suffers quite a bit - don't measure FPS, measure loading time on a game that is notorious for disk thrashing. First loading up a No Man's Sky save when you last parked yourself in a complex base, for example.
    Reply
  • Reflex - Saturday, September 28, 2019 - link

    The storage story has been improving as well, its a moving target and for typical users its negligible.

    To be clear, I am fine with talking about these issues. My issue comes with exaggeration. That helps nobody at all aside from fanboys trying to make their holy wars seem more valid. Nobody at home is seeing a 50% perf drop, even on an old architecture with all mitigations. No home users is seeing even a 20% drop for any typical task.

    The real issue from my perspective is less about hypothetical perf drops and more about how these issues will impact security down the road, as well as what other devices have unknown side channel attacks. I know it has been demonstrated on some network interfaces, for instance.
    Reply
  • MDD1963 - Friday, September 27, 2019 - link

    We don't need to experience the performance hits to simply quote (spew) the 'sky is falling' statistics with all the worst case scenarios we read on 'the internet', but, instead simply treat them as gospel, even for still 'hypothetical' exploits. To quote Dick Jones..."Who cares if it works!" Reply
  • rahvin - Friday, September 27, 2019 - link

    Timing attacks (disovered in 2010 IIRC) were only hypothetical until Spectre was demonstrated. There is working exploit code for each Spectre Variants, that's demonstrated not hypothetical.

    I don't know if these exploits have been found being used in the wild yet, but with demonstrated exploit code it's simply a matter of time until these exploits make it into the active exploits.
    Reply
  • svan1971 - Thursday, September 26, 2019 - link

    Great, I hear the 3900x will be available also, only 3 months after it was released. Reply
  • Gothmoth - Thursday, September 26, 2019 - link

    better late than intel.

    i hear their 10nm process is finally coming into gear after what 3-4 years?

    what is 3 month compared to that. and amazon has the 3900x here.. onyl 12 but it is available.
    Reply
  • AshlayW - Thursday, September 26, 2019 - link

    +1 you nailed it with this comment. Reply
  • Slash3 - Thursday, September 26, 2019 - link

    Unfortunately Amazon in the US hasn't had the 3900X in stock (vs preorder) since August 16th.

    https://www.nowinstock.net/full_historydetails/112...
    Reply
  • Korguz - Thursday, September 26, 2019 - link

    a local store i go to, has 20 3900x's in stock :-) like i tried to explain to some one else who said the 3900X isnt available, there ARE other stores OTHER then new egg and amazon. Reply
  • rahvin - Thursday, September 26, 2019 - link

    That's not true, I saw it available for an hour or so a couple weeks ago, around the first week of September. That website's not doing a very good job monitoring. It comes in stock every so often and then is sold out again within an hours of being made available at the MSRP.

    I think anytime is becomes available bots buy up the stock and relist it at higher prices.
    Reply

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