GPU Performance & Power

On the GPU side of things, Qualcomm has long been leading the benchmark charts with the help of their in-house Adreno GPU architecture. With the Galaxy S10, we again see a new round of Adreno vs Mali in the Snapdragon and Exynos variants of the phone.

The Adreno 640 in the Snapdragon 855 has relatively conservative performance targets this generation. Here Qualcomm promises 20% better performance even though the GPU itself has a reported 50% more execution units. What has happened is that Qualcomm has dropped the clock frequency from 710MHz down to 585MHz, account for where most of that theoretical GPU performance is missing. The rationale here is to be able to run wider and slower, and thus more efficiently.

On the Exynos side of things, the new chip adopts a new Mali G76MP12 GPU clocked in at up to 702MHz. We’re already seen the GPU inside of the Kirin 980, however for whatever reason Samsung S.LSI has always been able to achieve better results than HiSilicon for several generations in a row, so it’ll be interesting to see how these two chipsets differ.

Starting off with the 3Dmark Sling Shot Extreme Unlimited test suite, the Physics workload is mostly a CPU bound test within a GPU thermally constrained scenario.

3DMark Sling Shot 3.1 Extreme Unlimited - Physics

The Exynos 9820 surprisingly takes the performance lead between both Galaxy S10 units. The result here is a very big change compared to previous generation Exynos SoCs. I hadn’t had the time to investigate if this is actually caused by improvements of the new M4 core or if the workload is being scheduled on the A75 cores. Both peak performance and sustained performance here are very good and are only beaten by Kirin 980 devices.

The Snapdragon 855 Galaxy S10 also posts excellent peak perf results, however the CPU seem to throttle quite a bit more, falling in line with what last year’s Snapdragon 845 devices were scoring.

3DMark Sling Shot 3.1 Extreme Unlimited - Graphics 

In the Graphics score of the workload, we come back to the familiar dominance of Qualcomm GPUs. What is interesting to see here is that both Galaxy S10 units sport worse sustained performance than the Note9 with last year’s chipsets. Most likely this is due to different thermal limits on these two Samsung devices.

GFXBench Aztec Ruins - High - Vulkan/Metal - Off-screen GFXBench Aztec Ruins - Normal - Vulkan/Metal - Off-screen

In the new GFXBench Aztec Ruins tests, the Exynos unit takes the lead in terms of sustained performance in the High variant test, only beaten by Apple’s newest iPhones. The phone doesn’t seem to reproduce the same lead in the Normal variant and subsequently slightly trails the Snapdragon 855 version. In sustained performance, the Exynos S10 beats last year’s predecessors, however the Qualcomm chip merely matches some of the better Snapdragon 845 devices from last year.

GFXBench Manhattan 3.1 Off-screen

In Manhattan 3.1 Off-screen, we see both S10’s neck-in-neck in peak performance, and sustained performance also doesn’t seem all that different. The Exynos variant again shows big leaps over last year’s G72MP18 GPU, and the Qualcomm variant again is only able to match or actually lose out to some of the more thermally aggressive Snapdragon 845 units from last year.

GFXBench Manhattan 3.1 Offscreen Power Efficiency
(System Active Power)
  Mfc. Process FPS Avg. Power
(W)
Perf/W
Efficiency
iPhone XS (A12) Warm 7FF 76.51 3.79 20.18 fps/W
iPhone XS (A12) Cold / Peak 7FF 103.83 5.98 17.36 fps/W
Galaxy 10+ (Snapdragon 855) 7FF 70.67 4.88 14.46 fps/W
Galaxy 10+ (Exynos 9820) 8LPP 68.87 5.10 13.48 fps/W
Galaxy S9+ (Snapdragon 845) 10LPP 61.16 5.01 11.99 fps/W
Huawei Mate 20 Pro (Kirin 980) 7FF 54.54 4.57 11.93 fps/W
Galaxy S9 (Exynos 9810) 10LPP 46.04 4.08 11.28 fps/W
Galaxy S8 (Snapdragon 835) 10LPE 38.90 3.79 10.26 fps/W
LeEco Le Pro3 (Snapdragon 821) 14LPP 33.04 4.18 7.90 fps/W
Galaxy S7 (Snapdragon 820) 14LPP 30.98 3.98 7.78 fps/W
Huawei Mate 10 (Kirin 970) 10FF 37.66 6.33 5.94 fps/W
Galaxy S8 (Exynos 8895) 10LPE 42.49 7.35 5.78 fps/W
Galaxy S7 (Exynos 8890) 14LPP 29.41 5.95 4.94 fps/W
Meizu PRO 5 (Exynos 7420) 14LPE 14.45 3.47 4.16 fps/W
Nexus 6P (Snapdragon 810 v2.1) 20Soc 21.94 5.44 4.03 fps/W
Huawei Mate 8 (Kirin 950) 16FF+ 10.37 2.75 3.77 fps/W
Huawei Mate 9 (Kirin 960) 16FFC 32.49 8.63 3.77 fps/W
Huawei P9 (Kirin 955) 16FF+ 10.59 2.98 3.55 fps/W

Looking at the power consumption and efficiency tables in Manhattan 3.1, we see both devices showcase quite similar characteristics. Performance is very close in both chipsets, with also very similar power consumption within 220mW of each other. The efficiency also is quite close to each other. Interestingly both Qualcomm and Samsung weren’t able to close the gap to Apple’s latest iPhones and the A12 which still has a considerable performance and power efficiency lead.

For the Exynos chipset, it’s also unfortunate to see that absolute power has gone up by 1W, meaning the device will heat up faster, even though performance and efficiency is better.

GFXBench T-Rex 2.7 Off-screen

In T-Rex we again see both chipsets perform very similarly with similar sustained performance figures.

GFXBench T-Rex Offscreen Power Efficiency
(System Active Power)
  Mfc. Process FPS Avg. Power
(W)
Perf/W
Efficiency
iPhone XS (A12) Warm 7FF 197.80 3.95 50.07 fps/W
iPhone XS (A12) Cold / Peak 7FF 271.86 6.10 44.56 fps/W
Galaxy 10+ (Snapdragon 855) 7FF 167.16 4.10 40.70 fps/W
Galaxy S9+ (Snapdragon 845) 10LPP 150.40 4.42 34.00 fps/W
Galaxy 10+ (Exynos 9820) 8LPP 166.00 4.96 33.40fps/W
Galaxy S9 (Exynos 9810) 10LPP 141.91 4.34 32.67 fps/W
Galaxy S8 (Snapdragon 835) 10LPE 108.20 3.45 31.31 fps/W
Huawei Mate 20 Pro (Kirin 980) 7FF 135.75 4.64 29.25 fps/W
LeEco Le Pro3 (Snapdragon 821) 14LPP 94.97 3.91 24.26 fps/W
Galaxy S7 (Snapdragon 820) 14LPP 90.59 4.18 21.67 fps/W
Galaxy S8 (Exynos 8895) 10LPE 121.00 5.86 20.65 fps/W
Galaxy S7 (Exynos 8890) 14LPP 87.00 4.70 18.51 fps/W
Huawei Mate 10 (Kirin 970) 10FF 127.25 7.93 16.04 fps/W
Meizu PRO 5 (Exynos 7420) 14LPE 55.67 3.83 14.54 fps/W
Nexus 6P (Snapdragon 810 v2.1) 20Soc 58.97 4.70 12.54 fps/W
Huawei Mate 8 (Kirin 950) 16FF+ 41.69 3.58 11.64 fps/W
Huawei P9 (Kirin 955) 16FF+ 40.42 3.68 10.98 fps/W
Huawei Mate 9 (Kirin 960) 16FFC 99.16 9.51 10.42 fps/W

In the power end efficiency tables we however see a big difference between the two devices. Here Qualcomm is able to clearly achieve lower power and higher efficiency than the Exynos.

One thing that I note on both Galaxy S10 units is that I again saw some very odd thermal behaviour on the part of the Qualcomm unit. Just like we measured on the Note9 a few months ago, the Qualcomm Galaxy S10+ reached much higher initial temperatures than the Exynos S10+. I measured peak skin temperatures on the front screen near the SoC nearing 49°C on the S855 unit while the E9820 peaked around 43°C. Again, much like last year, this seems to be a time-bound boost mechanism as after a certain period of around 20 minutes the Snapdragon unit throttles down to a sustained 42-43°C. What this means is that the Snapdragon unit has higher (longer) peak performance figures at a cost of a hotter device, before both devices equalise at a sustained ~42°C.

Overall, the Snapdragon unit this year does still have a performance and efficiency lead, however the gap has been narrowed compared to what we’ve seen in the past years. The new Mali G76 looks to have made solid improvements, and ALU heavy workloads in particular have seen very large leaps compared to the Exynos 9810.

The Adreno 640 this generation just seems quite conservative – Apple has taken Qualcomm’s performance crown in mobile and most importantly also the efficiency crown. Both the Snapdragon 855 and A12 are both manufactured on the same process node so it’s a valid Dragon-to-Apples comparison, and here Qualcomm is beaten by such a significant margin of which in the past we’ve only been used to seeing Qualcomm beat Arm with. For the next generation, we thus hope both Qualcomm and Arm will be able to show more significant jumps in both performance and efficiency. Samsung’s own GPU is also a wildcard, however I’m not expecting to see this productised in next year’s Exynos.

System Performance Display Measurement
POST A COMMENT

228 Comments

View All Comments

  • Samus - Sunday, March 31, 2019 - link

    They should have gone with a pop-out camera than the hole punch. Hate to say it but apples notch was the best solution other than a pop-up camera. Reply
  • Javert89 - Sunday, March 31, 2019 - link

    Just a precisation. Adreno 640 do not have 50% more execution units, indeed it should be the usual 2 core design seen in the 630.. only the Adreno of the bigger Snapdragon 8cx has 3 cores plus a 128 bit memory controller Reply
  • Andrei Frumusanu - Sunday, March 31, 2019 - link

    It *does* have 50% more execution units / ALUs; https://images.anandtech.com/doci/13680/Screenshot... Reply
  • bjtags - Sunday, March 31, 2019 - link

    Huawei Mate SE 99% of this for 1/4 the Price..... Reply
  • s.yu - Monday, April 1, 2019 - link

    Entirely laughable. Reply
  • tipoo - Sunday, March 31, 2019 - link

    The efficiency + performance of the A12 even in comparison to this continues to be crazy, and we're on the other side of the year of that launching.

    I'd be really interested to see that put against x86 cores in SPEC2006
    Reply
  • name99 - Monday, April 1, 2019 - link

    Here you are. Not a PERFECT comparison but the best currently available:

    https://www.anandtech.com/show/13392/the-iphone-xs...

    https://www.anandtech.com/show/11544/intel-skylake...

    Would be great if we had comparison graphs, and if it were compiler to compiler (both LLVM) and if it were desktop cores, and if it were Coffee Lake, and ...
    But as I said it's the best available right now.

    Basically (especially if Apple adds SVE to their desktop ARM core) they probably have nothing to fear in terms of reduced performance by switching to the A12 successor.
    Reply
  • s.yu - Monday, April 1, 2019 - link

    I gotta say I'm surprised from the first sample that the S9+ was the best among the Samsung's and very, very close to Pixel performance which is still overall No.1, S10PS only comes second, S10PE is about as bad as the Note9, I think some of these have defective lenses with especially bad resolution on the edge(s)...the difference is much smaller in the center of the frame. So it could be said that even with the f/2.4 aperture, the Samsung's lens has QC issues that aren't masked. It would be interesting to see how P30P's f/1.6 lens fares.
    S9+ didn't stand out so much in the HDR scenes though, but from the landscapes I'd say the S9+ probably got an especially good lens sample, better than the S10PS and much better than the S10PE. How the Pixel reproduces texture is just incredible, though many of the scenes are rendered darker, there's little sign of the crushed black issue, i.e. it's just darker, but high quality, it's still my definition of realistic among almost any smartphone output, it would obviously stand better to sharpening or NR in post.
    Regarding the wide shots...HDR's the differential. The S10PS outperformed the Mate20P despite a wider FoV in most of the landscape samples, but failed to do so in the shot under the bridge.
    IMO in low light shots the PS still wins overall, to the PE, PE seems to have issues mapping black (with minimal actual shadow advantage) while in the midtones as both win in certain instances it's a toss. Still nothing beats the Pixel...Mate20P's auto was especially bad in the maintenance center shot, that was interesting considering the sensor size.
    And I have to disagree just from the first night sample that the PS isn't matching Mate20P's night mode, it's evident that it did a poor job on the sand, but *everything else* on the frame is better, the subject, the houses in the background, the light posts. It is clear in the second night mode shot with a low DR range though, that the Samsung's messed up.
    Reply
  • lty0432 - Monday, April 1, 2019 - link

    Hi author !
    I think this kind of technical articles on Exynos and SD has been best out there.
    Can I possible get your opinion on how mobile processors stack up against PC processors ?
    Are there any benchmark comparison articles ?
    Reply
  • Andrei Frumusanu - Monday, April 1, 2019 - link

    I have a larger scale article on this topic in the coming months. Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now