If you were paying close attention to this morning’s announcement of AMD’s new Ryzen Pro SKUs, then you likely noticed something interesting: the non-X PRO chips all have the same performance specifications as their standard consumer counterparts. Specifically, both of the non-X PRO SKUs with existing Ryzen 5 & 7 counterparts have the same core counts, clockspeeds, and TDPs. And for the final 2 Ryzen PRO 3 SKUS? Well, AMD has inadvertently shown their hand here when it comes to forthcoming Ryzen 3.

With the release of the Ryzen PRO 3 specifications, AMD has now confirmed what we’ve been suspecting for the Ryzen 3 specifications for a while now. Ryzen 3 is a quad-core CPU without SMT, so we’re looking at just 4 threads instead of 8, albeit 4 threads without any of the resource contention SMT can sometimes cause. On which matter, it’s worth pointing out that AMD has already previously commented that Ryzen 3 will use the same die as Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7, so we’re looking at 4 cores distributed over 2 CCXs, like the Ryzen 5 1400 & 1500X.

AMD Ryzen 5 & 3 SKUs
  Cores/
Threads
Base/
Turbo
XFR L3 TDP Cost Cooler
Ryzen 5 1600X 6/12 3.6/4.0 +100 16 MB 95 W $249 -
Ryzen 5 1600 6/12 3.2/3.6 +100 16 MB 65 W $219 Spire
Ryzen 5 1500X 4/8 3.5/3.7 +200 16 MB 65 W $189 Spire
Ryzen 5 1400 4/8 3.2/3.4 +50 8 MB 65 W $169 Stealth
Ryzen 3 1300* 4/4 3.5/3.7 TBD 8 MB 65 W TBD -
Ryzen 3 1200* 4/4 3.1/3.4 TBD 8 MB 65 W TBD -

Similarly, AMD’s reveal indicates that Ryzen 3 will have the same cache structure as the lowest-end Ryzen 5, the 1400. That means just half of the chip’s total 16MB of L3 cache is enabled. However each core still retains its full 512KB of L2 cache. Finally, this inadvertent reveal also confirms that TDPs for the lowest-end members of the Ryzen family will stick with the same 65W TDP as all but the highest-performance Ryzen chips.

Of course, it should be noted here that AMD’s accidental reveal doesn’t mean that the 1300 & 1200 will be the only Ryzen 3 chips we’ll see. Just like the Ryzen 5 and 7 only had a couple of PRO counterparts, it’s likely that the story will be the same for the Ryzen 3 series. In particular, Ian suspects a Ryzen 3 1300X will show up, but we shall see in due time…

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  • Glock24 - Thursday, June 29, 2017 - link

    You might be correct, but not everyone is willing to overclock and Ryzen in it's current iteration is not a very good overclocker.

    Most Ryzen CPUs achieve 3.8-3.9GHz stable clocks. The newer Pentiums range from 4.5 to 3.7GHz and now have HT, so they are basically lower clocked i3s. The newer i3s go from 3.9 to 4.1 (or 4.2 if you count the i3-7350K).

    In the end it all comes down to pricing ani3-7350Kd price/performance.
    Reply
  • jardows2 - Thursday, June 29, 2017 - link

    Is it that Ryzen is not a good overclocker, or that it does not overclock as well as the i7 K? It seems like the Ryzen chips are pretty reliable to overclock until the 4.0Ghz ceiling, and ALL Ryzen chips are overclockable, not just the premium ones. Reply
  • trparky - Thursday, June 29, 2017 - link

    Ryzen needs to get higher base clocks to really put the screws to Intel. Right now Ryzen chips can clock as high as 4 GHz but that's pretty much the GHz ceiling due to internal throttling. If AMD can somehow break the 4 GHz barrier (which I don't think will happen until 10nm process nodes from GloFlo) only then will Ryzen be the true Intel killer that we all wanted. Reply
  • Samus - Thursday, June 29, 2017 - link

    If we are talking overclocking, the current single thread champ is still the years old Pentium G3258, a $70 chip.

    I doubt Ryzen 3 will sell for <$70, and its platform costs is significantly higher than an H87 chipset motherboard...

    Back on point, ignore overclocking. 99% of customers will never overclock. AMD failed the last decade focusing on gamers. They need to focus on OEM's.
    Reply
  • shendxx - Thursday, June 29, 2017 - link

    lot benhcmark between R7 vs I7 kabylake which is i7 800Mhz - 1 Ghz more from Ryzen max OC capable,, is only lead 10 FPS in game that even not optimize for Zen CPU,, i dont see any Moar GHZ benefit in intel side when compare to real Quadcore,, Reply
  • shendxx - Thursday, June 29, 2017 - link

    pentium what ? Kabylake ?

    in what App that use higher IPC and Clockspeed ?

    i dont see any significant different from Kabylake to Zen,, especially people on this earth dont realize that Kabylake is third aka 3 gen 14nm from intel which is More optimized than Zen, Ryzen is first gen from AMD,, dont people think this is bad because 10 - 15 FPS different in game scenario.. i dont know what people think,, or AMD lose because that small number,,

    this is I5 in i3 price range,, similar people choice Pentium kabylake over i3 because of pricing, core i3 basically die by own intel product,, its really QuadCore in i3 price, you must use their mindset when buy Pentium instead core i3. the performance is not so far only 10% overall
    Reply
  • shendxx - Thursday, June 29, 2017 - link

    pentium what ? Kabylake ?

    in what App that use higher IPC and Clockspeed ?

    i dont see any significant different from Kabylake to Zen,, especially people on this earth dont realize that Kabylake is third aka 3 gen 14nm from intel which is More optimized than Zen, Ryzen is first gen from AMD,, dont people think this is bad because 10 - 15 FPS different in game scenario.. i dont know what people think,, or AMD lose because that small number,,

    this is I5 in i3 price range,, similar people choice Pentium kabylake over i3 because of pricing, core i3 basically die by own intel product,, its really QuadCore in i3 price, you must use their mindset when buy Pentium instead core i3. the performance is not so far only 10% overall
    Reply
  • ddriver - Thursday, June 29, 2017 - link

    What you miss is that single threaded applications are usually things that do not matter that much. Everything that is actually taxing and time staking will be threaded, and R3 will destroy an i3.

    Single threaded scenarios are 99.999% of the time "enough is enough" and don't really benefit from more. Say gaming - if CPU A can pull 150 FPS on your typical settings, then it is no big whoop if CPU B is able to hit 170 FPS. In any case you have enough performance.

    But if you say run a video encoding task, and if CPU A can complete it in an hour, but CPU B takes two hours, then it is a big deal.

    Face it, everything that actually needs all the performance it can get is multithreaded. Single threaded stuff is casual, which is why nobody took the time to make it concurrent.

    Thus an R3 will be fast enough in tasks an i3 might be slightly faster, but will destroy it completely in tasks where maximum raw performance really matters.

    And even thou I have gaming as an example above, the truth is that most games today can take advantage of 4 threads, and many will under-perform on an i3. This is not the "4770i vs ryzen" kinda thihg, where games do not really take full advantage of what ryzen has to offer, so the kind of software where the i3 will "shine" shrinks down even further.
    Reply
  • CajunArson - Thursday, June 29, 2017 - link

    There's a little too much emphasis about how this is some "inadvertent leak".

    Their own marketing department put together the slides and released them, and frankly there's nothing in there that's all that surprising or overly interesting to anybody who's aware of the existing RyZen lineup.
    Reply
  • Ian Cutress - Thursday, June 29, 2017 - link

    The PRO marketing department is different to the consumer marketing department. Different business units within the same company, almost like separate companies, using different PR agencies too. We wouldn't publish something like this without knowing details about how the system works. Reply

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