The Witcher 3

The third game in CD Projekt RED’s expansive RPG series, The Witcher 3 is our RPG benchmark of choice. Utilizing the company’s in-house engine, REDengine 3, The Witcher makes use of an array of DirectX 11 features, all of which combine to make the game both stunning and surprisingly GPU-intensive. Our benchmark is based on an action-heavy in-engine cutscene early in the game, and Hairworks is disabled.

The Witcher 3 - 3840x2160 - Ultra Quality (No Hairworks)

The Witcher 3 - 2560x1440 - Ultra Quality (No Hairworks)

NVIDIA primarily promotes the GTX 1080 Ti as a 4K card, and for good reason. Thanks to Bigger Pascal, NVIDIA finally has the performance to break 60fps on a number of games at 4K, with The Witcher 3 chief among them. At 60.1fps it just makes that mark, with virtually no room to spare.

Overall this game is a strong showing for NVIDIA’s newest card. The GTX 1080 Ti picks up another 32% over the GTX 1080, and 75% over the last-generation GTX 980 Ti.

Crysis 3 The Division
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  • Jon Tseng - Thursday, March 9, 2017 - link

    Launch day Anandtech review?

    My my wonders never cease! :-)
    Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Thursday, March 9, 2017 - link

    For my next trick, watch me pull a rabbit out of my hat. Reply
  • blanarahul - Thursday, March 9, 2017 - link

    Ooh. Reply
  • YukaKun - Thursday, March 9, 2017 - link

    /claps

    Good article as usual.

    Cheers!
    Reply
  • Yaldabaoth - Thursday, March 9, 2017 - link

    Rocky: "Again?" Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Thursday, March 9, 2017 - link

    No doubt about it. I gotta get another hat. Reply
  • Anonymous Blowhard - Thursday, March 9, 2017 - link

    And now here's something we hope you'll really like. Reply
  • close - Friday, March 10, 2017 - link

    Quick question: shouldn't the memory clock in the table on the fist page be expressed in Hz instead of bps being a clock and all? Or you could go with throughput but that would be just shy of 500GBps I think... Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Friday, March 10, 2017 - link

    Good question. Because of the various clocks within GDDR5(X)*, memory manufacturers prefer that we list the speed as bandwidth per pin instead of frequency. The end result is that the unit is in bps rather than Hz.

    * http://images.anandtech.com/doci/10325/GDDR5X_Cloc...
    Reply
  • close - Friday, March 10, 2017 - link

    Probably due to the QDR part that's not obvious from reading a just the frequency. Thanks. Reply

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