The Exterior of the Riotoro Prism CR1280

The Prism CR1280 sports a postmodern design, mostly based on complex geometric shapes with sharp angles and edges. Most of the case is black, with the exception of the silver aluminum feet. The steel frame and right side panel of the case are well sprayed with a matte black paint, as is the front part of the plastic faceplate. The surrounding frame of the plastic faceplate is sprayed with a highly reflective piano black paint. As for the left side panel, it is entirely made out of Plexiglas, creating an essentially frameless left side panel window.

Measuring 58 cm tall, 22.5 cm wide and 47.5 cm deep (22.8 × 8.7 × 18.7-inches), the Prism CR1280 is a relatively large tower case, especially for a model without a single external 5.25" device opening. With a volume of 0.062 m3 (62 liters), it is only slightly smaller than the similar Cooler Master MasterCase 5 (65.9 liters) and the cubic Corsair Carbide Air 540 (63.1 liters), but much larger than a typical Midi ATX case, such as the Corsair 450D (51.6 liters). Despite the size, the Prism CR1280 is relatively lightweight, tipping the scales at just 8 kg.

11.2 oz/330 ml soda can inserted as size reference

A look at the rear of the case reveals that the PSU compartment is located at its bottom, with a significant distance between it and the main system. Other than that, there is nothing of noteworthy to be discussed about the rear side of the Prism CR1280, except perhaps the observation that there are no round holes for liquid cooling systems and cables.

Riotoro placed the front I/O ports and buttons at the top front of the case, on a slightly tilted surface. Considering that the case is rather tall, the position of the buttons and I/O ports clearly favors placement under a desk, which makes the use of a windowed side panel rather questionable. The larger power-on button can be seen to the left, followed by the RGB lighting and the fan speed control switches. The 3.5 mm audio jacks can be seen at the center of the formation, with the four USB ports (2 × USB 2.0, 2 × USB 3.0) to their right. A strangely large reset key rests to the rightmost part of the formation.

A Plexiglas cover can also be found at the top of the case, made of the same material as the side panel, just a little thinner. It actually has no specific function other than being a slight aesthetic decoration if the Prism CR1280 is left as is from the factory. However, we found that if the RGB fans are moved to the top of the case, the Plexiglas will absorb part of their light and appear as if the top of the case is being illuminated, creating a nice visual effect inside dark rooms.

Two large nylon filters can be found at the bottom of the case, one for the PSU and one for the HDD area. The PSU filter can be removed by pulling it from the back of the case, the HDD area filter from the front. The entire faceplate acts as a filter for the front intake fans as well but, strangely, the filter is not removable. The whole panel needs to come off and cleaned by using a strong blower or vacuum cleaner.

The large aluminum feet of the Prism CR1280 are very strong and add to the overall aesthetic value of the case. Rubber strips are installed to prevent the case from moving/sliding on a flat surface, as well as to prevent damaging softer surfaces. That being said, the edges of these aluminum feet are extremely sharp and can easily damage wooden, vinyl and other soft surfaces. Caution is required when handling the case while it is sitting on any soft surface, lifting it straight up and without tilting the case to any side, otherwise the very hard and sharp corners can easily damage the surface.

The I/O ports are surrounded by a plastic clear ring that is illuminated by several LEDs that provide very good and uniform distribution of the light. Riotoro's logo at the lower part of the faceplate is also illuminated, as the two included 120 mm cooling fans are.

When fully lit, the lighting of the Prism CR1280 is adequate as far as the faceplate and I/O area are concerned, but relatively weak to the interior of the case. There is only so much that half a dozen LEDs can do inside a case this large. The RGB lighting can be controlled by the button found at the top of the faceplate. It is almost amusing that the RGB button is right next to the power button, as one could imagine accidentally hitting the power button by accident.

The RGB capabilities of the Prism CR1280 are adequate, especially considering that there is no USB interface and everything is being controlled via a single button. Riotoro programmed the controller to have eight settings and the button simply cycles through them. The first six settings are standard colors (Red, Green, Blue, White, Yellow and Pink) and the seventh setting initiates the “rainbow” effect, slowly cycling through 256 colors. The eight setting is the “custom color” setting and simply holds whichever color was active on the “rainbow” setting when the button was pressed. If the button is pressed for three seconds, the controller turns the lighting off.

Introduction, Packaging & Bundle The Interior of the Riotoro Prism CR1280
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  • SaolDan - Tuesday, April 26, 2016 - link

    Neat!! Reply
  • Olaf van der Spek - Tuesday, April 26, 2016 - link

    You might be able to set the BIOS to power on after power loss and then use the switch on the PSU or an external switch. Reply
  • plopke - Tuesday, April 26, 2016 - link

    Speaking about cases , anyone know of a 5.25"front panel expansion with a new power button/reset button. I know Lian li and Scythe used to have some models but either very hard to get or extremely expensive because comes with lot of extras.

    <rant on>

    Maybe I am just unlucky, or it is Antec but goddammit do power button on cases get crappier and crappier these days and every time I look at a review of cases these days the words "flimsy/weak" tend to be used or quality is ignored. On the plus side cooling and noise are properly reviewed.

    Also quiet common to find the problem on the internet with following solutions :
    -get new front panel if the case still made
    -get new case("I GO UUURGRH inside")Speaking about cases , anyone know of a 5.25"front panel expansion with a new power button/reset button. I know Lian li and Scythe used to have some models but either very hard to get or extremely expensive because comes with lot of extras.

    <rant on>

    Maybe I am just unlucky, or it is Antec but goddammit do power button on cases get crappier and crappier these days and every time I look at a review of cases these days the words "flimsy/weak" tend to be used or quality is ignored. On the plus side cooling and noise are properly reviewed.

    Also quiet common to find the problem on the internet with following solutions :
    -super glue
    -horrible mess because the enteir panel is one big hump of glued together plastics
    -get new front panel if the case is still made
    -get new case("I GO UUURGRH inside")

    So in the end I was thinking of drilling a hole in a 5.25"bracket and putting for example one of these in it
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Phobya-system-cabinet-but...

    Sometimes I wishes the reviewer of a PC case put a robot on the button until it breaks :P.

    PS Luckely it isn't all bad , there actually still cases to be bought where the idea is not look as a neo lighted up brothel with a stealth fighter crashed into it.
    <rant off>
    Sorry I will stop being grumpy now , I tend to get grumpy when a easy problem turns into a day of googling !

    So in the end I was thinking of drilling a hole in a 5.25"bracket and putting for example one of these in it
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Phobya-system-cabinet-but...

    Sometimes I wishes the reviewer of a PC case put a robot on the button until it breaks :P.

    PS Luckely it isn't all bad , there actually still cases to be bought where the idea is not look as a neo lighted up brothel with a stealth fighter crashed into it.
    <rant off>
    Sorry I will stop being grumpy now , I tend to get grumpy when a easy problem turns into a day of googling !
    Reply
  • plopke - Tuesday, April 26, 2016 - link

    Woeps Reply
  • plopke - Tuesday, April 26, 2016 - link

    I kinda went a bit crazy with copy paste after logging in Reply
  • Murloc - Tuesday, April 26, 2016 - link

    yeah it kinda makes you look cray-cray.

    I don't push the button more than once a day but I've never had or heard of any issues with cooler master cases.
    Reply
  • fluxtatic - Wednesday, April 27, 2016 - link

    That would have been pretty much exactly what I would have suggested, drill a hole in one of the 5.25" blanks and put in vandal-resistant switch.

    On another note, I think it's you - I've never had a problem with a power switch in any case I've ever owned.
    Reply
  • JohnMD1022 - Saturday, June 04, 2016 - link

    I only power off/on once a month or so. Reply
  • Valantar - Tuesday, April 26, 2016 - link

    Any idea if Riotoro will expand distribution to Europe in the near future? For my next platform upgrade, I want a smaller chassis, and their CR1080 seems to be the _only_ compact, full ATX + full length ATX PSU case out there that doesn't look like utter sh*t. I don't mind moving to mATX, but the selection there isn't that much better, tbh. The Kimera Cerberus looks awesome, but it's not available (yet, perhaps ever), and $250 is a lot for a case. Reply
  • britjh22 - Tuesday, April 26, 2016 - link

    Wow, having just built a system in a Zalman H1, I really wish I had seen this case first. I love the placement of the 2.5 & 3.5 drives. Reply

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