Chrome - AnandTech Frontpage

Chrome is the de-facto browser application on a lot of Android devices. We again use it to load the AnandTech frontpage and to analyse the CPU's behaviour. 
 
Starting off with the little cores:

Off the bat we see quite a large difference in the power state distribution graphs. Chrome seems to place much higher load on the little cores compared to S-Browser. When looking at the run-queue chart we see that indeed all cores are almost at their full capacity for a large amount of time. 

What stands out though is a very large peak around the 4s mark. Here we see the little cores peak up to almost 7 threads, which is quite unexpected. This burst seems to overload the little cluster's capacity. The frequency also peaks to 1.3GHz at this point. The reason we don't see it go higher is probably that the threads are still big enough that they're picked up by the scheduler and migrated over to the big cluster at that point.

The big cores also see a fair amount of load. Similarly to the S-Browser we have 1 very large thread that puts a consistent load on 1 CPU. But curiously enough we also see some significant activity on up to 2 other big cores. Again, in terms of burst loads we see up to 3 big CPUs being used concurrently.

The total run-queue depths for the system looks very different for Chrome. We see a consistent use of 4-5 cores and a large burst of up to 8 threads. This is a very surprisng finding and impact on the way we perceive the core count usage of Chrome.

Browser: S-Browser - AnandTech Frontpage Browser: Chrome - BBC Frontpage
POST A COMMENT

156 Comments

View All Comments

  • ingwe - Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - link

    Yes that would be very interesting. I am always curious about how synthetics actually compare to more real world applications. Reply
  • Azethoth - Thursday, September 3, 2015 - link

    Every single synthetic I have ever seen vastly exaggerates the benefit. I would be interested in an actual real world use case that actually matches a synthetic. It would blow my mind if there are any. Reply
  • Andrei Frumusanu - Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - link

    I'll do a follow-up pipeline on this if the interest is high enough. Reply
  • bug77 - Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - link

    High enough +1.
    Please do the follow-up.
    Reply
  • tipoo - Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - link

    I'd definitely be interested. Reply
  • Drumsticks - Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - link

    Yes! This would be neat. Also, great article! Reply
  • ThisIsChrisKim - Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - link

    Yes, Would love a follow-up. Reply
  • HanakoIkezawa - Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - link

    I'm not sure of the practicality, but I would love to see a follow-up with Denver k1 and the A8X to see how lower core count out of order and in order SoCs are handled.

    This seriously was a fantastic article Andrei!
    Reply
  • kspirit - Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - link

    Yes please! +1 Reply
  • modulusshift - Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - link

    Heck yes. And of course I'm interested if anything like this is even remotely possible for Apple hardware, though likely it would require jailbreaks, at least. Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now