As the third largest motherboard maker in the world, ECS has always had the resources to pursue whatever direction they choose. In the past, that choice has been solid value motherboards, which provide quality and good value for the buyer. This has made ECS a major player in the Asian, South American, and European markets where tariffs and high prices relative to income make motherboards more relatively expensive than they are in the US. However, in the US market, ECS is often viewed as a low-cost, low-feature brand, and much of US sales come from the OEM market - ECS making motherboards and systems for others.

ECS has talked for some time about breaking new ground in the US market, and recently, they have also been hawking their Extreme series motherboards - boards designed with more of an eye to computer enthusiasts that still give great bang for the buck. We have said many times that it takes more than calling a board "Extreme" to make it so, but ECS has been improving the Extreme series and even won an Editors Choice for the ECS PF4 915P Extreme in last December's Intel 915 roundup. ECS keeps assuring the market that the change in direction for ECS is real, and to prove it, they invited AnandTech and about 20 other Editors to the very first ECS Editors Day in San Jose, California. The theme was the "New ECS".

ECS was prepared with their own demonstrations of future products from the "new ECS", but they also showcased partner presentations from Intel, AMD, ATI, and NVIDIA. So, is the "new" ECS really any different from what we've seen in the past? What technologies from Intel, AMD, ATI and NVIDIA will be finding their way to future ECS products?

SLI, Crossfire, and S.D.G.E.
POST A COMMENT

22 Comments

View All Comments

  • bhtooefr - Saturday, September 3, 2005 - link

    High FSB overclocking: On 939, that's more CPU dependent than chipset dependent. And, many 939 boards have really good OC options. And, as for the BX boards hitting high FSBs, that's Intel making a kickass chipset, not mobo makers making kickass mobos. If you want a high OCing P4/P-D, go get yourself an i925XE or i955X.

    Dual slots: WTF? First, slotted processors haven't been around for five years. Second, that's nothing any mobo maker can fix - again, it's a limitation of the CPUs. Seeing Intel's dual-core architecture, it's POSSIBLE to do a dual LGA775 for two single cores on an i945/955, but then again, the CPUs could also be locked out from SMP (unlikely, though - the only reason Celerons were locked out from SMP is that they used the same slot (slot 1)/socket (socket 370) as an SMP capable CPU, and someone figured out how to make it so that the Celery worked in SMP mode).
    Reply
  • smn198 - Monday, September 5, 2005 - link

    quote:

    High FSB overclocking: On 939, that's more CPU dependent than chipset dependent.
    I didn't mention a particular CPU type or package. I was listing some things that motherboard makers did with motherboards using the BX chipset.

    quote:

    Dual slots: WTF? First, slotted processors haven't been around for five years.

    Same again - I was listing some things that motherboard makers did with motherboards using the BX chipset.

    quote:

    Second, that's nothing any mobo maker can fix - again, it's a limitation of the CPUs.
    quote:

    Seeing Intel's dual-core architecture, it's POSSIBLE to do a dual LGA775 for two single cores on an i945/955
    So what are you trying to say? It seems you are contradicting yourself. Having a dual socket 939 board would be great if some clever motherboard maker could work out a way to make it happen. It has happened before with other CPUs and chipsets so it is not too far fetched to hope it could happen again.
    Reply
  • TheInvincibleMustard - Friday, September 2, 2005 - link

    Strange that Mr Fink here didn't say that ECS USA had merged with PCChips (even though both http://www.viperlair.com/articles/editorials/event...">ViperLair and http://www.hardocp.com/article.html?art=ODA4">Hard|OCP did so). Granted, this took place a while back, but if it was important enough for the CEO to comment on (and other tech sites), it's strange that it wasn't mentioned here. (what's even stranger is that I can't find really any mention of an ECS/PCChips merger on AT aside from a brief blurb in a VIA KT333 roundup -- http://www.google.com/search?num=50&hl=en&...">Google search ... maybe AT doesn't let robots go through its news sections?)

    Overall, though, I'm pretty impressed by the direction that ECS is heading -- it certainly seems as if they're aiming themselves more towards the enthusiast line of products, which is always nice as that will provide more competition. However, given ECS' previous track record, it seems as though they have a long ways to go before being able to compete head-to-head with the likes of DFI, ASUS, or MSI.
    Reply
  • KristopherKubicki - Friday, September 2, 2005 - link

    Actually, we have covered the PC Chips buyout of ECS for some time. During our factory tour of ECS back in Sept 2003, we detailed this very clearly:

    http://www.anandtech.com/mb/showdoc.aspx?i=1891&am...">http://www.anandtech.com/mb/showdoc.aspx?i=1891&am...

    To be pedantic, PC Chips owns all of ECS, not just ECS USA. For the conspiracy theorist inside, here are some other interesting bits of trivia:

    * ECS Manufacturers tons of OEM laptops; including a Taiwanese brand that starts "A" and ends in "cer"
    * ECS, while generally thought a low quality manufacturer, manufacturers most of Abit's PCB (at least they did during the time I visited their factory).
    * ECS's HK facility manufacturers the most motherboard connector components outside of Foxconn. Generally if it doesn't have Foxconn written on it, it's made by ECS/PCC.
    * Matsonic is also a PC Chips brand.

    Kristopher
    Reply
  • 4AcesIII - Saturday, September 3, 2005 - link

    Ah why then do you apparently seem to support such a manufacturer? If you reviewed cars would you be promoting the Yugo? People used to rely on Anandtech but I know I don't anymore and I'm beginning to believe that I'm not the only one here who thinks you've sold out. I don't care if one of you got a digital camera and now thinks they're a professional (recent photos from conventions and events show this to be completely false with pic quality hahahahahaha) and give advice on how to take pics? You should stick with computer components only, you can barely do a decent job of reviewing these let alone something that just plugs into the comp once in awhile. You seem to have sold out, your reviews reek of lies and falsehoods. ECS was bought by PC Chips so they could dump their crap inventory on unsuspecting customers and hide their name behind what they assumed was better than theirs reputation.....aaaaaaaaaannnnnntttt! someone should have told them that ECS is just as bad as they are but noooooooo Anandtech wants to attempt to mislead us into thinking ECS is all better now and they make good things, not PCB's stuck together with elmer's glue and string!!!!!!! If you want people to believe you, support you and say hmmm they just might know what they're talkin about then you've got somethings you need to do. First don't review crap components that EVERYONE agrees through experience that they're crap (in other words don't pea down our backs and tell us it's raining) secondly you need not play favorites (right now you looke like a big advertisement for EVGA, XFX and a couple of others) you tend to loose readers that way. In the end you will produce the exact opposite effect of what you wish. so go ahead there's always Sharky's Extreme and Tom's Hardware who don't seem to suffer from the kickbackitis as it would seem some are :) Reply
  • Phiro - Wednesday, September 7, 2005 - link

    quote:

    so go ahead there's always Sharky's Extreme and Tom's Hardware who don't seem to suffer from the kickbackitis


    wahahaha, to use the words "Tom's Hardware", "don't" and "kickbackitis" is the biggest joke on the internet.

    Thank you for making my tummy hurt from the laughing.

    You may or may not like Anandtech's content, but I still truly believe Anand is above being bought or unduly influenced by corporate dollars in his pocket.

    If you choose to believe otherwise, that's your choice. I'd advise you to quit reading his articles and in general perusing this website.
    Reply
  • Wesley Fink - Friday, September 2, 2005 - link

    I confess. This is a conspiracy to keep the vital information about PC Chips from our readers.

    In all seriousness, the "merger" of PC Chips and ECS is very old news - first announced many months ago. It is also not a true merger since there has always been a connection between ECS and PC Chips. The company just decided to reorganize the business so PC Chips now appears a full division of ECS.

    Frankly, we believed everyone already knew about this.
    Reply
  • rqle - Friday, September 2, 2005 - link

    Why would someone buy an addon board when nforce4 939 starts at $60 (newegg 939)? Price for a cheap 775 and a 939 board = cheaper and better then a 775 with a 939-adapter. Doesnt make much sense for the buyer.

    What I would buy:
    1. Socket 939 w/ PCI-E and and addon board that support SOCKET A.
    2. Socket 939 w/ PCI-E and and addon board that support Intel 478 and 479.
    These would be true upgrade path and not a rinky dinky buyer that cant choose between 775 and 939.

    If you own a 939 cpu, then buy a 939 board, you can spend the extra 45 bux if you like for a true cheap 775 board and let it collect dusk in the closet to make you get that "JUST IN CASE FEELING."
    Reply
  • TheGee - Friday, September 2, 2005 - link

    Not sure if I agree. If the main board has the latest tech on ie Gigabit lan. PCIe reasonable audio, DDR667 then it would suit some people to, say, buy a 939 sima with the upgrade till the end of that socket and then move to 940 when they become mainstream as long as the sima cards are a reasonable price it appears a good path to take. If there are no perfomance implications apart from maybe reduce OC capabilities which are not required by everyone. I can't see it being used to swap sima cards in and out just for the hell of it but I have a box of perfectly good MBs that I need to move on and this would be way of not being forced (by me!) to buy the latest every couple of months

    I know it's off topic but our thoughts are with the victims of the hurricane and hope that things improve soon.
    Reply
  • Furen - Friday, September 2, 2005 - link

    "with fewer pipelines, more cache, lower CPU speeds, yet higher performance."

    Fewer pipeline stages, fewer pipelines implies (to me) either less execution units or (I guess) non-fully-pipelined ones.
    Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now