During Computex 2019, GIGABYTE unveiled a wide variety of X570 motherboards stretching from the entry-level X570 Gaming X to the very high-end flagship, the X570 Aorus Xtreme. The GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Master slots in below the X570 Aorus Xtreme and has a range of high-end features such as 2.5 Gigabit LAN, three PCIe 4.0 M.2 slots, and Intel's Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax wireless interface.

The GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Master could be considered its flagship for general consumers with a price tag of $349 which situates it towards the top of the X570 range at launch. Included is support for up to 128 GB of DDR4 memory across its four slots, with three PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 slots each with its own individual M.2 heatsink, and six SATA ports. The boards networking capabilities include a Realtek RTL8125AG 2.5 G port with an assisting Intel Gigabit port, as well as an Intel AX200 802.11ax Wi-Fi 6 wireless interface which also includes support for BT 5 devices. There are three full-length PCIe 4.0 slots which operate at x16, x8/x8, and x8/x8/x4, with a single PCIe 4.0 x1 slot.

On the power delivery front, GIGABYTE is using a formidable setup with a 12+2 design with power stages rated for 50 A, and with two 8-pin 12 V ATX CPU power inputs. The onboard audio is handled by a Realtek ALC1220-VB HD audio codec and is complemented by an ESS Sabre 9118 DAC chip to enhance the auditory quality. On the rear panel is a Q-Flash Plus button for updating the firmware, a clear CMOS button, three USB 3.1 G1 Type-A, one USB 3.1 G2 Type-C, two USB 3.1 G1 Type-A and four USB 2.0 ports. 

GIGABYTE's X570 Aorus Master targets gamers and enthusiasts looking to push their processors further than the rated specifications, and will likely have good memory support for fast memory to make the most of the AMD Ryzen 3000 series Infinity Fabric Interconnect. The pricing reflects this with a price tag of $349 which puts it in the upper echelon, and the second most expensive X570 model from GIGABYTE set to launch on 7/7.

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  • Hixbot - Monday, June 17, 2019 - link

    Obviously people are interested in 10GbE for internal LAN (not ISP speed). You seem way off on your assumptions. I don't expect 10 GbE on a mid range gaming board, but I'm sure as heck interested in the feature. It's taking way too long for 10 GbE devices to become the standard on home devices. I think it will take widespread adoption on mainboards before things like 10GbE switches and NASs become affordable in the home consumer space. Reply
  • r3loaded - Thursday, June 13, 2019 - link

    Is it fanless? Reply
  • PeachNCream - Thursday, June 13, 2019 - link

    You'll have to wait until next generation when one of the bullet point features will be a fanless chipset which will be better than a chipset with active cooling that is currently being touted as better than a fanless chipset.

    Also, good to see gaping beak/flexing bicep bird is still around on Gigabyte products. I need a healthy dose of, "WTF am I looking at?!" when I see computer component mascots.
    Reply
  • svan1971 - Thursday, June 13, 2019 - link

    Agreed that Hawk beak thing has to go. Reply
  • gavbon - Thursday, June 13, 2019 - link

    Only model so far to be fanless is the X570 Aorus Xtreme Reply
  • Nephtys - Thursday, June 13, 2019 - link

    Buildzoid did a VRM & PCB analysis of that board and it's looking very good as they are not using phase doubling shenanigans. It's gonna be the board in my next build for sure! Reply
  • npz - Thursday, June 13, 2019 - link

    they and probably other companies realized they will have to avoid doubling and use real extra phases to overclock the 12 core and 16 core successfully. In stock form with XFR boosting within TDP limits (which is an actual limit per AMD) lower end boards will do ok, but I bet overclocking or just using PBO to auto-overclock beyond stock TDP would easily double the power Reply
  • ballsystemlord - Thursday, June 13, 2019 - link

    ATX MBs can fit 7x PCI(e) slots. Why are all these x570s only giving us 3 or 4? I know they are using some of that space for M.2 drives, but a PCIe 1x slot is quite workable and on plenty of x370 and x470 MBs.
    I'm just plain disappointed in the expansion options. I love the various PCI(e) cards you can add onto one of these MBs.
    Reply
  • TheUnhandledException - Thursday, June 13, 2019 - link

    Lack of PCIe lanes in consumer grade CPUs and market demand. What would you need seven expansion slots for. Hell even SLI is all but dead. Four expansion slots is plenty most users will use exactly one.

    If you want 7 full speed PCIe 16 lanes you likely want a workstation board. No not some leet gamer board pretending to be a workstation board but a real workstation board.
    Reply
  • npz - Thursday, June 13, 2019 - link

    No it's not the need for 7 full PCIE slots but rather say, 3 x PCIE x1 slots and 1 or 2 x PCIE x4 or PCIE x8 slots. And remember, if you use all three m.2 you LOSE an extra slot!

    It's an awful wast of a x16 slot just to plug in a x1 card in it. And it's also a waste of a fast powerful SATA port to use for an optical drive. I like to use x1 slots SATA controller for optical drive or USB 3 card since onboard chipset SATA ports are best suited for SSDs
    Reply

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