Just as quickly as it came into being, NVIDIA’s GeForce Partner Program has come to an end.

In a short article posted to their website today, NVIDIA’s Director of Product Marketing, John Teeple, announced that the program has been cancelled. In making the unexpected decision, Teeple stated “The rumors, conjecture and mistruths go far beyond its [the GeForce Partner Program’s] intent. Rather than battling misinformation, we have decided to cancel the program” and that “today we are pulling the plug on GPP to avoid any distraction from the super exciting work we’re doing to bring amazing advances to PC gaming.” No further information was provided on just what canceled entails, and what this means for existing program partners.

NVIDIA’s GeForce Partner Program is been divisive, to put it lightly. After news of it broke in March and was confirmed by NVIDIA, the program quickly attracted a good deal of negative attention out of concerns over what it meant for the competitive market, and a general degree of mean spiritedness. Adding fuel to the fire, few details of the program were ever confirmed by NVIDIA – with the company seeing little benefit in doing so – which left a great void open for rumors and unsourced reports of all kinds.

Ultimately NVIDIA’s goal with the program was to more thoroughly isolate its partner ecosystem, in the process ensuring that GeForce-aligned brands were just that: GeForce aligned, and that non-GeForce products weren’t sold under the same brand. NVIDIA cited this as a means of transparency so that consumers could be confident that they were buying GeForce products. In practice, the program left NVIDIA with a credibility problem, and the lack of details means that we’ll likely never know for sure the true extent of NVIDIA’s motivations with the program.

Even with this change, NVIDIA is looking to portray it as a positive (or at least neutral) change, noting that “This is a great time to be a GeForce partner and be part of the fastest growing gaming platform in the world. The GeForce gaming platform is rich with the most advanced technology.” Still, the lack of transparency means that it’s not clear what happens next for NVIDIA, or for that matter their partners who were already participating.

Some partners, particularly industry juggernaut ASUS, had already realigned their brands and had launched their AMD-specific brands, in ASUS’s case the new-yet-old Arez brand. The termination of the GeForce Partner Program presumably leaves the door open to ASUS folding these products back into their existing brands. However what they’ll actually do remains to be seen. It does no doubt bring a sigh of relief to AMD themselves, as AMD stood to be the biggest (corporate) loser as a result of the program, and has been ramping up their own “Freedom of Choice” advertising program.

Ultimately at the end of the day this means that the video card market returns to a state of status quo, at least for however long the newly revived status quo lasts.

Pulling the Plug on GPP, Leaning into GeForce

A lot has been said recently about our GeForce Partner Program. The rumors, conjecture and mistruths go far beyond its intent. Rather than battling misinformation, we have decided to cancel the program.

GPP had a simple goal – ensuring that gamers know what they are buying and can make a clear choice.

NVIDIA creates cutting-edge technologies for gamers. We have dedicated our lives to it. We do our work at a crazy intense level – investing billions to invent the future and ensure that amazing NVIDIA tech keeps coming. We do this work because we know gamers love it and appreciate it. Gamers want the best GPU tech. GPP was about making sure gamers who want NVIDIA tech get NVIDIA tech.

With GPP, we asked our partners to brand their products in a way that would be crystal clear. The choice of GPU greatly defines a gaming platform. So, the GPU brand should be clearly transparent – no substitute GPUs hidden behind a pile of techno-jargon.

Most partners agreed. They own their brands and GPP didn’t change that. They decide how they want to convey their product promise to gamers. Still, today we are pulling the plug on GPP to avoid any distraction from the super exciting work we’re doing to bring amazing advances to PC gaming.

This is a great time to be a GeForce partner and be part of the fastest growing gaming platform in the world. The GeForce gaming platform is rich with the most advanced technology. And with GeForce Experience, it is “the way it’s meant to be played.”

Source: NVIDIA

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  • ElvenLemming - Sunday, May 6, 2018 - link

    Considering that RoG isn't really a separate "line" of products so much as one of many descriptors, it wouldn't surprise me if they just add the RoG branding back to the AMD cards while keeping the Arez name as well. Reply
  • BurntMyBacon - Monday, May 7, 2018 - link

    This. I don't think it would hurt Asus to continue with distinct sub brands for their AMD and nVidia lines while keeping the primary branding consistent to the type of product.

    The bigger issue in my mind has always been the gaming laptops. Granted there hasn't been much interest in AMD's mobile gaming chips lately. However, the ability to lock AMD out of ROG laptops just because it uses the brand nVidia hijacked for their discrete GPU line was a particularly questionable result.
    Reply
  • cmvrgr - Friday, May 4, 2018 - link

    I hated the GPP program and I said that I will not buy an Nvidia gpu again. If they kill GPP that blackmailing piece of shit I will consider again buying one. Reply
  • BurntMyBacon - Monday, May 7, 2018 - link

    I think I'll still wait a little while yet before recommending their products to people, but I won't hesitate to use them as the situation calls for it now that they've abandoned GPP. I'll wait perhaps as much time as the program was active to allow for some small alteration back towards AMD and then it's back to entirely value based recommendations. Reply
  • guidryp - Friday, May 4, 2018 - link

    Translation: Rather than risk a lawsuit for anti-competitive behavior, we have decided to cancel the program. Reply
  • ಬುಲ್ವಿಂಕಲ್ ಜೆ ಮೂಸ್ - Friday, May 4, 2018 - link

    AMD's response to NVidia should be "Freedom of Choice (Unconditionally)"

    or......

    FOC-U!
    Reply
  • ads295 - Saturday, May 5, 2018 - link

    Is that Telugu? Reply
  • ಬುಲ್ವಿಂಕಲ್ ಜೆ ಮೂಸ್ - Saturday, May 5, 2018 - link

    Oh No's

    FOC-U is from the Cross Cultural Language of Middle Fingas
    Reply
  • ratbert1 - Friday, May 4, 2018 - link

    ^ this Reply
  • seamonkey79 - Friday, May 4, 2018 - link

    Yea, too little, too late. On top of that, the 'reasoning' with no further explanation kind of implies that all the bad views of GPP were more correct than the few details we got from them directly. Nice transparency. It's going to be awhile before I'm in the market to replace my 1080, but something major is going to have to happen to ruin AMD in the meantime before I'll buy Nvidia again. Reply

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