HP has started sales of its fourth-generation Z6 workstation, which pack one or two of Intel’s Xeon Scalable processor, NVIDIA’s Quadro RTX graphics cards, as well as up to 384 GB of memory. The new HP Z6 G4 machine is designed for graphics and compute intensive workloads and is aimed at VFX specialists, engineers and other creative professionals.

HP’s Z6 G4 workstation is based on one Intel Xeon W CPU or two Intel Xeon Scalable processors, with up to 48 cores in total. The machine can integrate up to 384 GB of DDR4 memory with ECC as well as six PCIe add-in-boards. Since the workstation has two PCIe 3.0 x16 slots, it can also feature two NVIDIA Quadro RTX 6000 graphics cards. In addition, the system can pack multiple SSDs and HDDs that offer tens of terabytes of storage space.

The key feature of HP’s Z6 G4 is its expandability and upgradeability. It may be configured with one Xeon W processor, but may be eventually upgraded to two Xeon Scalable CPUs using a special module. The machine comes with a 1000 W power supply, enough to feed the most power-hungry components.

HP’s Z6 workstations cost starting from $1,829 and sit between the company’s top-of-the-range dual-processor Z8 machine with up to four Quadro RTX 8000 graphics cards (which costs $2,489 and higher) as well as a more compact and affordable Z4 with two graphics cards that starts at $1359.

Like all HP Z workstations, the Z6 G4 comes with the company’s Sure Start self-healing BIOS capability, HP Sure Run security feature, HP Sure Recover  as well as a three-year warranty.

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Source: HP

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  • Count Rushmore - Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - link

    I wonder which company ( or person) would buy those with AMD Threadripper II in the horizon Reply
  • Kevin G - Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - link

    Those that have existing service contracts with HP, need the software vendor certification of select workstations and/or can't wait for the Threadripper updates that are on the horizon. Not all purchasing decisions come down to the hardware. Reply
  • 12345 - Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - link

    Yeah it took more almost a year after 2nd gen Ryzen came out before they were in an entry level HP workstation that was actually in stock. Reply
  • azrael- - Thursday, July 18, 2019 - link

    I guess you're thinking about the EliteDesk 705 G4 "Workstation". I put the last bit in citation marks because even *this* version doesn't support ECC memory. A workstation without ECC support is a workstation in name only.

    To be brutally honest I don't get why we don't much more Ryzen-based competition to Intel Xeon E-based workstations like HP's Z2 or Dell's Precision 3630. ECC is already baked into Ryzen and you get exceptional performance for a much lower price.
    Reply
  • 12345 - Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - link

    You mean threadripper 3? Threadripper 2 has been out for a year already. Reply
  • azrael- - Thursday, July 18, 2019 - link

    Technically, what you're calling Threadripper 2 isn't Threadripper 2, but rather the Threadripper 2000 series, built on Zen+. The next iteration of Threadripper (the 3000 series) will be built on Zen 2.

    In a way, you're both correct ...and both wrong.
    Reply
  • yetanotherhuman - Thursday, July 18, 2019 - link

    *III Reply
  • Xenith Systems - Thursday, July 18, 2019 - link

    AMD is not yet stable and reliable enough to put into a professional environment where reliability and customer support are key... Ryzen and threadripper is a new platform only in its third and second iteration respectively . Just with the launch of 3rd gen it begins to make sense to use it in a professional environment... Yet certain softwares are better optimized for intel platform... And AMD needs to catchup on driver front which will definitely take at least another year. Reply
  • Alistair - Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - link

    Didn't someone say something bonkers about Apple's pricing being in line with HP's workstations? $3114 (not $6000) and you get a 12 core system, not 8, with double the SSD storage of 512GB, all in a dual socket CPU system. Pretty sure the extra 3 grand can cover any deficiencies. Reply
  • tmanini - Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - link

    nope - that is only you that has dredged up the trollish comment. Never once in the article was Apple mentioned. Nor the comment stream (all 5 comments) *sigh* Reply

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