Dell has updated its rugged Latitude 12 tablet designed to operate in extreme conditions. The new Latitude 12 model 7212 is getting faster CPUs featuring the Skylake and Kaby Lake microarchitecture, a new 11.6” FHD display with an improved cover glass, a USB-C connector, a higher-capacity SSD option, and other improvements.

Dell launched its original Latitude 12 model 7202 rugged extreme tablet back in 2015. The unit was based on Intel’s Core M (Broadwell-Y) SoC and a set of mobile PC components capable of working in extreme conditions, but its main features were reinforced chassis, security technologies, vast communication capabilities as well as compatibility with various strengthened peripherals and special-purpose equipment. The new Latitude 12 model 7212 inherits virtually everything from the predecessor, but swaps internal hardware, changes the display and adds a couple of other things.

The Dell Latitude 12 tablet comes in the MIL-STD-810G-certified 24-mm thick enclosure made to withstand operating drops, thermal extremes, dust, sand, humidity, blowing rain, vibration, functional shock and all other kinds of physical impact. The slate has operating thermal range from -29°C to 63°C (20°F to 145°F), it can work in hazardous locations and withstand electromagnetic interference (MIL-STD-461F certified). In short, the Latitude 12 can work safely almost everywhere and in almost any circumstances — from a construction site, to a drilling site in the desert, to a battlefield.

Obviously, the rugged tablet is rather heavy (but not that heavy): the new Latitude 12 model 7212 weighs 1.27 kilograms with a 2-cell battery, like a full-fledged laptop. Dell says that the weight of the model 7212 is 27% lower compared to the original model 7202, but does not say how it managed to reduce the weight. Visually, the systems are similar and the new model is compatible with all of its predecessor's accessories. Yet, the Latitude 12 7202 and the Latitude 12 7212 are not completely identical: the new model has a new rigid handle option, it comes with new handles and straps that are easier to install and has a number of other advantages over the previous-gen model. Meanwhile, the optional RGB-backlit keyboard cover with kickstand for the Latitude 12 (also rugged, sealed and made for extremes) will further add weight and cost, if used.

As mentioned above, the Dell Latitude 12 model 7212 is based on Intel’s latest CPUs featuring their Skylake and Kaby Lake microarchitectures. In fact, Dell decided to use dual-core Core i-series Skylake-U and Kaby Lake-U SoCs instead of low-power Broadwell-Y to offer higher performance. Depending on exact SKU, the Latitude 12 7212 will come with 8 GB or 16 GB of LPDDR3 memory, Class 20 or 40 SSDs with 128 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB or 1 TB capacity, optional encryption capabilities,, as well as a 26 Wh or 34 Wh internal battery. All new systems are equipped with 11.6” FHD displays featuring gloved multi-touch, AG/AR/AS/polarizer and etched Gorilla Glass.

Meanwhile the communication capabilities of the Latitude 12 model 7212 are vast. By default, the rugged tablet has an Intel 8265 802.11ac Wi-Fi controller with Bluetooth 4.2, a Qualcomm Snapdragon X7 LTE modem as well as NFC capability. Optionally, the slates can be equipped with a GPS card, Bluetooth 4.2 can be removed and a different LTE modem installed.

Wired I/O features of the Latitude 7212 rugged extreme tablet include USB 3.1 Type-C connector that can be used for charging and external display connectivity, a USB 3.0 Type-A connector, an optional micro RS-232 port, a universal audio jack and so on. The system is also equipped with optional rear and front cameras, a contactless smart card reader as well as a touch fingerprint sensor. For backwards compatibility, the model 7212 also has a regular 4.5-mm power connector. Finally, an optional dock station adds batteries, GbE, two USB 3.0 Type-A ports, an HDMI connector, a D-Sub output, as well as two more RS-232 ports.

When it comes to security, Dell seems to have everything covered too. The system features a fingerprint reader, Dell’s ControlVault advanced authentication, Intel vPro remote management, a TPM 2.0 module, optional SED option for SSDs, NIST SP800-147 secure platform and so on.

Specifications of the Dell Latitude 12 Rugged Extreme Tablet
  Latitude 12 7212
LCD Diagonal 11.9"
Resolution 1920×1080
Features Outdoor-readable display with gloved multi-touch AG/AR/AS/Polarizer and Gorilla Glass
CPU Dual-Core 7th Gen Intel Core i5 CPUs (Skylake-U)
Dual-Core 7th Gen Intel Core i3/i5/i7 CPUs (Kaby Lake-U)
Graphics Intel HD Graphics 520/620 (24 EUs)
RAM 8 GB or 16 GB LPDDR3
Storage 128 GB SATA Class 20 SSD
256 GB SATA Class 20 SSD Opal 2.0 SED
256 GB SATA Class 20 SSD
256 GB PCIe NVMe Class 40 SSD Opal 2.0 SED
512 GB SATA Class 20 SSD Opal 2.0 SED
512 GB SATA Class 20 SSD
512 GB PCIe NVMe Class 40 SSD
1 TB SATA Class 20 SSD
1 TB PCIe NVMe Class 40 SSD
Wireless Wi-Fi, Bluetooth options Wireless LAN Options:
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265 with Bluetooth 4.2 + vPro Mobile broadband
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265 + No Bluetooth 4.2 Wireless Card
Qualcomm QCA61x4A 802.11ac Dual Band (2x2) Wireless Adapter+ Bluetooth 4.1
Mobile Broadband
(optional)
Qualcomm Snapdragon X7 LTE-A for Win 10 (DW5811e Gobi5000) for Worldwide (Windows 7 and 10 options)
Qualcomm Snapdragon X7 LTE-A for Win 10 (DW5811e Gobi5000) for AT&T (Windows 7 and 10 options)
Qualcomm Snapdragon X7 LTE-A for Win 10 (DW5811e Gobi5000) for Verizon (Windows 7 and 10 options)
Qualcomm Snapdragon X7 LTE-A for Win 10 (DW5811e Gobi5000) for Sprint (Windows 7 and 10 options)
Dell Wireless 5816e multi-mode Gobi 5000 4G LTE WAN Card (Japan/ANZ only)
GPS Dedicated u-blox NEO-M8 GPS card
Additional Dual RF-passthough (Wi-Fi and mobile broadband), Near field communication (NFC)
USB 3.1 1 × USB Type-C Gen 1
3.0 1 × USB 3.0 Type-A
Cameras Front Front-facing camera
Back Rear-facing camera with flash LED
Security TPM 2.0, ControlVault™ advanced authentication, Dell Security Tools, Dell Data Protection | Encryption,
Contactless SmartCard reader, optional fingerprint reader and SmartCard reader
Other I/O TRRS audio jack, micro RS-232 (optional), POGO, etc.
Battery 24 Wh or 26 Wh
Dimensions Width 312 mm | 12.3"
Depth 203 mm | 8"
Thickness 24 mm | 0.96"
Weight 1270 grams (tablet)
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit
Microsoft Windows 10 Pro with Windows 7 Professional Downgrade (64 bit) - Skylake CPU required
Regulatory and Environmental Compliance MIL-STD-810G Transit drop (48”/1.22m; single unit; 26 drops), operating drop (36”/0.91m), blowing
rain, blowing dust, blowing sand, vibration, functional shock, humidity, salt fog, altitude, explosive atmosphere,
thermal extremes, thermal shock, freeze/thaw, tactical standby to operational.
Operating thermal range -20°F to 145°F (-29°C to 63°C); Non-operating: -60°F to 160°F (-51°C to 71°C).
IEC 60529 ingress protection IP-65 (dust-tight, protected against pressurized water)
Hazardous locations ANSI/ISA.12.12.01 certification capable (Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C,D),
CAN/CSA C22.2
Electromagnetic interference MIL-STD-461F certified
Optional Accessories Dell Desktop Dock for the Rugged Tablet,
Dell Dock WD15,
Dell Power Companions,
Kickstand and Rugged RGB Backlit Keyboard cover,
Shoulder Strap,
Soft and Rigid Handle options,
Chest Harness,
Cross Strap, Active Pen,
Backpack Modules,
Dell 24” & 27” Monitors,
Dell Wireless Keyboard and Mouse
Price Starting at $1899

Dell’s Latitude 12 7212 will be available shortly starting at $1,899. Rugged tablet dock, keyboard cover with kickstand as well as rugged battery charger will be available separately.

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Source: Dell

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  • Chaitanya - Friday, September 08, 2017 - link

    That eye watering price though. Reply
  • quiksilvr - Friday, September 08, 2017 - link

    This is actually a great price. I remember when the Panasonic Toughbooks weren't nearly as rugged and cost over 2x this. And that had a HDD, not a SSD. Reply
  • IsabelRoberts - Friday, September 15, 2017 - link

    I resigned my office-job and now I am getting paid 93 dollar hourly. How? I work over internet! My old work was making me miserable, so I was forced to try something different, two years after...I can say my life is changed-completely for the betterr! Check it out what i do........ http://cutt.us/25Wd Reply
  • anactoraaron - Friday, September 08, 2017 - link

    Couldn't they have made this with the 8th gen with double the cores? Reply
  • DanNeely - Friday, September 08, 2017 - link

    In this particular case, it's almost certainly too soon. All the Mil-std testing adds a lot to the time between finalizing the design and being able to release it.

    More generally expect to see mundane laptops with G7 parts launching over the next few months because for whatever reason their timelines were delayed from a month or more ago to whenever they actually come out.
    Reply
  • HStewart - Friday, September 08, 2017 - link

    But Dell place the 8th Generation CPU in the XPS 13. But remember what this is aim at - they are looking for durability and reliability - 8th generation maybe too new for that - after all this product could be planning stages way before 8th generation.

    But the need for more cores is probably over rated - that is what they said about memory and desired for 64 bit. Of course having more cores is always nice, but currently that would be wrong at sake of suffer single core speed.
    Reply
  • DanNeely - Sunday, September 10, 2017 - link

    The XPS13 doesn't have months worth of engineering, testing, and validation for milspec drop/etc testing that would need completed before release. Reply
  • ImSpartacus - Friday, September 08, 2017 - link

    Time to market is probably the culprit.

    These kinds of devices are always "late" due to all of the testing necessary. So you can expect an update in 2018 with those processors.
    Reply
  • BrokenCrayons - Friday, September 08, 2017 - link

    That's a nice looking tablet. It looks like it requires active cooling which isn't a big deal considering Dell has been sealing off the cooling fan and heatsink from the rest of the system for a long time now, but with a SSD, it's soooo close to having no moving parts. Passive cooling would have been a nice addition, but maybe impractical given the TDP.

    I'd love to get my hands on one of these things, but my daily personal needs just wouldn't demand something like this when a phone in a cheap case and screen protector is enough. I could never justify the expense even though the price is reasonable considering the standards it has to meet.
    Reply
  • megadirk - Friday, September 08, 2017 - link

    I have no need for this but I still want one. Reply

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