One of the drawbacks of the GPUs built into the Clarkdale/Arrandales CPUs and the Sandy Bridge CPUs was the lack of 23.976 Hz for matching the source frame rate of many videos. Combined with the lack of reliable support for open source software, this has often pushed users to opt for a discrete HTPC GPU.

Ideally, a GPU should be capable of the following refresh rates at the minimum:

  1. 23.976 Hz
  2. 24 Hz
  3. 25 Hz
  4. 29.97 Hz
  5. 30 Hz
  6. 50 Hz
  7. 59.94 Hz
  8. 60 Hz

Some users demand integral multiples of 23.976 / 24 Hz because they result in a smoother desktop experience, while also making sure that the source and display refresh rates are still matched without repeated or dropped frames.

However, being in the US (NTSC land), we are looking at the minimum necessary subset here, namely, support for the following:

  1. 23.976 Hz for 23.976 fps source material
  2. 24 Hz for 24 fps source material
  3. 59.94 Hz for 59.94 fps source material

We have observed that the refresh rate is heavily dependent on the AV components in the setup (a card which provided perfect 23.976 Hz in my setup performed quite differently in another). In order to keep the conditions same for all the contenders, the custom refresh rates were tested with the HDMI output of the card connected to an Onkyo TX-SR606 and then onto a Toshiba Regza 37" 1080p TV. The Toshiba TV model is indeed capable of displaying 24p material.

GT 430:

The NVIDIA Control Panel provided a 23 Hz option by default when connected in the test setup. This is obviously coming from the EDID information. Setting the refresh rate to 23 Hz and playing back a 23.976 fps video resulted in the following:

Note that the playback frame rate locks on to 23.971 fps, and the display refresh rate also loosely locks on to 23.971 Hz. Unfortunately, this is only slightly better than the 24 Hz lock that Intel provides for the 23 Hz setting. With this, one can expect a dropped frame every 200 seconds.

Fortunately, NVIDIA provides us with a way to create custom resolutions using the NVIDIA Control Panel, as in the gallery below.

The display mode refresh rate should be set to 23 Hz, and the Timing parameters need to be tweaked manually (altering the refresh rate to change the pixel clock). This is more of a trial and error process (setting the refresh rate to 23.976 as in the gallery below didn't necessarily deliver the 23.976 frame lock and refresh rate during media playback). With a custom resolution setup, we are able to get the playback frame rate to lock at 23.976.

The display refresh rate oscillates a little around this value, but, in all probability, averages out over time. We do not see any dropped or repeated frames.

Moving on to the 24 Hz setting (needed for 24 fps files, common in a lot of European Blu-rays), we find that it works without the need for much tweaking.

Playback locks at 24 fps, and the refresh rate oscillates around this value with very little deviation.

The default NTSC refresh rate (59.94 Hz) works in a manner similar to the 24 Hz setting, as is evident in the gallery below.

MSI GT 520:

With respect to custom refresh rates, the GT 520 is very similar to the GT 430. The 23 Hz setting, at default, had the same issues as the GT 430, but nothing that a little tweaking didn't fix. The gallery below shows the behavior with the default 23 Hz setting:

After setting up a custom resolution, we get the following: