Corsair CX430 V2 430W Measurements

Voltage Regulation

+3.3V Regulation/Ripple and Noise
Load Voltage
5% 3.29 V (3mV)
10% 3.27 V (3mV)
20% 3.27 V (4mV)
50% 3.25 V (5mV)
80% 3.25 V (6mV)
100% 3.22 V (7mV)
110% 3.20 V (13mV)
Crossload +12V max. -1.52%
Crossload +3.3V/+5V max. -3.64%

 

+5V Regulation/Ripple and Noise
Load Voltage
5% 5.10 V (4mV)
10% 5.10 V (6mV)
20% 4.99 V (5mV)
50% 4.97 V (5mV)
80% 4.96 V (7mV)
100% 4.95 V (7mV)
110% 4.92 V (8mV)
Crossload +12V max. -0.60%
Crossload +3.3V/+5V max. -5.80%

 

+12V Regulation (Worst Ouput)/Ripple and Noise (Worst Output)
Load Voltage
5% 12.01 V (8mV)
10% 11.98 V (9mV)
20% 11.98 V (10mV)
50% 11.95 V (12mV)
80% 11.92 V (15mV)
100% 11.89 V (18mV)
110% 11.88 V (22mV)
Crossload +12V max. -3.50%
Crossload +3.3V/+5V max. -0.25%

Noise Levels

Sound Pressure Level (Ambient: 16dBA, 1m distance) and Temperatures (Δϑ to 23.4 °C ambient temperature)
Load Opinion
5% 17 dBA (1.0°C)
10% 17 dBA (1.9 °C)
20% 18 dBA (3.9 °C)
50% 22 dBA (6.4 °C)
80% 25 dBA (9.1 °C)
100% 27 dBA (10.5 °C)
110% 27 dBA (11.4 °C)

Efficiency and PFC

Efficiency and Power Factor 115 VAC
Load Efficiency PFC
5% 69.48% 0.810
10% 73.90% 0.919
20% 81.64% 0.927
50% 83.29% 0.951
80% 82.88% 0.968
100% 82.05% 0.974
110% 81.71% 0.981

 

Efficiency and Power Factor 230 VAC
Load Efficiency PFC
5% 69.97% 0.795
10% 75.12% 0.890
20% 82.15% 0.902
50% 84.90% 0.931
80% 83.79% 0.961
100% 82.90% 0.971
110% 82.43% 0.975

The sound pressure level and found out, that this PSU has a good fan speed regulation. The RPMs are tolerable up to 50-80% load. Beyond that point, this PSU is no longer silent, but still quiet enough. Note the difference the power grid makes in terms of efficiency. 115VAC means higher current and more stress for all power supplies, while 230VAC shows a worse power factor at all loads. Nevertheless, 0.975 PFC is still good and most users will find 83% efficiency more than sufficient. All the rails fall clearly within ATX specifications.

Corsair CX430 V2 430W -1 FSP OEM 400W APN (230V version) and GHN -1
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  • pvdw - Wednesday, July 04, 2012 - link

    BTW, though I really enjoy most Anandtech articles, your PSU ones can't beat SilentPCReview. But then I can't see how you could do better without an anechoic chamber

    Check out their list of recommended supplies:
    http://www.silentpcreview.com/Recommended_PSUs
    Reply
  • A5 - Wednesday, July 04, 2012 - link

    The cheapest PSU on that list is well over $100, which is more than double the most expensive one in this article, which is about finding a good "cheap" PSU.

    I'm glad AT did this article as it should encourage a little more competition in the low-end space.
    Reply
  • knutjb - Wednesday, July 04, 2012 - link

    In my experience I've had a couple low end PSUs do bad things to MBs even though they were modestly loaded. After using a number of different manufacturers all I buy are Seasonics. I get them when they are on sale.

    I have a 9 yr old 600 S-12? on its second system and the output measures the same as it did when new. Blow out the dust occasionally and it just works. Even in low end systems I don't trust inexpensive PSUs, their quality control is all but non-existent with wide variation in samples.

    You get what you pay for and I don't like buying things twice.
    Reply
  • pvdw - Thursday, July 05, 2012 - link

    A quick search turns up this link:

    http://www.amazon.com/Seasonic-ATX12V-S12II-430-BR...

    The Seasonic S12II 430 for $60 shipped. Or the 380W for $54 shipped.
    Reply
  • clarkn0va - Friday, July 06, 2012 - link

    Seasonic SS-350ET

    Supposedly not as quiet as their retail offerings, but always inexpensive. I would like to see how this one holds up against similar offerings.

    Maybe AT needs a Bench section for PSUs?
    Reply
  • Belard - Wednesday, July 04, 2012 - link

    I've bought some CX models for bottom end PCs for clients...

    But I picked up two 500w models, both were defective.

    1) Defective power connector (at the motherboard)...

    2) Flutter fan noises.

    Returned them, bought Thermaltake TR2s.
    Reply
  • piroroadkill - Wednesday, July 04, 2012 - link

    When the Corsairs first hit the scene, the HX series were all Seasonic.

    Corsair is a nice rebrander, but I go straight to Seasonic for my own system's PSU these days. I have a Seasonic X-660..
    Reply
  • Arnulf - Wednesday, July 04, 2012 - link

    Great article !

    I wish you could round up even more models and/or present the results in a common bench-like database (you know, like the CPU comparison etc.) where different models coudl be added over time.
    Reply
  • silverblue - Wednesday, July 04, 2012 - link

    Enermax NAXN ENP450AWT-B 450W - £60 at Scan:

    http://www.scan.co.uk/products/450w-enermax-naxn-8...
    (Unfortunately, out of stock)

    Rasurbo RAP350 350W - £44 inc. delivery on eBay:
    http://compare.ebay.co.uk/like/280832584568?var=lv...

    The 450W variant - £58 inc. delivery on eBay:
    http://compare.ebay.co.uk/like/280758645995?var=lv...

    Corsair CX430 V2 430W - from £35 inc. delivery:
    http://www.google.co.uk/products/catalog?q=Corsair...

    You can find FSP Hexa, Aurum and Fortron PSUs quite easily; the Aurum 80 PLUS Gold 500W is £62 inc. delivery.
    Reply
  • Phaedrus2129 - Thursday, July 05, 2012 - link

    That Sinan PSU is likely made by LongYi, a small and crappy PSU manufacturer in Guangdong, China. They make knock-off, cost-down designs based on reverse-engineered FSP and similar PSUs. Reply

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