Performance

Well let’s just say that Froyo is really fast, at least on paper. The new JIT compiler for the Dalvik VM is about 2-5x faster than the one used in Éclair (v2.1) and CPU intensive code is executed much more efficiently. Memory management has also been improved and multitasking seems snappier. Basically, Froyo will not make your device run obscenely faster than before, but it will speed things up to the point where you’ll definitely notice a difference. That being said, Froyo still lacks the overall smoothness and responsiveness of Apple's iOS. It still suffers from sporadic stuttering and choppy scrolling. Animations are generally smooth, but are still prone to occasional slowdowns (something that Apple has actually introduced with iOS4). The issue is acutely exacerbated while using Live Wallpapers; that’s when phone feels really sluggish.

Froyo Performance Tests
Android Revision Linpack (MFLOPS) BenchmarkPi (ms - lower is better) SunSpider (ms - lower is better)
Nexus One (Android 2.2) 36.864 1165 5702
Nexus One (Android 2.1) 6.994 2820 14564

In terms of raw numbers, Froyo’s performance is hard to beat. The numbers speak for themselves; the Linpack benchmark shows a whopping 427% improvement from v2.1, while the BenchmarkPi and Sunspider tests post approximately a 140 - 150% boost in performance. Looks like the JIT compiler packs some serious under-the-hood optimizations. However, under normal usage scenarios, the performance delta isn’t as noticeable as the numbers lead us to believe. While things are quite snappy overall, don’t expect your phone to boot in 10 seconds.

Flash 10.1, Tethering & Hotspot Support Final Words
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  • Zirconium - Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - link

    Nope, dguy6789 is right. If it takes you 10 seconds to complete something that only takes me 5, then I am 100% faster than you, not 50%. Think of it like this: you and I are running a race (in this case, Android 2.1 and 2.2 are racing to complete a task). If I finish in half the time as you, then I am running twice as fast, or 100% faster. According to the numbers posted, Android 2.2 is about 140% faster on BenchmarkPi and 155% faster on SunSpider.

    Is it just me, or is it sad that I have to explain basic math on a tech site?
    Reply
  • Saumitra - Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - link

    That's right, I just saw the spreadsheet I had with the numbers and noticed an error in the formula! Let me update that ASAP! Reply
  • hughlle - Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - link

    haha, i'm just tired and confused. i'm sat here thinking that if something is 100% faster, that it is not though a 100% performance increase. just ignore me today haha Reply
  • cleric7x9 - Thursday, June 24, 2010 - link

    Actually, since you are using the word "faster" as a qualifier, you begin with the slower (higher) value. Therefore, 5, in relation to 10, is 50% slower, or in other words, 100% faster.

    Is it just me, or is it sad that I have to explain basic math on a tech site?
    Reply
  • djc263 - Thursday, June 24, 2010 - link

    Actually you aren't using math skills anymore. English language skills interpret objects and comparative language. You admitted the math skills were correct, while disagreeing that he had identified the object of the comparative phrase. Reply
  • ekerazha - Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - link

    The fact that Android lacks WPA-Enterprise support (auth through certificates) and a decent proxy support, makes it unusable with "advanced" network infrastructures therefore useless for many people. Reply
  • Death666Angel - Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - link

    http://pboos.ch/wordpress/2009/04/android-using-wp...
    Requires some work, but there you go. :)
    Reply
  • ekerazha - Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - link

    It's hackish and the phone must be rooted, so it's not an acceptable solution. Reply
  • fepple - Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - link

    I thought the Nexus one update was official? I remember seeing links to the ROM on a google.com domain? Also I thought I saw instructions for installing it with the standard (locked) boot loader?

    One thing I've noticed is my GPS seems to pick up a signal way when I turn it on than 2.1. Also I grabbed a radio update at the same time, which gives me loads better 3G - but I think thats cause I put a crappy update on before :)
    Reply
  • Spoelie - Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - link

    I'm not convinced it was the best choice to standardize on "black text on white background". This makes sense if most devices are TFT with poor blacks, poor viewing angles, high brightness and constant power consumption - but aren't most new devices AMOLED? On those screens, a white screen consumes a lot more power than a black screen, and you don't have any contrast problems. It would make sense to invert the colors on those devices. Why not make it switchable?

    Or a make it switchable?
    Reply

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