As part of today's announcements at I/O 2015, Google announced a new operating system and API targeted at the Internet-of-Things (IoT) space.

Starting off with the new OS, under the codename of Project Brillo, Google promises a very stripped down Android-derivative operating system. Google explains that it keeps the lower-level components of Android such as the specific Linux kernel modifications and hardware abstraction layers. Device, and most importantly SoC manufacturers can reuse and continue basing their software stacks on the Android frameworks that have been standardized in the mobile space. Project Brillo is meant to offer a versatile OS with minimal system requirements for IoT devices such as for example your thermostat or light switch.

To make use and interconnect the IoT ecosystem, Google also announces WEAVE, which is an API framework meant to standardize communications between all these devices. We still don't have much technical information yet, but from code-snippets given in the presentation it looks like a straightforward simple and descriptive syntax standard in JSON format. WEAVE is a platform-agnostic API that can be implemented by any vendor and developer if they wish to do so.

Google plans to release the developer preview of Project Brillo in Q3 while the WEAVE API standard is supposed to see its publication in Q4 later in the year.

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  • sundragon - Thursday, May 28, 2015 - link

    Great, like most devices with Lollipop (Vista for your phone), your oven and thermostat can lag when doing the simplest of things...

    I understand expanding into other areas, but how about fixing what's broken and doing a few things (that you know) really well??
    Reply
  • loki1725 - Friday, May 29, 2015 - link

    Dang, I saw Google and Weave together, and thought Google Wave was coming back. I miss my Waves... Reply
  • bug77 - Friday, May 29, 2015 - link

    It seems very strange they went for JSON instead of a binary representation, like BSON, which is inherently more efficient. Reply
  • Andrei Frumusanu - Friday, May 29, 2015 - link

    I think you're mixing up formats. If you're referring to BSON as used in databases then that is used purely for *storage* efficiency advantages for large JSON datasets. JSON remains the de-facto standard for web and increasingly other use-cases where a simple mark-up-language is needed. Reply
  • sor - Friday, May 29, 2015 - link

    I assume he was thinking that BSON is easier to handle for tiny 8 bit microcontrollers, and makes for smaller messages that are more reliably transferred over low power wireless. In playing with 2.4 GHz radios on Arduino I've found that I can double my range by decreasing my message payload from 32 bytes to 16. Nicely formatted strings are easy for humans to use, but come with some overhead in compute. Reply
  • Murloc - Friday, May 29, 2015 - link

    Brillo in italian means tipsy/buzzed. Reply

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