PC Power & Cooling Turbo Cool 1200W


PC Power & Cooling sent us their brand new model of the Turbo Cool series rated to deliver 1200W. With its length of 23.1cm (9.1") it is definitely one of the longest power supplies we have seen so far. Obviously, these high capacity power supplies are intended for full tower cases, but whatever case you choose make sure there is ample room for an oversize PSU before spending hundreds of dollars. The Turbo Cool 1200W is cooled by an 80mm fan located at the front of the case. Our readers will probably remember our last encounter with PC Power & Cooling which was very loud indeed, and careful readers will have already discovered the small Delta logo printed on the fan on the picture above. The Delta logo means we will not have any surprises while testing; it's a three-blade fan and we expect noise levels to once again be quite high.


90A on the 12V rails is quite impressive and indeed it is quite hard to get this PSU on its limits with a normal system. The power supply comes in a PCP&C specific box and is protected by several layers of carton paper. There are not many accessories inside of the box since PCP&C has no need to attach little goodies like a lanyard etc. The power supply itself is black.

Cables and Connectors



When it comes down to the cables we found a whole lot of them. Being a high performing power supply you need to have a lot of options for connecting enough hardware to fully use your PSU. While there are not as many SATA and Molex connectors attached as with the Tagan ITZ 1300W we'll see later in this article, we can see that PCP&C wanted to go a different direction in the first place. There are three 6-pin and three 6/8-pin PEG connectors attached, which gives the ability to power up even the meanest graphics card collection. AMD's TriFire has been sighted in the wild a few times, so if/when such systems begin shipping PSUs with 3/3 6-pin/8-pin PEG connections will be useful. (We'll wait and see what TriFire actually offers before rendering any verdict, of course.) In addition the Turbo Cool has two 8-pin EPS connectors for use with high-end enthusiast and workstation motherboards.


With "just" six SATA and eight Molex connectors the Turbo Cool is slightly under-equipped in the area of drive support, and there is certainly space for a few more of these connectors. A minimum length of 60cm for the main connectors is generally sufficient to reach the necessary areas in most full-tower cases. The maximum length of 115cm for SATA connectors is also very good. All the cables are nicely sleeved and the PEG connectors have white cables under their black sleeve which looks very cool. The ATX and EPS connectors are white in order to distinguish them from the other connectors.


The inside view brings us a totally different approach to higher wattage than we will see in the other power supplies of this roundup. The top view is unfortunately obstructed by the various internal components, but in essence this power supply has two smaller power supplies inside. There's a shared filtering stage at the entrance in the top-left corner and upper edge of the PCB. Starting at the upper heat sink of the three horizontal heat sinks we have two vertically arranged PCBs that extend from the top-left to the bottom-right of the PSU.

Each of the PCBs has its own PFC stage and transformer and is able to deliver two 12V rails up to a load of 50A each. All other rails are then taken from the 12V rails. This is done on the small sister PCB located on the lower left side in the above picture. This kind of topology is surely a new way of doing things - we haven't seen anything like this before. However, the overall efficiency should be lowered with this approach since there is a higher loss from the voltage regulation.

There are several kinds of capacitors used by PCP&C. The two primary parts have a Hitachi cap rated at 390µF and 450V, and besides normal electrolyte caps we also have some "solid" caps which we have previously talked about in the Seasonic S12II review (as well as in motherboard reviews). An interesting side note is that a happy competitor told us that there are several severe problems with these kinds of caps such as EMI (Electromagnetic Interference). In October we will be in Taiwan for a visit to several companies, and FSP is on the list. From former visits we know that FSP has proper test equipment to measure EMI and we will definitely attempt to get evidence either for or against this accusation.

In comparison with other design layouts we can definitely say that PCP&C has a completely different approach with this design. Most of the space inside of the power supply is used by the two main PCBs, leaving little space for bigger heat sinks. All the remaining space is taken by the small, flat heat sinks - heat sinks which get very hot during use, particularly at higher loads. The biggest disadvantage is the lack of a proper airflow through the chassis. There are components and even small PCBs that protrude from the various surfaces and block airflow - not just a little but completely. It's for this reason that there is such a powerful fan installed, which is capable of sucking large quantities of air out of the PSU. Despite our concerns with the design, however, PCP&C does have a reputation of providing very high quality PSUs, and they provide a seven year warranty on the Turbo Cool 1200W which isn't offered without purpose.
Index PCP&C 1200W Loads
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  • alilxmas - Sunday, May 10, 2009 - link

    At the end the reviewer had no personal preference, kinda left it off in mid sentence there... at least to me.

    Anyway some people do have to get the latest and do need a i7 CPU, multiple GPU's, slight OC, 6 hard drives, 3 monitors, etc.

    Heres some things I do besides gaming,
    Encoding videos from about 6-8 hours a day recorded footage sent from people who drop off anything from their safari trip to a wedding converted to dvd, formatted for their DSi or i-touch.

    Processing RAW files (about 20mb per pic)
    3-D Animation and models


    Also for the air problem a slight mod can fix almost anything.

    Reply
  • alilxmas - Sunday, May 10, 2009 - link

    At the end the reviewer had no personal preference, kinda left it off in mid sentence there... at least to me.

    Anyway some people do have to get the latest and do need a i7 CPU, multiple GPU's, slight OC, 6 hard drives, 3 monitors, etc.

    Heres some things I do besides gaming,
    Encoding videos from about 6-8 hours a day recorded footage sent from people who drop off anything from their safari trip to converted to dvd, formatted for their DSi or i-touch.

    Processing RAW files
    3-D Animation and models


    Also for the air problem a slight mod can fix almost anything.

    Reply
  • Christoph Katzer - Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - link

    Housten: We have Ripple, please confirm we have Ripple... the world makes sense again! Reply
  • TheOtherRizzo - Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - link

    The efficiency graphs don't start before 20%. 20% is 250W. That's a lot more than an average computer uses on idle. So the tests don't tell me what these "Hi end" PSU's will do to my power bill and heat/noise output. Reply
  • strikeback03 - Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - link

    The "average computer" also does not need a 1200W+ PSU. Look at Jarred's power usage numbers from the Blackbird test (linked above) - used 370W at idle and 740 at load. Reply
  • Fallen Kell - Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - link

    The power cord connection on the Cooler Master Real Power Pro is NOT proprietary! That is a standard IEC-320-C19/C20 power connector. It is typically used for high power draw situations, (i.e. like 208V 20amp circuits, not your standard home 110V 15amp). This is actually a good thing for use in this situation. At full load, and the 80% efficiency associated with it, this power supply will need 14amps on your standard 110V outlet. That is not something your standard home wiring and sockets are designed to do. Many will only be rated for 10-12 amps per socket, 15amps for the entire circuit! By using a different connector like this, it will force people to use the appropriate rated wire and sockets, because this beast will draw more power then that basic home wiring can dish out without melting down and becoming a fire hazard. Reply
  • strikeback03 - Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - link

    Didn't mention if the wall connector is different. However using the different connector at the PSU will make it harder to use an inadequate power cable from wall to PSU. The Infiniti 650W PSUs we used in a few recent builds had larger-than-normal power cords, I would imagine a 1200W PSU needs a cable that is larger yet. Reply
  • JarredWalton - Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - link

    Ummm... the socket on the back of the PSU is different. The main connector on the other end is still standard, AFAIK. Reply
  • Bozo Galora - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    heres another review of the same PCP&C PSU
    http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=458&type=...">http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=458&type=...
    here he gives volatges given at both at PSU and at ATX connector with a discussion about it.

    No other in depth PSU reviews show the lowering degree of V with load that yours consistently do for some reason.
    Reply
  • Christoph Katzer - Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - link

    Just have a look at the loading diagram, I am testing strictly according to Intel specs and have ~20A on 3.3 and ~24A on 5V. There I see only ~16-17 amps on both. That the voltage regulation works better with less load should be quite clear. Compare the loads and not only voltage. Reply

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