Ultra High-End PSU Roundup

by Christoph Katzer on 10/22/2007 6:00 AM EST
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  • alilxmas - Sunday, May 10, 2009 - link

    At the end the reviewer had no personal preference, kinda left it off in mid sentence there... at least to me.

    Anyway some people do have to get the latest and do need a i7 CPU, multiple GPU's, slight OC, 6 hard drives, 3 monitors, etc.

    Heres some things I do besides gaming,
    Encoding videos from about 6-8 hours a day recorded footage sent from people who drop off anything from their safari trip to a wedding converted to dvd, formatted for their DSi or i-touch.

    Processing RAW files (about 20mb per pic)
    3-D Animation and models


    Also for the air problem a slight mod can fix almost anything.

    Reply
  • alilxmas - Sunday, May 10, 2009 - link

    At the end the reviewer had no personal preference, kinda left it off in mid sentence there... at least to me.

    Anyway some people do have to get the latest and do need a i7 CPU, multiple GPU's, slight OC, 6 hard drives, 3 monitors, etc.

    Heres some things I do besides gaming,
    Encoding videos from about 6-8 hours a day recorded footage sent from people who drop off anything from their safari trip to converted to dvd, formatted for their DSi or i-touch.

    Processing RAW files
    3-D Animation and models


    Also for the air problem a slight mod can fix almost anything.

    Reply
  • Christoph Katzer - Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - link

    Housten: We have Ripple, please confirm we have Ripple... the world makes sense again! Reply
  • TheOtherRizzo - Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - link

    The efficiency graphs don't start before 20%. 20% is 250W. That's a lot more than an average computer uses on idle. So the tests don't tell me what these "Hi end" PSU's will do to my power bill and heat/noise output. Reply
  • strikeback03 - Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - link

    The "average computer" also does not need a 1200W+ PSU. Look at Jarred's power usage numbers from the Blackbird test (linked above) - used 370W at idle and 740 at load. Reply
  • Fallen Kell - Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - link

    The power cord connection on the Cooler Master Real Power Pro is NOT proprietary! That is a standard IEC-320-C19/C20 power connector. It is typically used for high power draw situations, (i.e. like 208V 20amp circuits, not your standard home 110V 15amp). This is actually a good thing for use in this situation. At full load, and the 80% efficiency associated with it, this power supply will need 14amps on your standard 110V outlet. That is not something your standard home wiring and sockets are designed to do. Many will only be rated for 10-12 amps per socket, 15amps for the entire circuit! By using a different connector like this, it will force people to use the appropriate rated wire and sockets, because this beast will draw more power then that basic home wiring can dish out without melting down and becoming a fire hazard. Reply
  • strikeback03 - Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - link

    Didn't mention if the wall connector is different. However using the different connector at the PSU will make it harder to use an inadequate power cable from wall to PSU. The Infiniti 650W PSUs we used in a few recent builds had larger-than-normal power cords, I would imagine a 1200W PSU needs a cable that is larger yet. Reply
  • JarredWalton - Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - link

    Ummm... the socket on the back of the PSU is different. The main connector on the other end is still standard, AFAIK. Reply
  • Bozo Galora - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    heres another review of the same PCP&C PSU
    http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=458&type=...">http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=458&type=...
    here he gives volatges given at both at PSU and at ATX connector with a discussion about it.

    No other in depth PSU reviews show the lowering degree of V with load that yours consistently do for some reason.
    Reply
  • Christoph Katzer - Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - link

    Just have a look at the loading diagram, I am testing strictly according to Intel specs and have ~20A on 3.3 and ~24A on 5V. There I see only ~16-17 amps on both. That the voltage regulation works better with less load should be quite clear. Compare the loads and not only voltage. Reply
  • EatSpam - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    PC Power and Cooling will do a custom wiring harness for you, so if you need a different connector configuration, they'll do it for a small fee. Reply
  • NicePants42 - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    I understand that most machines don't need anywhere near this much power, but those acoustic graphs are important. There aren't many 500-600W PSUs that will remain quiet at 100% load.

    For my last build, I got the CM Real Power Pro 1000 Watt PSU for $179 after $50 MIR - a far cry from the usual ~$350 price range for 1000W+ PSUs. While I may not use all of the power capacity, I do get very high efficiency and zero noise at an (estimated) 500W load, and the PSU will last that much longer because it's not running at 100% capacity.

    After 6 months with the PCP&C 'Silencer' 750 (which cost $200, btw), this 'overkill' PSU is a welcome change, and definitely worth $179.

    For those interested, I think svc.com is now offering a $50 MIR, although I got mine from ZZF.
    Reply
  • EatSpam - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    I can't imagine needing this much power. My server is running a lowly Silencer 610 and has 2 Clovertowns, 12gb of FBDIMMs, and 16 HDs. No problems at all. Reply
  • flipmode - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    1300w PSUs - for the folks that drive tandem dump trucks to get their groceries. Reply
  • AssBall - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    NEXT UP!
    AT does a review of a mental facility and finds that in fact, 95% of the patients are actually retarded!

    ........
    Reply
  • magreen - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    That was so random I couldn't stop laughing... Reply
  • sprockkets - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    quote:

    During our first round of testing our temperature probe broke and we saw more than 1000°C on our thermometer.


    Not quite sure if it was that high, perhaps 100c? If it was 1000c I would be worried :)
    Reply
  • Christoph Katzer - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    Actually is was way over 1k. I just attached new cables and it was running well again. Sorry by the way for not including these ripple tests. There is one prob after another. I actually don't have internet since 5 weeks now which is why there was no review last month. The e-scope function needs an IP address and this is provived by the router from the ISP. This company has just the lamest service I've seen in my life and doesn't seem to have the need to send a new box. Reply
  • jenli - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    I am curious if two lower wattage PSU ganged
    together would be cheaper, quieter, and more
    robust ?
    Reply
  • eetnoyer - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    So when do we see the budget power supply roundup that you suggested when you started this project? You know, the stuff that the other 96% of your readers care about. Reply
  • redly1 - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    I'm just trying to imagine the flames that ensue when something goes bad on the motherboard.

    Anyone ever burn up a classic Athlon by forgetting to put the heatsink on? Imagine doing that with a 1.3kW supply? Yikes
    Reply
  • billa16 - Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - link

    I did that on a k7@950. I was trying to oc it(hardmod with a pencil). Nothing happend the first 2 times(just a few secs). After that it's stopped working. No sparks/flames and stuff like that. Don't belive anything U read/see on the internet.
    This type of power supply's have protections. If something is damaged so bad that would cause flames the protection kicks in. The worst fire scenario with this type of PSU will be a flash when the fuse burns out.
    Sorry for my poor english.
    Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    Still amazes me how many people fall for the marketing hype... Reply
  • Traciatim - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    Instead of just giving specs and doing an overview of the efficiency, why not design a machine that actually needs these over say a 600-700Watt PSU and show watt you would need to do do actually use one of these.

    I have a pretty small machine, and it regularly pulls 120Watts out of the wall, 200Watts if I Get everything ramped up. I'm also using a P4, not a Core2Duo so it's not going to be as efficient.

    The ONLY point that I can see to have one of these is simply to waste money on uneeded equipment that could be better spent one something performance based and to say that 'My PSU is bigger than your PSU'.
    Reply
  • retrospooty - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    Ya, these 1000+ watt PSU's are marketed to enthusiests, and are supposed to be for heavily overclocked quad core CPU's (meaning cascade, dry ICE or liquid nitrogen cooling kind of overclocks) with overclocked high end SLI or crossfire rigs, and plenty of hard drives and other peripherals added as well. We are talking $3000 or higher systems - WAY overkill probably even for that purpose. Reply
  • JarredWalton - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    You can see the most power-hungry system I've personally tested http://www.anandtech.com/systems/showdoc.aspx?i=30...">right here - which uses standard ATX components and a Topower PSU. That's a lot more system than most people run, obviously, but if maximum efficiency is achieved in the 40-80% load range, and if that particular PSU was around 80% efficient, it was outputting around 600W of power at maximum load.

    Toss in TriFire HD 2900 XT and you could add another 100W to that, maybe. If you were to get an overclocked Xeon platform with dual quad-core CPUs plus CrossFire/TriFire, you could actually reach the point where 1300W was "required". LOL

    ORB chasers and "professional benchmarkers" running at insane overclocks (i.e. 5000 MHz quad-core) deal with exponential power requirement increases as well. The solution is either to use multiple PSUs or else get one of these uber-powerful designs. So these appear to be for around 0.01% of the market, I guess?
    Reply
  • Michael91ah - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    Glad to see the statistics for these 3 units. I really like the Cooler Master's curve on the acoustics. That noise makes a big difference for me when choosing a power supply. Reply

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