PCP&C 1200W Loads

PCP&C Turbo Cool 1200W Load Values
PSU Load 3.3V 5V 12V1 Wattage
All Rails
10% 1.77A 2.21A 8.45A 122W
20% 3.54A 4.42A 16.90A 243W
50% 8.85A 11.06A 42.25A 596W
80% 14.16A 17.70A 67.61A 935W
100% 17.70A 22.12A 84.51A 1150W
110% 19.47A 24.33A 92.96A 1255W

DC Outputs




At the DC outputs we see the normal drop with increasing load. Outputs stay within a 1% deviation up to 600W. With increasing loads the output is still within 3% of the target value, and we only see it slowly falling out of spec at the applied overload.

Ripple & Noise Results







The 12V rail showed not more than 12mV which is a very sweet result.
PCP&C 1200W PCP&C 1200W Performance Characteristics
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  • alilxmas - Sunday, May 10, 2009 - link

    At the end the reviewer had no personal preference, kinda left it off in mid sentence there... at least to me.

    Anyway some people do have to get the latest and do need a i7 CPU, multiple GPU's, slight OC, 6 hard drives, 3 monitors, etc.

    Heres some things I do besides gaming,
    Encoding videos from about 6-8 hours a day recorded footage sent from people who drop off anything from their safari trip to a wedding converted to dvd, formatted for their DSi or i-touch.

    Processing RAW files (about 20mb per pic)
    3-D Animation and models


    Also for the air problem a slight mod can fix almost anything.

    Reply
  • alilxmas - Sunday, May 10, 2009 - link

    At the end the reviewer had no personal preference, kinda left it off in mid sentence there... at least to me.

    Anyway some people do have to get the latest and do need a i7 CPU, multiple GPU's, slight OC, 6 hard drives, 3 monitors, etc.

    Heres some things I do besides gaming,
    Encoding videos from about 6-8 hours a day recorded footage sent from people who drop off anything from their safari trip to converted to dvd, formatted for their DSi or i-touch.

    Processing RAW files
    3-D Animation and models


    Also for the air problem a slight mod can fix almost anything.

    Reply
  • Christoph Katzer - Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - link

    Housten: We have Ripple, please confirm we have Ripple... the world makes sense again! Reply
  • TheOtherRizzo - Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - link

    The efficiency graphs don't start before 20%. 20% is 250W. That's a lot more than an average computer uses on idle. So the tests don't tell me what these "Hi end" PSU's will do to my power bill and heat/noise output. Reply
  • strikeback03 - Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - link

    The "average computer" also does not need a 1200W+ PSU. Look at Jarred's power usage numbers from the Blackbird test (linked above) - used 370W at idle and 740 at load. Reply
  • Fallen Kell - Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - link

    The power cord connection on the Cooler Master Real Power Pro is NOT proprietary! That is a standard IEC-320-C19/C20 power connector. It is typically used for high power draw situations, (i.e. like 208V 20amp circuits, not your standard home 110V 15amp). This is actually a good thing for use in this situation. At full load, and the 80% efficiency associated with it, this power supply will need 14amps on your standard 110V outlet. That is not something your standard home wiring and sockets are designed to do. Many will only be rated for 10-12 amps per socket, 15amps for the entire circuit! By using a different connector like this, it will force people to use the appropriate rated wire and sockets, because this beast will draw more power then that basic home wiring can dish out without melting down and becoming a fire hazard. Reply
  • strikeback03 - Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - link

    Didn't mention if the wall connector is different. However using the different connector at the PSU will make it harder to use an inadequate power cable from wall to PSU. The Infiniti 650W PSUs we used in a few recent builds had larger-than-normal power cords, I would imagine a 1200W PSU needs a cable that is larger yet. Reply
  • JarredWalton - Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - link

    Ummm... the socket on the back of the PSU is different. The main connector on the other end is still standard, AFAIK. Reply
  • Bozo Galora - Monday, October 22, 2007 - link

    heres another review of the same PCP&C PSU
    http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=458&type=...">http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=458&type=...
    here he gives volatges given at both at PSU and at ATX connector with a discussion about it.

    No other in depth PSU reviews show the lowering degree of V with load that yours consistently do for some reason.
    Reply
  • Christoph Katzer - Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - link

    Just have a look at the loading diagram, I am testing strictly according to Intel specs and have ~20A on 3.3 and ~24A on 5V. There I see only ~16-17 amps on both. That the voltage regulation works better with less load should be quite clear. Compare the loads and not only voltage. Reply

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