Speakerphone

The Note 2 puts its speakerphone in the same place as the original Galaxy Note, and thanks to the large size of the handset I bet there’s plenty of space for a big driver. The Note 2 also includes a new boost mode I didn’t see on Galaxy S 3 before that boosts speakerphone output volume considerably.

Speakerphone Volume - 3 inches Away

The tradeoff is that there is significantly more saturation and clipping with this mode toggled, but it is very, very loud.

Noise Suppression

Samsung has continually included Audience earSmart processors in its handsets for noise rejection and filtering, and the Note 2 is no exception. Both the original Note, and Note 2 include the Audience eS305 voice processor, though the Note 2 includes newer firmware thanks to its later release date. I’m told that both the Note and Note 2 were interesting challenges due to the extreme size of the handset and just how far apart the microphone pair is — there’s one at the very top, one at the very bottom on both models. In addition the T-Mobile Note 2 also has wideband AMR enabled (AMR-WB), which I confirmed inside ServiceMode by poking around. I called between two T-Mobile devices (the Note 2 and my own HTC One S) but it appears as though T-Mobile is still using AMR-NB over UMTS at least as evidenced by the 4 kHz maximum in the below spectral view. Either that or my HTC One S is the limiting factor.

Samsung is unique in that it gives a nice easy way to enable and disable the noise rejection paths by tapping the menu button, so we can easily test with it on and off just to see how much difference it makes. I’ve been supplied an industry standard babble track that emulates a loud cafe or restaurant, complete with a din of voices, doors opening and closing, and background bustle. I’ve found that playing this on loop in my office when I want that cafe vibe mitigates the desire to go and pay exorbitant amounts of money for the luxury of distraction, but I digress.

Galaxy Note 2 - Noise Rejection Enabled by AnandTech


Galaxy Note 2 - Noise Reduction Off by AnandTech

Anyhow I went ahead and tested the Note 2 with the babble track at a very loud maximum loudness of 94 dBA which is likely above spec, but a worst case. You can hear a dramatic difference between the Note 2 with the noise rejection turned on and off. I’ve heard eS305 do even better at rejecting literally all noise on the Xolo X900, but this is our first time using the babble track as opposed to music so my mental comparison isn’t quite fleshed out.

Cellular Connectivity, WiFi, GNSS Conclusions
POST A COMMENT

131 Comments

View All Comments

  • Zoomer - Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - link

    Google play music actually seems to do burst caching. Reply
  • Peanutsrevenge - Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - link

    Agreed.
    I listen to the cricket on tunein radio when it's on and that's a constant stream I believe and it annihilates my battery, despite the low bitrate.

    Would be nice if somewhere along the line radios could go into a low power mode where it's only running close to the minimum required speed with the power taking a relative drop.
    Reply
  • tommo123 - Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - link

    and haven't got the thing below 30% in battery life yet, even after using bluetooth audio for a few hours and tracking my location with endomondo, watching movies via 3G (didn't go for the LTE ver here - no point) and so on.

    got my USB OTG adapter today and am seeing how long i can play movies off of it for. max brightness and playing off an SD card connected externally.

    the screen on this thing is amazing and now my SGS2 is tiny, like a kids toy.
    Reply
  • tommo123 - Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - link

    well video playback laster 8 hours 19 mins with screen on max brightness, with wifi on and powering a usb OTG cable, a sd card/usb adapter and the SD card itself. now on 5%

    not too shabby.

    in airplane mode etc and an internal mSD card i think it could hit the 10 hours mark - especially with brightness lowered a tad
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - link

    Pretty much fits my experience! Fairly sure there are even gains to be had from rooting, tweaking etc. Reply
  • tommo123 - Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - link

    oh i rooted mine on the 2nd day and flashed a rom on the 3rd :) Reply
  • PeteH - Thursday, October 25, 2012 - link

    So maybe not the best example of a "typical" user's experience ;) Reply
  • tommo123 - Friday, October 26, 2012 - link

    nope :)

    i did my own test yest though

    i let 720p vids play non stop yest on this in airplane mode, max brightness (like i was on a plane) and was impressed! played for 11 hours 38 mins before it hit 5%. so say 12 hours video playback.

    nice.no need for a laptop to play vids on a flight anymore. just this and a spare battery for when i get off the plane :)

    plus 1 for removable batteries! :D
    Reply
  • Peanutsrevenge - Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - link

    No point in LTE?
    You may regret that soon, 4G's rolling out as we speak.
    Was in T-mo store the other day helping mate choose a phone (got S3 i9305, could convince him to get note II) and sales advisor reckons 6 months for Bournemouth.
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Thursday, October 25, 2012 - link

    This one does vary a lot by where you live. Their definition of "coverage" might be interesting too, given how their standard network holds up. Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now