While NVIDIA somewhat has ForceWare Multimedia out the door, it is only being shipped with one Personal Cinema, with which we take issue; that "one Personal Cinema" being eVGA's GeForce FX 5700 Personal Cinema. Granted, a public web-posting is scheduled for later in the summer, and most people still won't be able to get a hold of FWM unless they buy eVGA's newest Personal Cinema card.

We did a GeForce FX Personal Cinema Roundup a while back, which at that time included Asus, Chaintech, MSI, and eVGA. The latter of the four would probably be the only one who can be called a consistent Personal Cinema board partner of NVIDIA's, since they started out with the GeForce4 MX440 Personal Cinema. The first three mentioned (Asus, Chaintech, and MSI) have only joined the ranks of NVIDIA's Personal Cinema board partners for GeForce FX 5200 and 5600 (Chaintech and MSI only) versions.

While Asus and Chaintech look like they have kind of frozen their Personal Cinema projects, MSI is trying to fill the gap with a multimedia and graphics combo card of their own, bypassing their dependence on NVIDIA, which has its own downsides and benefits. And while we are on that note, the MSI has a GeForce FX 5600 Personal Cinema (with a product page somewhat hidden deep in their website), but we have yet to see it available for purchase. Though, we can speculate that it is highly likely to be available only for OEM solutions. MSI isn't the only one; it seems all across the board, NVIDIA's board partners (save eVGA) either have not done a GeForce FX 5600 Personal Cinema card or have made it a very small emphasis of their multimedia card portfolio.

This brings us to eVGA, which is the only one to produce a post-GeForce FX 5600 Personal Cinema card. Up until now, all Personal Cinema's have followed a general format, similar to what ATI has done with All-in-Wonders. With a few changes, let's see what was scrapped and what was added.

eVGA's GeForce FX 5700 Personal Cinema – The Card
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  • AndrewKu - Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - link

    #8 - That is very interesting... In theory, it shouldn't do anything; could be some fluke thing with the driver or possibly optical illusion. I will look into it later... Reply
  • glennpratt - Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - link

    Well I've used it on my HDTV to make the image smaller, which in effect gets rid of overscan. I'm using VGA to RGBHV adapter as opposed to YPrPb so it may be different for me. Reply
  • AndrewKu - Monday, August 16, 2004 - link

    #2- Are you sure you mean NVKeystone? That has no bearing on overscan. Anyways that is mainly for notebooks outputing a video source to something like a projector in native computer resolutions, not HDTV ones. Reply
  • glennpratt - Monday, August 16, 2004 - link

    No answer? Reply
  • nullpointerus - Monday, August 16, 2004 - link

    A 10 ft. UI means that the interface is clear enough to see and use on a TV screen that is approximately 10 ft. from the viewer. That's important if you are setting up a home theater PC (HTPC) with a remote, for example. Reply
  • AndrewKu - Monday, August 16, 2004 - link

    #3 - Yes that is what it means. My apologies for not clarifying. Reply
  • jediknight - Monday, August 16, 2004 - link

    >> 10 ft. UI <<

    This is mentioned several times in the article, and I have no clue what this means.

    Sounds to me like ten feet user interface??!
    Reply
  • glennpratt - Sunday, August 15, 2004 - link

    Did you try using NVKeystone to fix the overscan? Is that not available on HD out? Make sure you hit the lock Icon then just make it smaller. Reply
  • thatsright - Sunday, August 15, 2004 - link

    WOW! I'm really tired! Reply

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