Analyzing Creator Mode and Game Mode

Way back on page 3, this review explained that AMD was promoting two modes: Creator Mode with all cores enabled and a uniform memory access (UMA) architecture, and Game Mode that disabled one of the dies and adjusted to a non-uniform memory architecture (NUMA). The idea was that in Creator Mode you had all the threads and bandwidth, while Game Mode focused on compatibility with games that freaked out if you had too many cores, but also memory and core-to-core latency by pinning data as close to the core as possible, and keeping related threads all within the same Zeppelin die. Both methods have their positives and negatives, and although they can be enabled through a button press in Ryzen Master and a reboot, most users who care enough about these settings are likely to set it and forget it. (And then notice that if the BIOS resets, so does the settings…)

*This page has been edited on 8/17, due to a misinterpretation in the implementation of Game Mode. This original review has been updated to reflect this. We have written a secondary mini-article with fresh testing on the effects of Game Mode.

Power Consumption and Distribution 2017: The Core Wars (Conclusions)
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  • Zoeff - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    Yeeeees! Thanks for the review! I was hoping there'd be an embargo lift at this hour. :D Reply
  • EloiseSheppard - Saturday, August 12, 2017 - link

    I resigned my office-job and now I am getting paid 94 DOLLLAR hourly. How? I work over internet! My old work was making me miserable, so I was forced to try something different, two years after...I can say my life is changed-completely for the better!

    Check it out what i do... http://cutt.us/yeEfA
    Reply
  • Zingam - Sunday, August 13, 2017 - link

    The best CPUs for MineSweeper in 2017 in a single article!!!! Reply
  • NikosD - Monday, August 14, 2017 - link

    Anandtech is simply wrong regarding Game mode or "Legacy Compatibility Mode" as you prefer to call it and make jokes about it.

    It seems that you don't know what ALL other reviewers say that Game mode doesn't set SMT off, but it disables one die.

    So, Threadripper doesn't become a 16C/16T CPU after enabling Game mode as you say, but a 8C/16T CPU like ALL other reviewers say.

    Go read Tom's Hardware which says that Game mode executes "bcdedit /set numproc XX" in order to cut 8 cores and shrink the CPU to one die (8C/16T) but because that's a software restriction the memory and PCIe controller of the second die is still alive, giving Quad Channel memory support and full 60+4 PCIe lanes even in Game mode.

    And you thought you are smart and funny regarding your Game mode comments...
    Reply
  • Dr. Swag - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    In paragraph two you say Ryzen 3 has double the threads of i3, I think you mean to say double the cores :) Reply
  • IanHagen - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    Not trying to nitpick or imply anything but... There is a logical reason for Threadripper getting five pages of gaming performance review and Skylake-X not even appearing on the charts more than a month after it was reviewed? Reply
  • Ian Cutress - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    Bottom of page one. Reply
  • IanHagen - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    With all due respect Mr. Cutress, "circumstances beyond our control" and "odd BIOS/firmware gaming results" didn't prevent anyone from bashing Ryzen for its gaming performance on its debut. Reply
  • Ian Cutress - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    We didn't post gaming performance for Ryzen at launch either, for similar reasons. Reply
  • bongey - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    Stop lying , you commented on gaming performance in your conclusion, without even benchmarking it in gaming.
    That is much worse.
    Reply

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