SilverStone has introduced its new CPU cooler designed for ultra-thin PCs, such as thin mini-ITX as well as mini-STX systems. The cooling solution is as thin as an Intel coolers, but this one is rated to cool chips with up to 65 W TDP.

The SilverStone Nitrogon NT08-115XP CPU cooler has a core made of solid copper as a well as an aluminum radiator with bifurcated fins. The cooling system is equipped with a sleeve bearing fan with 1200 ~ 3400 RPM rotating speed that can create air flow of up to 16 CFM. The new Nitrogon NT08-115XP is 101 mm wide and 33 mm tall meaning that it is compatible with a variety of low-profile systems that do not have a lot of tall components around their CPU sockets. Despite its relatively small dimensions, the cooler is rated to a thermal conductivity for up to 65 W, a typical TDP of quad-core microprocessors with powerful integrated GPUs.

SilverStone positions its new Nitrogon-series cooler (SST-NT08-115XP) as a companion for its VT01 Mini-STX chassis, but the device can naturally be used for all the other ultra-thin PCs as well. In fact, the SST-NT08-115XP can be attached to any motherboard with Intel’s LGA1150/1151/1155/1156 socket, but in the vast majority of cases it will be used inside current-gen machines that are based on Intel’s Skylake or Kaby Lake processors in LGA1151 packaging.

SilverStone Nitrogon NT08 Specifications
  SST-NT08-115XP
CPU TDP 65 W
Material Copper center, extruded aluminum fins
Dimension with Fan 101 mm (W) × 33 mm (H) × 101 mm (D)
Air Pressure 0.3 ~ 2.43 mm H2O
Air Flow (CFM) 5.64 ~ 15.98CFM
Speed 1200 ~ 3400RPM
Noise 16.5 ~ 28.98 dBA
Type of Bearing Sleeve bearing
Life Expectancy 40,000 hours
Weight 292 grams

Intel itself bundles low-profile CPU coolers with its processors up to 65 W TDP. Such coolers lack a copper base and, as seen in our roundup of stock coolers, not the best solution available. Meanwhile, in previous years, the more power hungry parts have been shipped with larger cooling solutions that also lack copper for cost reasons and are generally noisy. By contrast, SilverStone’s Nitrogon coolers promise both 65 W thermal conductivity and relatively silent operation (at least, under light loads when the fans do not rotate at high speeds).

The SilverStone Nitrogon NT08-115XP CPU cooler is expected to hit the store shelves in the coming weeks. Exact pricing of the product is unknown, but its NT07-115X brother costs $33 in the U.S.

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Source: SilverStone

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  • nwarawa - Friday, December 09, 2016 - link

    "...Sleeve bearing...$33..." Nope. Try again, Silverstone. You don't get to expect $33 for something equal or inferior to free. Reply
  • nwarawa - Friday, December 09, 2016 - link

    Sleeve is especially bad these slim coolers, since the systems will normally be oriented horizontally. This leads to gravity pulling the lubricant down off the bearing of the fan. Reply
  • LordanSS - Friday, December 09, 2016 - link

    I think rifle bearing would have been better, but it'd cost a bit more.

    One of my machines, housed in an old CoolerMaster CM690 II Advanced, has a bunch of sleeve bearing fans. They're not bad, and after re-lubbing the fans recently things are just fine. Couple of those fans are 6+ years old, too.
    Reply
  • Samus - Friday, December 09, 2016 - link

    I just relubed an AVC fan in my NAS, again.

    Tried to upgrade it to a Delta but the PWM software rejected the Delta's sensor...it's a .45a fan replacing a .16a fan, so the cooling curve is probably different.
    Reply
  • Samus - Friday, December 09, 2016 - link

    I couldn't agree more. Sleeve bearing fans are OK for intake and perhaps exhaust fans, but heatsinks? It's going to dry the shaft out in a few years at best (assuming the most desirable sub 40c operating environment.)

    Maybe that is why it has a laughable life expectancy. 40,000 hours is FOUR YEARS.

    I expect much better from Silverstone. This is a downright embarrassing addition to their product portfolio.
    Reply
  • Morawka - Friday, December 09, 2016 - link

    gravity wont effect it when it's spinning.. Reply
  • flyingpants1 - Saturday, December 10, 2016 - link

    Umm, yes it will. Reply
  • lazarpandar - Saturday, December 10, 2016 - link

    This comment reveals one hell of a misunderstanding of basic physics. Reply
  • Anato - Saturday, December 10, 2016 - link

    You should try it too! Take office chair for spin. Then ask assisting friend to thrust you through space. :P Reply
  • Morawka - Saturday, December 10, 2016 - link

    you should work on your analogies. Reply

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