Final Thoughts

NVIDIA is primarily pitching the GeForce GTX 780 as the next step in their high-end x80 line of video cards, a role it fits into well. At the same time however I can’t help but to keep going back to GTX Titan comparisons due to the fact that the GTX 780 is by every metric a cut-down GTX Titan card. Whether this is a good thing or not is open to debate, but with NVIDIA’s emergence into the prosumer market with GTX Titan and the fact that there’s now a single-GPU video card above the traditionally top-tier x80 card, this complicates things as compared to past x80 card launches.

Anyhow, we’ll start with the obvious: the GeForce GTX 780 is a filler card whose most prominent role will be filling the game between sub-$500 cards and this odd prosumer/luxury/ultra-enthusiast market that has taken root above $500. If there’s to be a $1000 single-GPU card in NVIDIA’s product stack then it’s simply good business to have something between that and the sub-$500 market, and that something is the GTX 780.

For the small number of customers that can afford a card in this price segment, the GTX 780 is an extremely strong contender. In fact it’s really the only contender – at least as far as single-GPU cards go – as AMD won’t directly be competing with GK110. The end result is that with the GTX 780 delivering an average of 90% of Titan’s gaming performance for 65% of the price, this is by all rights the Titan Mini, the cheaper video card Titan customers have been asking for. From that perspective the GTX 780 is nothing short of an amazing deal for the level of performance offered, especially since it maintains the high build quality and impressive acoustics that helped to define Titan.

On the other hand, as an x80 card the GTX 780 is pretty much a tossup. The full generational performance improvement is absolutely there, as the GTX 780 beats the last-generation GTX 580 by an average of 80%. NVIDIA knows their market well, and for most buyers in a 2-3 year upgrade cycle this is the level of performance necessary to spur on an upgrade.

The catch comes down to pricing. $650 for the GTX 780 makes all the sense in the world from NVIDIA’s perspective – GTX Titan sales have exceeded NVIDIA’s expectations – so between that and Tesla K20 sales the GK110 GPU is in high demand right now. At the same time the performance of the GTX 780 is high enough that AMD can’t directly compete with the card, leaving NVIDIA without competition and free to set prices as they would like, and this is exactly what they have done.

This doesn’t make GTX 780 a bad card, and on the contrary it’s probably a better card than any x80 card before it, particularly when it comes to build quality. But it’s $650 for a product tier that for the last 5 years was a $500 product tier. To that end no one likes a price increase, ourselves included. Ultimately some fraction of the traditional x80 market will make the jump to $650, and for the rest there will be the remainder of the GeForce 700 family or holding out for the eventual GeForce 800 family.

Moving on, it’s interesting to note that with the launch of Titan and now the GTX 780, the high-end single-GPU market looks almost exactly like it did back in 2011. The prices have changed, but otherwise we’ve returned to unchallenged NVIDIA domination of the high end, with AMD fighting the good fight at lower price points. The 22% performance advantage that the GTX 780 enjoys over the Radeon HD 7970GHz Edition cements NVIDIA’s performance lead, while the price difference between the cards means that the 7970GE is still a very strong contender in its current $400 market and a clear budget-saving spoiler like the 6970 before it.

Finally, to bring things to a close we turn our gaze towards the future of the rest of the GeForce 700 family.  The GTX 780 is the first of the GeForce 700 family but it clearly won’t be the last. A cut-down GK110 card as GTX 780 was the logical progression for NVIDIA, but what to use to replace GTX 670 is a far murkier question as NVIDIA has a number of good choices at their disposal. Mull that over for a bit, and hopefully we’ll be picking up the subject soon.

Power, Temperature, & Noise
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  • varad - Thursday, May 23, 2013 - link

    You do realize that a GPU like Titan has almost 5 times the number of transistors compared to Intel's biggest Core i7 CPU, right? There are 7.1 billion transistors in Titan vs 1.4 billion in Core i7 3770k. So, it means they cannot match the price of "a good CPU" unless they decide to become a non-profit organization :) Reply
  • AssBall - Thursday, May 23, 2013 - link

    Well if all you needed was a single titan to run your is, computations, games, and nothing else, then no problem. Reply
  • krutou - Sunday, May 26, 2013 - link

    Two problems with your logic

    22 nm fabrication is more expensive (price per transistor)

    CPUs are more difficult to design
    Reply
  • An00bis - Friday, May 31, 2013 - link

    it's not like you can just shove your hand in a jar full of transistors and just slap it on a chip and consider it a cpu, a cpu is required to do a gpu's task (integrated gpu) AND be good at everything a gpu can't do, which is... well lots of things actually. A gpu is much simpler, hence why the manufacturing + designing cost is probably more expensive than a big ass card that has to include memory+a pcb+a gpu Reply
  • chizow - Thursday, May 23, 2013 - link

    Great card, but a year late. This is what GTX 600 series should've been but we all know how that went.

    I think Nvidia made some pretty big mistakes with how they handled the entire Kepler generation after Tahiti's launch price debacle. I know their financial statements and stockholders don't agree but they've managed to piss off their core consumers at every performance segment.

    Titan owners have to feel absolutely gutted at this point having paid $1000 for a part that is only ~10-15% faster than the GTX 780. End result of this generation is we are effectively paying 50-100% more for the same class of card than previous generations. While the 780 is a great card and a relatively good value compared to Titan, we're still paying $650 for what is effectively Kepler's version of the GTX 470.
    Reply
  • Crisium - Thursday, May 23, 2013 - link

    People who bought a Titan knew what they were getting into. If you have regrets, you were in no position to buy a $1000 GPU to begin with and made a grievous financial error.

    $650 isn't horrible for this price, but you are still paying the Nvidia Tax.
    Reply
  • chizow - Thursday, May 23, 2013 - link

    I don't think so, if you polled GTX Titan owners if they would've paid $1000 knowing 2-3 months later there would be a part that performed similarly at 35% less price, I think you would hear most of them would've waited to buy not 1, but 2 for just a bit more. Or instead of buying 2 Titans, buying 3x780s.

    Also, it really has nothing to do with being in a financial position or not, it's funny when Titan released I made the comment anyone interested in Titan would be better served by simply investing that money into Nvidia stock, letting that money grow on Titan's fat margins, and then buying 2x780s when they released. All according to plan, for my initial investment of 1 Titan I can buy 2x780s.

    But I won't. Nvidia blew it this generation, I'll wait for Maxwell.
    Reply
  • IanCutress - Thursday, May 23, 2013 - link

    Titan was a compute card with optional gaming, rather than a gaming card with optional FP64 compute. That's why the price difference exists. If you bought a Titan card for Gaming, then you would/should have been smart enough to know that a similar card without compute was around the corner. Reply
  • chizow - Thursday, May 23, 2013 - link

    Unfortunately, that was never how *GTX* Titan was marketed, straight from the horses mouth:
    "With the DNA of the world’s fastest supercomputer and the soul of NVIDIA® Kepler™ architecture, GeForce® GTX TITAN GPU is a revolution in PC gaming performance."

    Not to mention the fact Titan is a horrible compute card and value outside of CUDA workloads, and even there it suffers as a serious compute card due to the lack of ECC. It's an overpriced gaming card, plain and simple.

    At the time, it was still uncertain whether or not Nvidia would launch more SKUs based on GK110 ASIC, but informed consumers knew Nvidia had to do something with all the chips that didn't make the TDP cut as Tesla parts.
    Reply
  • mayankleoboy1 - Thursday, May 23, 2013 - link

    Really ? Apart from a few apps, Titan is poor compared to a 7970. It has bad OpenGL performance, which 90% of industry renderfarms use.
    Titan is really an overpriced gaming card.
    Reply

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