Power Consumption

Intel isn't really exploiting 22nm for significantly higher default or max turbo frequencies. While it does seem like you'll hit turbo frequencies more often with Ivy, most of what 22nm offers will be realized as power savings.

The data in the charts below is from our original 3770K preview, however I've also provided a table comparing the 3770K to the 2700K using Intel's own Z77 motherboard which is a bit more power hungry than our typical testbed:

Power Consumption Comparison
Intel DZ77GA-70K Idle Load (x264 2nd pass)
Intel Core i7 3770K 80.1W 146.4W
Intel Core i7 2700K 79.4W 177.6W

As you can see, there are no savings at idle and a reasonably significant improvement under load.

The same is echoed on our earlier chip in a more power efficient platform:

Power Consumption—Idle

Power Consumption—Load (x264 HD 3.03 2nd Pass)

I was also curious to see what power consumption would look like compared to other low-end GPUs. For these next results I used the 3770K alone, without a discrete card and measured power consumption. I then added in discrete GPUs from our HD 4000 comparisons and looked at both idle and load power while playing Metro 2033:

GPU Power Consumption—Idle

Obviously at idle it's impossible to beat the HD 4000, the GPU is largely stopped/gated when idle keeping power consumption to a minimum. Under load is where things get interesting:

GPU Power Consumption—Load (Metro 2033)

Ivy's GPU is much more power efficient than SNB's, however Intel still has a way to go before it starts to equal the power efficiency of modern discrete GPU architectures. Remember the HD 4000 is on Intel's 22nm process here while the GT 440 is built on TSMC's 40nm process.

Intel HD 4000 Performance: Compute & Synthetics Quick Sync Image Quality & Performance
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  • sld - Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - link

    .... and in this multivariate comparison you choose to ignore the superior battery life which makes Llano a serious competitor in the mobile space. Reply
  • midn8t - Thursday, June 28, 2012 - link

    this the frames pre secound for CPU, you cant really figure out well when gamming its all mostly based around what ever video card they used, in this artical so I would have to guess that they might have used diffrent GPU video card in each system.

    obivuously they cant use same motherboard for amd vs intel

    Also I find it wired that other reciews have Rated the phenom II x6 lower in preformance then the FX chip makes it wired how these review claims that the phenom II which is lower grade CPU is more powerfull then the top of the line AMD product out.
    Reply
  • zeagus - Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - link

    A huge chunk of text is spent explaining how while its a step in the right direction, they need to do more on the GPU side of the equation. Take off your strangely coloured glasses. Reply
  • wingless - Monday, April 23, 2012 - link

    EDIT: I'M NOT KIDDING. I bought my 2600K the Friday before last for $199 and paired it with an ASUS P8Z77-V PRO. Ivy Bridge is simply too hot and lacks OC performance.

    I overclock so I WILL be keeping my 2600K for the foreseeable future!
    Reply
  • fredisdead - Sunday, April 29, 2012 - link

    So HD4000 igp is weaker than last gen Brazos ?? Based on the leaked Trinity benchmarks, Trinity blows any Intel igp into the weeds, never mind the ( already 1.5 yr old ) Brazos, which is 'only' 5% faster. Reply
  • fredisdead - Sunday, April 29, 2012 - link

    So HD4000 igp is weaker than last gen Brazos ?? Based on the leaked Trinity benchmarks, Trinity blows any Intel igp into the weeds, never mind the ( already 1.5 yr old ) Brazos, which is 'only' 5% faster. Reply
  • 1ceTr0n - Monday, April 23, 2012 - link

    I'll keep my 2500k @ 4.6ghz

    Not kidding
    Reply
  • smookyolo - Monday, April 23, 2012 - link

    And I'll keep mine at 4.9GHz.

    But that's just because I'll be waiting for the tock, not the tick.

    I will however be getting a Ivy Bridge Laptop soon.
    Reply
  • Flunk - Monday, April 23, 2012 - link

    Me too, the 2500K is a great chip. Especially with watercooling. Reply
  • Ratman6161 - Monday, April 23, 2012 - link

    For anyone like me who already has a Sandy Bridge quad core (mine's a 2600K) it wouldn't make a lot of sense to "upgrade" to an Ivy bridge. But for those with older systems looking to upgrade, these actually seem like pretty good deals. @ $313 the 3770K is cheaper than the 2700K and cheaper than the typical price on a 2600K (unless like me you are lucky enough to live near a Micro Center).

    As to those complaining about graphics, come on. Will anyone who really cares a lot about graphics, particularly gaming, be using the on board graphics anyway?
    Reply

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